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Inmate awarded $15.5 million for spending 22 months in solitary confinement

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posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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Explanation: S&F!

I am glad this lega issue was resolved in his favour but I am disgusted that the amount awarded was reduced!

Now that he has been compensated ... what punishments have been applied to the perpetrators of this henious crime?


Personal Disclosure: Because I would really like to know ok!




posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy

Originally posted by pacifier2012
Wow.Lock me up for 22 months. A $15 million dollar haircut would suit me fine.


I suggest finding a local immigrant from the old Soviet Russia and/or a Jew that experienced the concentration camps and ask them if 22 months is worth $15 million. The answers might surprise you.


I agree...almost two years in a small, silent, dark room watching your toenails grow, scraping fungus off your body...the mental damage has to be profound. The minutes must have felt like days. The 15 Million isn't meant to make this man "whole"...that is impossible. The money is meant to penalize the state of New Mexico enough to ensure this gets attention and something is done to ensure it doesn't happen again. Hopefully when the state writes the check, they also ask...who and what cost us this money?
edit on 8-3-2013 by Indigo5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 10:56 AM
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That is a lot of money.....but he was entitled to a) a speedy and fair trial, b) no cruel and unusual punishment and c) reasonable medical care under custody. I would think that 2.2 Million (22 mos x $100,000/Mo) should be enough. Remember, the local taxpayers are paying for this. Perhaps those directly involved should be forced to chip in to the kitty.......



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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Before you feel all bad for Monsieur Convict know that they intentionally do things to themselves to exacerbate their conditions. He had a plan and stuck to it and benefited from it financially.

Inmates, especially in segregation, routinely self-harm by refusing medical and dental care and by neglecting their hygiene. Their goal is financial compensation, time outside of their cell and trips to the hospital, which is their way of taking a vacation from the consequences of their actions (jail/prison).

Only those of us who have worked inside the fence see the deception on a daily basis and, therefore, are able to speak of it.

I'm sure I'll be vilified for this post but I don't really give a rat's *ss. Until you've worn the uniform you, the public, are blind.

Bleeding hearts line up to the left.



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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"Solitary confinement" isn't solitary. It just means that there's one inmate per cell. You are surrounded by other inmates whom you can, and do, talk to at all hours of the day and night.

Inmates sing, play chess, hollar, debate, abuse each other, and the staff, etc., 24/7.



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 12:57 PM
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Do you think I'd say such things for the hell of it?

The truth hurts.

Inmates in this country fare better here than in any other country in the world except the Scandanavian provinces.
edit on 3/8/2013 by Creep Thumper because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 06:02 PM
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I'm with creep. I don't condone leaving someone sit in a cell without a trial, but there are too many people who would use this story to push their overly warped theories of police state onto someone else. I also believe inmates will embellish the facts about how they were treated. Don't put yourself in a situation to go to prison in the first place. We all know it's a bad place even when treated normal.

My gut feeling is this guy is playing this out dishonestly. I didn't read the details because I know there is something fishy. Maybe the case file was lost or mislabeled? People that do these jobs to put food on the table aren't going to do something like this vindictively to this drunk driver..risking their careers. It's that simple.

Something fell through the cracks, likely do to the computerized holding of data, where people tap keys and don't really look at info. They should make him pay a 14million dollar fine for drunk driving and all the families who lost loved ones because of it.
edit on 8-3-2013 by Mailman because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-3-2013 by Mailman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 07:18 PM
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The jailor's and guard's on watch have commited gross human right's abuse and the state is responsible under international human right's law, the travesty is they had the cheek to appeal the original decision and his lawyer's accepted the reduced offer, he could have taken them to the international human right's court, the authority's responsible are criminal's.

On the 4th of august 1962 a Mr's Alice Mc.Ardle (whom was and is physically disabled), previousely Alice Leslie nee Hallworth-Fegan was arrested without charge and detained at Kirkby police station on Merseyside England. she was then moved to strangeways jail in Manchester England (no charge), she was then forced to sign document's relating to a very large inheritance she did not know she had and the money's that were her's were filtered to princess ******** (probably without the royal family's knowledge), the queen's ****** whom had no official income and the estate was simply fraudulently stolen.

Her inheritance was the substantial property's of the tattershall family and the title that was left to her in trust by lady Elizabeth tattershall her relative.

