Boeing close to authority to offer 777X

page: 1
1

log in

join

posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:11 AM
link   
Boeing is expected to decide at their next board meeting whether or not to allow their Commercial division the authority to put the 777X on the table to the airlines. That would lead to a 6 year development plan, with the first of the new aircraft being ready in 2019. The 777-8X would be sized to succeed the 777-300LR, while the -9X would enter the 400+ seat market for the first time.

The big question that comes now is the engine. Boeing signed a sole source supplier contract with GE in 1999 to supply engines for the 777 family. GE has gone ahead with development of their new GE9X engine, designed for the 777X program, despite Boeing not having made a decision on whether or not to offer the aircraft. This would put the engine in line for being ready in 2018, ahead of the new airframe.

Boeing had considered allowing airlines the choice of the GE9X, or the Rolls Royce RB3025 that is being developed (a 100,000lb class engine), but it's thought that they don't want to assist in the development of an engine that might later be used for the A350 program, if Airbus goes ahead with the A350-1200.


Boeing’s board of directors is expected to decide as early as its next meeting in April whether to give the Commercial Airplanes division authority to offer the proposed 777X derivative to airlines.

The milestone move, if confirmed, puts Boeing at the start of a six-year development track culminating with the entry into service of the first of two new 777 family members in 2019. The extended twinjet series will include a 777-8X, sized to succeed today’s 777-300ER, and a larger 777-9X which opens up new territory in the 400-plus seat, long range market.

Before the 777X proposal goes before the board, however, Boeing needs to finalize one of the most crucial decisions it has faced over the new development: whether to offer the larger twin with a choice of engines. The longer range 777-200LR/300ER versions, which now account for all but a handful of 777 orders, are powered by General Electric

Source




posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:33 AM
link   
I mean my reply as a legitimate question because I read your OP as a confused bunny. Perhaps you can help un-confuse me.


isn't Boeing suffering left, right and all around on humiliation and defeat for their 787 Dreamliner? I just pulled it up again for general reference and most hits are headlines about groundings, delays and mishaps with that plane. Given that, wouldn't Boeing be better served in making what they have work properly before coming out with yet another product to say THAT one will work when their flagship doesn't? It's kinda hard to say with a straight face isn't it? Or...are they just writing off the whole 787 experience as a bad nightmare and moving on like it never happened? (that seems unlikely)?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


The 777X has two huge advantages over the failure of the Dreamliner program. Advantage one is that it's based on the currently flying 777, that has been in service since the 1990s, and is one of their more popular aircraft.

The second advantage is that unlike the Dreamliner, which they wanted to go from locking the design, to first flight in like 2 years, this one is under a 6 year development plan, which gives them time to work out any bugs from the design change.

They're still working on the Dreamliner problems (almost all of which are battery related), but other than static tests, there's not a lot they can do until they get permission to do test flights, which probably won't happen until after the NTSB hearings next month. Once they can start flying again, then they can concentrate on the Dreamliner battery issues.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:48 AM
link   
the dreamliner has no real problem....and that 777 is the bomb, too....so really they rule the air with 4 great jetliners.....did you know the airbus is too awkward to be safe on the all-important return to earth bit.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:51 AM
link   
Okay, well that's helpful to know for context then. In your opinion and exposure to aviation topics, you figure the 777 has a good shot at succeeding and becoming a viable aircraft without the endless drama of the 787?

It's been an ongoing saga I've loosely followed between Boeing's headaches and Airbus with their little issues. None of them can seem to get things right these days? Perhaps the designs are just becoming too complex for their own good?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:09 AM
link   
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


The only real issue I see with the 7X is the folding wingtip bit. I really don't see it as a safety of flight issue, I just see it as added complexity, and something new the airlines are going to have to learn to deal with. The overall design should be a fairly easy one for them.

