What would happen if the earth were hollow?

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posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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I see a few articles around saying the earth is hollow. Maybe even some people on ATS believe the earth is hollow. But, that is impossible. Why do I say that? Good question. One, our magnetic field comes from the molten core inside. If the earth were hollow, the molten core would be gone, which means no magnetic field. Why is that a problem? Well our magnetic field protects us from solar radiation and solar wind. Those two things would kill us. Okay...so let's suppose you went inside the earth to protect yourself from those things....you'd still die, because of the little amount of oxygen that would be inside the earth.

Here's a video talking about what would happen if the earth were hollow.


edit on 9-3-2013 by blahxd67 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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It's a nice fantasy, the Hollow Earth bit. But scientists can and have used the Earth's quakes to see deep into the planet.
Here is one of the more interesting bits for your perusal.


www.psc.edu...

A Seismic Adventure There's a giant crystal buried deep within the Earth, at the very center, more than 3,000 miles down. It may sound like the latest fantasy adventure game or a new Indiana Jones movie, but it happens to be what scientists discovered in 1995 with a sophisticated computer model of Earth's inner core. This remarkable finding, which offers plausible solutions to some perplexing geophysical puzzles, is transforming what Earth scientists think about the most remote part of our planet. "To understand what's deep in the Earth is a great challenge," says geophysicist Lars Stixrude. "Drill holes go down only 12 kilometers, about 0.2 percent of the Earth's radius. Most of the planet is totally inaccessible to direct observation." What scientists have pieced together comes primarily from seismic data. When shock waves from earthquakes ripple through the planet, they are detected by sensitive instruments at many locations on the surface. The record of these vibrations reveals variations in their path and speed to scientists who can then draw inferences about the planet's inner structure. This work has added much knowledge over the last ten years, including a puzzling observation: Seismic waves travel faster north-south than east-west, about four seconds faster pole-to-pole than through the equator. This finding, confirmed only within the past two years, quickly led to the conclusion that Earth's solid-iron inner core is "anisotropic" -- it has a directional quality, a texture similar to the grain in wood, that allows sound waves to go faster when they travel in a certain direction. What, exactly, is the nature of this inner-core texture?



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by Moshpet
 


I find it hilarious when people say the earth is hollow, because we can't dig. I mean we can, but it can only go so far because the earth gets so stinkin hot. I mean, if the earth were hollow, why does lava exist? or magma?(which are technically the same thing)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:44 PM
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I imagine that eventually, someone will be stupid enough to finally dig down to the first layer beneath the crust and create Earth's very own man-made Mt. Olympus. Then we'll know for sure. Until then, I think this is one I'll take on faith for what science tells us they figure it all is.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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What if my aunt was my uncle?
On topic, the earth would collapse upon itself like a deflated balloon if it were hollow. And the depths of the ocean like the mariana trench, with a depth of about 7 miles, shows just how deep you can go with out falling into a big hole. There has to be something to support the weight of all that water.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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we pump 750.000.000 barrels of oil per week out of the earth that leaves a big hole



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by billdadobbie
we pump 750.000.000 barrels of oil per week out of the earth that leaves a big hole


I think this article should prove to be helpful.
How Oil Drilling Works



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by billdadobbie
we pump 750.000.000 barrels of oil per week out of the earth that leaves a big hole


Yup, in my wallet.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by thesmokingman
 







posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


I imagine that eventually, someone will be stupid enough to finally dig down to the first layer beneath the crust and create Earth's very own man-made Mt. Olympus.
Nah. Geothermal drills have hit magma a few times. Nothing much happened.

But there is a project to go further.
www.iodp.org...
edit on 3/9/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:32 PM
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I wondered how the Earth could function if it was truly hollow and not just giant caverns so I set out to understand a few key elements and came up with a theory. I'm sure there are errors but here goes.

What if the center of the Earth was a ball of Hydrogen? A mini-Sun.

The Earth rotates at roughly 1000 miles an hour. Anything spinning causes centrifugal force which draws everything away from the center of the spinning mass. Think of a potters wheel while making a clay bowl.

The Earth has a good amount of water on her surface and no telling how much is under it. Water is made up of Hydrogen and Oxygen gases, both highly flammable in their purest forms.

Hydrogen has been proven to transmit magnetism. link

Hydrogen is one of the lightest gases. In a gas centrifuge, a device used to separate gas ions, lighter gases gravitate to the center as the device spins. Showing Hydrogen could be slowly collecting at the center of the Earth.

Okay, now you have spinning Earth acting as a gas centrifuge extracting Hydrogen gas from water which then gravitates to the center of the Earth. As the Earth continues to spin the Hydrogen is continuously gathering, feeding powering this mini-Sun.

The end result? A hollow Earth with it's own gravitational pull and Sun.

Again it's just a theory and probably full of holes.

edit on 9-3-2013 by TheLieWeLive because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 


How hot is this "mini-sun"? According to your theory.
edit on 9-3-2013 by blahxd67 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:35 PM
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All materials lose most of their magnetic properties when raised past a certain temperature called the curie point. The Curie temperature of iron is about 1043 K. This means that the inner and outer core of the planet is too hot to produce and maintain a magnetic field. It’s simply too hot for a magnetic field to be produced and maintained there.

how would spinning molten iron produce a magnetic field anyway?



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by tinhattribunal

All materials lose most of their magnetic properties when raised past a certain temperature called the curie point. The Curie temperature of iron is about 1043 K. This means that the inner and outer core of the planet is too hot to produce and maintain a magnetic field. It’s simply too hot for a magnetic field to be produced and maintained there.

how would spinning molten iron produce a magnetic field anyway?


Magnetic field of Earth



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by blahxd67
 


I think Hydrogen burns at around 4000F.

Pretty hot.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
reply to post by blahxd67
 


I think Hydrogen burns at around 4000F.

Pretty hot.


Wouldn't that kill us?



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:50 PM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 

With a perfect stoichiometric mixture hydrogen burns at 2800ºC (5072ºF). That mixture is 29% hydrogen in air.

If the hydrogen moves to the center because it's lightest, where does the air (oxygen) come from? Wouldn't the centrifuge action keep the two separated?



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:54 PM
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How would it kill us? I can only speculating on the size of this theorized hydrogen ball but what if it wasn't that big? What if it was only 500 feet across. That's nothing in comparison to the Earth itself. 4000 degrees would seem like nothing to us on the surface way up here.

Iron melts at 2800 °F according to my info so if the Earth had an Iron core then that's pretty hot itself.



posted on Mar, 10 2013 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Now come on Phage, I said it was a theory with possible holes.


Oxygen on the surface doesn't seem to be affected by the spin. Maybe the pressures can have a different effect on Oxygen at deeper depths?



posted on Mar, 10 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 

Maybe.
Or maybe the Earth isn't hollow.





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