Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

I got a pic from 2008 of something near the sun?

page: 2
6
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 07:51 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 07:57 PM
link   
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


If you notice that is between two “lines” on the picture. If you look closely the entire image has subtle lines breaking it up. I would have to make a guess that the image data is transferred or collected so many bits of data at a time, then split, put side by side, and the end image is produced. Since that black area seems to take up an entire are between lines, I would guess that is a little section of data loss during the transmission or collection of the data.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:04 PM
link   
Here are a couple of the lines that I can make out:

See them on the original? (they're subtle, so you have to look close)

Notice how similar in distance that both set are apart? To me, that speaks of data that’s been broken up in swaths, and you've lost a bit in the “blacked out” area.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:17 PM
link   
reply to post by defcon5
 


That's been my thought on it for some time, it is some type of pixelation. But the color differences within the pic keep's me from being sure. The times I have seen Pixelation in other photos they have been, all white, or all black from Lasco 3.

I am seriously thinking of deleting it to get it out of my head. Cause I guess I will never know.

To sum up this thread so far it is either lens flare, a planet, radiation/ gamma burst, a scratch on a record ( that was helpful), or last but not least a......................




I would say it's a huge interstellar mothership, caught in the moment of exploison, being overloaded on to much helium it took few moments ago,


So far this has been a exercise in the law of diminishing returns.

Nothing against your almost anyones reply. Thanks

edit on 9-3-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-3-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:27 PM
link   
reply to post by defcon5
 


I think I spoke to soon, I can see two of them, one to the right of the black object, and one to the left of the sun. Maybe the light refracting of the planet heightened the distortion in the data?

I forgot to say thanks man.
edit on 9-3-2013 by rockymcgilicutty because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:34 PM
link   
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 

I think defcon5 is correct. IIRC, the answer will include "telemetry dropout".

I'm about 99.9% certain that's Venus on the right. The white lines are CCD blooming.

Here's another example of the dropout.





posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:39 PM
link   
reply to post by DenyObfuscation
 


I was also hoping you would drop in. I read many of you explanations, and thought they were correct. your timing was perfect. Yes I have comfirmation, now I can put this to rest.


Thank Guys



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 09:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 

I think defcon5 is correct. IIRC, the answer will include "telemetry dropout".

I'm about 99.9% certain that's Venus on the right. The white lines are CCD blooming.

Here's another example of the dropout.




Yes-- Venus according to the transit list

Transits
Transits of Objects through the LASCO/C3 field of view (FOV) in 2011
Jul18-Sep15 Venus -3.9 Right to Left

en.wikipedia.org...

The LASCO instruments are not the newest. They were built in the late 1980s, when a digital camera was something very special. Sometimes disturbances do happen.

There are two kinds that repeatedly occur:

Blackouts and Whiteouts, in broken lines, circle-like shapes, or over the whole picture. They are caused by the electronics box. There has never been a firmware update, since it was judged as too sensitive changing the flight-software.
Black and white pixels, occurring in patterns, without pattern or alone. Those "missing blocks" are telemetry dropouts, caused by radio interference or a disturbance in the data transfer to Goddard Space Flight Center.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:29 PM
link   
I've seen and discussed this image before. I can't find it now though.
It does appear to be a version of something that happens occasionally and that I've inquired about. First, notice the vertical line (more of a "disturbance") extending down from the right side of the thingy. Then notice a similar line extending below the Sun.

It seems to be a buffer overwrite situation. Part of a different image overlaying this one. I've checked. The glitch does not appear in the science level data. And, in that previous discussion, I found the image which is superimposed on this one. It's a few images before or after.

Simple answer: crapy software!

The software uses a circular buffer, and instead of nulling old images just overwrites them with new images once they become available. If there is a data gap, the old images remain in the buffer instead of being deleted. If the next DSN pass includes data from the onboard tape recorder (which can be several weeks old), the software sometimes gets confused and associates the header with a wrong image file.

I should emphasize that this affects only the quicklook data (quick and dirty near real-time data that are created on the fly for our web pages). The final level 0 science quality data in the SOHO science archive are correct.

Greetings,

Bernhard

--
==================================================================
Dr. Bernhard Fleck
SOHO Project Scientist, European Space Agency



Something like this. Not exactly the same though.
edit on 3/9/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2013 @ 01:16 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 



I looked at a sequence with that frame in it today, there is another patch I think beforehand, perhaps even another one later, all isolated frames though.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 04:20 AM
link   
Not sure what that is, cool pic though.






top topics



 
6
<< 1   >>

log in

join