The numbers they're tossing out there are very impressive as well. The 777-9X would stretch the 300ER by adding four frames, but would have a 21% improvement in per seat fuel burn, and a 16% in cost per seat over the 300ER. The 8X would be a 10 frame stretch of the 200ER, but would have a derated engine at 88,000 lbs of thrust, as opposed to the 99,500 lb engines of the 9X. The third possible variant is the 8LX, which is a shrink of the 9X, with a similar take off weight (795,000 lbs), but would have a range that is 85 nm longer than the 200LR

It's probably going to have an alloy frame under the skin, with a redesigned fairing where the wing joins the fuselage, as well as an extended horizontal stabilizer. They are looking at carving the sidewall, to add 4 inches to the cabin width to keep the current 10 abreast seating in coach, and 9 in premium, but to give a little more room.

The cockpit would have a 60% commonality with current 777/787 aircraft, which would cut transition time down from 5 days, to 2.5 days.

So it's basically a very similar aircraft to the 777 you see out there, as far as looks go, with newer materials under the skin.

See if this link works. It goes into detail about the changes.
www.flightglobal.com...
edit on 3/11/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:26 AM
link   
I have worked in close proximity to commercial aircraft.
have also had the privileged of flying on them.

I will take a Boeing over airbus any day.

Its funny that they are going back to the 777

the 787 is to replace the aging 767
and is also supposed to adjust to the market of less people flying...
while having a more fuel efficient aircraft that could
still make the long hauls.

I think this is a mistake
they are starting to operate in a way
that ignores the economic climate...

I don't think your gonna have
as many people flying as often in the future.
cost of fuel is going up with the price of living
can't say so much for my wages



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:33 AM
link   
reply to post by spoonbender
 


The new Triple will come close to the Dreamliner in terms of cost per mile, as well has having a fairly well developed aircraft already. You might not have as many people flying in the future, but both the airlines, and the manufacturers see bigger planes as the way to go. Which in a way makes sense, as we can go to a point to point instead of hub and spoke system of air travel.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 04:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by spoonbender
 


The new Triple will come close to the Dreamliner in terms of cost per mile, as well has having a fairly well developed aircraft already. You might not have as many people flying in the future, but both the airlines, and the manufacturers see bigger planes as the way to go. Which in a way makes sense, as we can go to a point to point instead of hub and spoke system of air travel.


The wealth will be more distributed around the planet, and the global elite will take long international trips, whether from Moscow, Mumbai, Miami, or Myanmar.

The rest of us will be packed in slow buses.



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 05:49 AM
link   
Boeing's board of directors approved the 777X for sale to customers at their meeting at the end of April. After Jim Albaugh left last year Boeing slowed design of the aircraft. Albaugh wanted to introduce it by the end of 2012, but the new in service date is the end of the decade.

This is not a guarantee the program will be launched, but is the last step before a formal launch event.


Boeing has started offering the 777X to airlines and leasing companies, the last step before a formal launch event.

The new talks with customers cover "additional technical, pricing and schedule details" about the possibly stretched, re-engined and rewinged update of the 777 series, Boeing says.

"We are aggressively moving forward per our plan and customers are happy with our progress," Boeing says.

The company's board of directors met to consider the "authority to offer" milestone on the 777X programme on 28 April, a day before an annual meeting of shareholders.

www.flightglobal.com...



posted on May, 2 2013 @ 04:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
I mean my reply as a legitimate question because I read your OP as a confused bunny. Perhaps you can help un-confuse me.


isn't Boeing suffering left, right and all around on humiliation and defeat for their 787 Dreamliner? I just pulled it up again for general reference and most hits are headlines about groundings, delays and mishaps with that plane. Given that, wouldn't Boeing be better served in making what they have work properly before coming out with yet another product to say THAT one will work when their flagship doesn't? It's kinda hard to say with a straight face isn't it? Or...are they just writing off the whole 787 experience as a bad nightmare and moving on like it never happened? (that seems unlikely)?


How about

a) There is a six year period between starting and completing design of a new model
b) the 787 will be fixed in 6 years, more like 1 year.
c) Boeing has to be able to do more than one thing at a time.
d) the 777 is Boeing's most profitable model. It's very important to give customers what they want, and it looks like they want a 777x. It's almost as big as the 747's and appears to have better fuel economy.
edit on 2-5-2013 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)





 
1

log in

join