Grocery stores should have either a manual cash registor or auxiliary power in event of a disaster.

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posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 



1) The majority of customers do NOT use cash.
2) There would be no way of reconciling the inventory of what was sold (the system tracks this when checking it out).
3) Most of the time, power is restored very quickly
4) Security is the primary concern, not sales.
5) Most stores don't even have enough light (without power) to do it anyhow.


All of these things can be done manually with the exception of electronic surveillance, which certainly isn’t necessary to make a sale. If people need items and businesses have those items, I think we can figure out a way to make it happen.

Based on some posts in this thread, I’m beginning to wonder how we ever survived (especially in business) before electricity and fancy electronic POS systems?




posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit

Originally posted by superman2012
reply to post by rickymouse
 

Paper and pen go a long way too.



I've seen that done at a couple of the smaller Saskatchewan communities.
Cheques also come out, and the old manual credit card machines.
If all you have is a debit card though, the store really has to know you, and will do an IOU

I've never seen it anywhere else though.


You just perfectly described my town. Yet another tick in the "pro" column for the survival minded. If it were a long term power outage though, better to have your own stores...but that is for another thread.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Having ran a small shop it can be hard to prepare for problems such as power outages as suddenly people will use that 20 in their wallet that they normally keep in reserve so you need to be able to get a load of change from somewhere and if you're not a place thats uses much cash you probably won't be keeping large quantities of coin bags around just for the fun of it, luckily for us when the power went out it took about 2 mins to light some candles and pop the "secret" switch on the till to open the cash draw and we just carried on recording stuff on a piece of paper but being a local corner shop we never had too much reliance on card based systems and it wasn't worth spending loads to keep the lights on so if it took too long it was just shut up shop and head off to the nearest pub with power



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 03:08 PM
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One summer many years Ago I used to work at a Grocery store. We had a power failure that kept the entire city without power for 3 days.

The 1st day all shelves of water/canned goods etc were stripped from the shelves. By day 3 the generators stopped and spoilage was making the entire store almost unbearable. People who would come in when we had manual registers we angry rude and borderline violent because we had so little left or stocked.


I made a vow to myself to be no where near a store when the lights go out...
edit on 11-3-2013 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 04:22 PM
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most newer one's do have backup power, minimal lights, freezers, and registers. a small natural gas backup generator can make you a lot of money after a big storm, corporate knows this.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by superman2012
reply to post by rickymouse
 

Paper and pen go a long way too.



Unfortunately, few people today would be able to count the amount due and to make change.

I once ran a building supply store and when power was out we kept running using paper and pen for registers, with generators and flood lights on stands.

When power came back, we ran paper through registers (including any credit cards).



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


Most people enjoy my antics, I keep things fresh and amusing. They should make a scooby doo episode about a ghost cashier.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 05:07 PM
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A little store or market can deal with a credit card machine and paper and pencils. Look at the shopping carts full of items in a grocery store. Most of these items have no price tags either. The only way a big supermarket could remain open is if they had back up power. Supermarkets could benefit by having back up generators, the loyalty of customers is a good thing if you have provided for them through rough times. I read that Lloyd of London sent their clients memos saying they are required to have back up power or their insurance claims for spoiled food will be denied. If the backup doesn't work because it is damaged or broke down they will honor claims.

Maybe our local Super One will put in a backup power unit during their expansion of the store that is presently going on.

This new electronic age makes us too vulnerable to problems.

edit on 11-3-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by zonetripper2065
 


No need for a cashier then as Scooby doobie doo would most assuredly have eaten all the goodies long before the power went out!



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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But in a disaster I would think there wont even be any employees to make any sales cause they would be with their families instead of going to work. Depends on the disaster of course also.


Gs



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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I ran a store that was converted from a grocery store. I found out from the HVAC guys working on our AC that we had an old natural gas backup generator, for the grocery store that was there before. I had them fix it up, and voila! backup power.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


dang old dog



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 11:06 PM
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Originally posted by Druscilla

Who uses real money anyway?

manual $ register won't do a thing for credit card.

