College student invents gel that halts bleeding

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posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 03:31 PM
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It's an insta clot. Probably turns the bloodstream into gelatin. Comes in a box and can be red-gel, yellow-gel, or my favorite, lime-gel. My sarcastic button is stuck; just wondering about the future for feminine hygiene.

It reminds me of the stuff the body produces naturally after a break in a bone. All this plasma-yellow stuff comes around and glues together the broken part, like gelatin...because it is in a way. The demonstration is awesome, but after the plug-up, then there is that problem of backwash into body tissues, resulting in one massive blood blister at the wound site.




posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by Clairaudience

Originally posted by Philippines

Originally posted by Clairaudience

Plants naturally produce a material similar to the human extracellular matrix, but Landolina improves the process by using genetically modified plants to create Veti-Gel.



This sounded AMAZING until I got to the genetically modified plant part. I would wait to see several generations of rats use this stuff and see what happens first. Even then I would like to see the papers to see what trans-gmo plants were used, which reads like that is what was used and long term effect studies. (Just like companies like Monsatan (Monsanto) offer readily...
)


One must admit that genetically modified - anything has a bad reputation, especially due to corporations like Monsanto which have a highly questionable agenda. In theory, there is nothing wrong about genetically modified food or medication, in fact its quite safe and a necessity in these times. In Monsanto's case though, I absolutely agree with you, they aren't the most trustworthy and one should always question their motives.


Hmm.. So you think it's safe? Let's use the term trans-GMO (trans species genetically modified organism.)

In theory you think there is nothing wrong with trans-gmo food or medication, that's fine. The thing is, it is still a theory. There are no released long term studies from Monsatan that I have found. Maybe you know of some public studies released on their trans-GMO Maize, soya, or other products? Studies that are long term and multi-generational are what I am looking for in particular.

Again if it's a theory, why should this stuff be even considered for use without proper long term scientific studies?

Do you know of any other FDA approved medicine that uses trans-gmo plants as part of its composition? There probably are, I don't know =b



posted on Apr, 9 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by Clairaudience
 


i know lol silly ^^, it was more of a joke than anything, even the army abandoned it because it didnt work properly or keep wounds closed very long, i just always find it funny thats what it was originally invented for heh.



posted on Jul, 25 2014 @ 09:59 AM
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I WONDER if Bioware can sue him for this

Medi-gel (medical gel) is an all-purpose medicinal salve combining an anaesthetic and clotting agent used by paramedics, EMTs, and military personnel, produced by the Sirta Foundation. It heals various wounds and ailments, instantly sealing injuries against infection and allowing for rapid healing by having the gel grip tight to flesh until subjected to a frequency of ultrasound. It is sealable against liquids - most notably blood - as well as contaminants and gases. While technically its properties make it illegal under genetic modification laws, in this case the restriction is ignored because of the product's beneficial properties.

Mass Effect - Medi-Gel



posted on Jul, 27 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: pimptriggs

I seriously doubt Bioware has made a patent for an in game virtual item



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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so your saying that a video game that is copy written, the items, characters and all aspects of the video game are not?
Like if I were to write a book, and i the book i come up with a great idea to cure Melanoma, turns out the cure really works and someone else is profiting, you don't think some entitle ship is due?
just curious



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: pimptriggs

Total, and utter twaddle.

For a start, the video game does not describe the product in nearly enough detail to put a patent upon. In the game in question, it is a loosely described item, having a name, a purpose and a pseudoscientific description. However, there is not a full ingredients list, there is no method suggested as to how to combine those ingredients into a functional substance which achieves the goal intended for the product. Essentially, in order to create a product which achieves that aim, in the real world, it is still necessary to do all the research and development, all the lab work, experimentation, to establish the optimum quantities of each component in the finished product, in order to best achieve the aim of the product at hand.

Do you think that Gene Roddenberry's estate deserves to be inflated with the proceeds of cell phone sales? Do you think that Arthur C Clarke's estate ought to be credited with funds, purely because his works (many and various) were intrinsic to the space industry, and still have things to teach us about travel among the stars?

When the military build an armour suit with electronic components and augmented capabilities, will they owe Stan Lee money? No. They will not.

If I design a car, from the bottom up, and draw up plans for every component part, diagrams showing the way they go together, detailed measurements of each intended component, as well as charts showing the potential power and handling advantages of the design, and then someone sees those plans, and builds my car from those designs, THAT is an issue.

But if all I do, is draw a pretty looking body shell, and draw up a list of performance statistics that I would like the item to have, and then someone goes ahead and applies themselves to that challenge, that is an entirely different situation. In this scenario, I have not done any actual work on the project, I have not described and detailed the parts to be used, the methodology applied to achieve those performance statistics, I have merely imagined something in a fairly shallow manner, and put it out there as a loose idea.



posted on Jul, 28 2014 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

consumerist.com...

come on bro, America is filled with far more ludicrous lawsuits that i cant see this as something they would try.



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 12:28 AM
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originally posted by: pimptriggs
so your saying that a video game that is copy written, the items, characters and all aspects of the video game are not?
Like if I were to write a book, and i the book i come up with a great idea to cure Melanoma, turns out the cure really works and someone else is profiting, you don't think some entitle ship is due?
just curious


In this case the best shot Bioware would have is if they filed a trademark (also through the US patent and trade office) on the Medi-gel term. Then the inventor of physical medi-gel would have to change the name or face a potential lawsuit.

Again, I doubt Bioware is patenting/trademarking virtual items for video games. It's too much time and money



posted on Jul, 29 2014 @ 02:47 AM
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a reply to: pimptriggs

Just because there have been dumber rulings in the past, does not make the idiotic nature of litigation against this product, this college kid, any more acceptable to a rational mind!



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit
WELL THATS THAT, Im making my own space ship and calling it the Normandy SR3



posted on Jul, 31 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: pimptriggs

Go right ahead. At the current speed of movement with regard to FTL systems, the patents and copyrights involved will be invalid by the time it has its first shake down cruise around the solar system!





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