Besides that, we all already know what happens in a disaster/survival scenario.
Once one person walks out with a cart of goods ignoring the register, it breaks the dam to bursting and all the mindless panicked fishies follow.





As a matter of fact, I do ALL my transactions using cash. No more credit cards or debit cards for. Unless the rare instance I need to buy an item online. Nowadays, that is rare.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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That scenario would never work for one reason....as would not calculators or pen & paper.

95%+ of people working in stores can't figure out change and count it back. If the machine doesn't tell them the amount to give back they are lost. Blame it on the public education system I guess?



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:02 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


thats what guns are for. Hand them the money and say thank you, lol



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


also most big grocery chains have bu generators.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:09 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


My dad always did.

We had a little Meat /mini market. The manual cash register came out plenty of times. He still keeps one around. Lessons learned.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:56 AM
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reply to post by seabag
 



All of these things can be done manually with the exception of electronic surveillance, which certainly isn’t necessary to make a sale. If people need items and businesses have those items, I think we can figure out a way to make it happen.

Based on some posts in this thread, I’m beginning to wonder how we ever survived (especially in business) before electricity and fancy electronic POS systems?


Simple, we had only small mom and pop stores then.

You can't do the volume of a modern grocery store without power, computerized inventory and pos systems, etc. Do you have ANY idea how long it would take to ring up $200 of groceries by hand, recording the inventory gone, etc.?

When you had 2000 people in a town, sure, a small mom and pop grocer could work without electricity...but a modern supermarket?

I don't know about most places, but here in FL, every grocery store I'm aware of has backup generators. It sometimes takes a few minutes to switch over, but the power isn't the issue, it's restarting the POS computer system that takes so long...


95%+ of people working in stores can't figure out change and count it back


There is that too. Our horse boarders are often amazed by just the simple calculations I do in my head...I'm more amazed they can't...nothing difficult mind you....
edit on 12-3-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


In Miami Florida most grocery stores have a small bus sized generator.

And it's a state law as well for gas stations.

www.wjhg.com...


State officials are trying to have a backup plan for when that electricity does go off.

Thursday, Gov. Jeb Bush signed a new law requiring certain gas stations to have emergency backup generators, but other businesses are also taking extra steps to be ready.

The new law requires any company with more than 10 gas stations in a county to have generators at those stations. The hope is if a hurricane knocks out power, you won't be left in the dark.

But if power is out longer than a few days, those generators will run out of gas, so the new Florida law is aimed at keeping the tanks full by requiring some gas stations to have their own generators.

Legislators want stations to be up and running immediately after a hurricane hits.

Florida's largest supermarket chain has created its own initiative to make sure its stores can open after a hurricane. Publix is spending $100 million to install 500 kilowatt generators at every store in hurricane prone areas.

In 2004 alone, Publix lost $60 million from groceries that went bad after hurricanes knocked out power to its stores.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by grey580
reply to post by rickymouse
 


In Miami Florida most grocery stores have a small bus sized generator.

And it's a state law as well for gas stations.

www.wjhg.com...


State officials are trying to have a backup plan for when that electricity does go off.

Thursday, Gov. Jeb Bush signed a new law requiring certain gas stations to have emergency backup generators, but other businesses are also taking extra steps to be ready.

The new law requires any company with more than 10 gas stations in a county to have generators at those stations. The hope is if a hurricane knocks out power, you won't be left in the dark.

But if power is out longer than a few days, those generators will run out of gas, so the new Florida law is aimed at keeping the tanks full by requiring some gas stations to have their own generators.

Legislators want stations to be up and running immediately after a hurricane hits.

Florida's largest supermarket chain has created its own initiative to make sure its stores can open after a hurricane. Publix is spending $100 million to install 500 kilowatt generators at every store in hurricane prone areas.

In 2004 alone, Publix lost $60 million from groceries that went bad after hurricanes knocked out power to its stores.


Wow, I wish they would make it a state law here in Michigan, At least for big chain grocery stores. If I had a little grocery store, I would have a backup generator to make sure I didn't have spoilage. I should turn my commercial building into a store. Maybe I can get my daughter to run it if I started it. I'd have to spend some time with her teaching her how to run a business. That might not be a bad idea, it will give me something to do.





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