I know this because she is my mother and the former MP for west Lancashire mr ken hind told her it was that much money that no gentleman was above board and he could not help her any further, that any attempt to pursue the matter would be blocked by official circle's at every turn.

they have even destroyed record's of the tattershall's and effectively rewritten history, at least in America this poor guy could get compensation.

so injustice is every were but it is always inexcusable and evil.
edit on 8-3-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-3-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)
edit on 8-3-2013 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)
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edit on 8-3-2013 by LABTECH767 because: Because the people I accuse of a crime are powerfull and deviouse



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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Or we could all read for ourselves. I love the commentary we all take as if we were there, presented with all the evidence from both sides, in a court of law.

Getting transcripts isn't easy, but this will give you the trial brief, along with a few of the other documents relating to the case.

STEPHEN SLEVIN, Plaintiff, v. No. CIV 08-01185 MV/SMV BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS FOR THE COUNTY OF DOÑA ANA, et al., Defendants.

From the looks of it, he was placed into confinement, in a wing of the prison that was notoriously ill-equipped and hardly maintained. Couple that with a nurse practitioner who admittedly neglected his ethical duties, I am guessing that mt Slevin didn't have the best of treatment.

All that is moot though. He was denied due process. He was never given a trial on the original arrest and spent 22 months in prison for nothing; all charges were dropped. The State royally screwed the pooch on this one and the Board of Commissioners were held accountable.



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
"Solitary confinement" isn't solitary. It just means that there's one inmate per cell. You are surrounded by other inmates whom you can, and do, talk to at all hours of the day and night.

Inmates sing, play chess, hollar, debate, abuse each other, and the staff, etc., 24/7.


Except in this case, according to testimony, it was confinement and it was indeed solitary; no access to natural light and rarely was even a 1-hour "exercise" period given. Regardless if you can "hoot and holler" to others, you are subjected to dark, dank and lonely confinement without even ever charged or convicted of a crime.....but we can brush that off; I am sure he planned it out to make a cool million.



posted on Mar, 8 2013 @ 11:36 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
Wait,

I thought the US prided itself on being fair and humane with their treatment towards prisoners? This is absolutely inexcusable and the award states it as true.

And drunk driving to boot?


Peace


edit on 7-3-2013 by jude11 because: (no reason given)


I wouldn't necessarily call New Mexico "the US." New Mexico treats drunk driving VERY seriously...your FIRST offense is a felony and can put you in a state penitentiary for 5 years and set you back $50,000. That's your FIRST offense.

Other than that, this guy should have seen due process, sure. However, New Mexico is one of the poorest states in the nation, ranking pretty close to Louisiana at the bottom. That being said, they have very limited access to national funds and tax revenues to insure their systems are all in working order all of the time. So a guy got forgotten in a cell somewhere along the line and now he's a millionaire.

Where else in the world do you get THAT kind of treatment? He basically made $704,545/month, or $8,454,545 per year.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 12:52 AM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
"Solitary confinement" isn't solitary. It just means that there's one inmate per cell. You are surrounded by other inmates whom you can, and do, talk to at all hours of the day and night.

Inmates sing, play chess, hollar, debate, abuse each other, and the staff, etc., 24/7.


About 23 years ago, I landed in a county jail in New York State. During inmate visiting, one inmate ran across the room and began attacking another inmate. The guy being attacked was basically caught by surprise and did not even have time to react as he got his azz kicked. When the "Goon Squad" came in, they added insult to injury by going after him, thinking he was the instigator and continued to pummel the poor guy curled up on the floor and he screamed in pain. Amazingly, the attacker was largely ignored.

I was visiting with my father at the time in a community type visiting room.
Upon seeing all of this, and being the outspoken type, I jumped up out of my seat and started yelling, "Hey, you got the wrong guy, you're beating up the wrong guy!!!"

Well, then I became their target. They ran over to me, three of them. They lifted me up out of me seat and ran me head first into the wall knocking me unconscious. A few days later I had a disciplinary hearing and was given a 30 day sentence in "Administrative Segregation" ... solitary confinement for "obstructing security & safety"

There was no open window in my cell and it wasn't a cell in the way most people would think of. It had a door with a 12X12 window and a slot for a food tray which was closed from the outside. I was allowed out to shower once a day; I was to walk backward to the cell door, naked, was then cuffed and walked naked to the showers. Out of cell activity was outside in a large cage, by myself with a basketball hoop and a basketball, in my underwear and flip flops. 1 hour a day, but they made excuses every day and it turned out to be like twice a week. It was very quiet in the cell and there was NO WAY to communicate with anyone. I was given a book and could exchange that every three days, but other than eating, that was all I had.

I was in for possession of Marijuana and ended up doing 120 days.

Your comment is completely off base and may apply to the jail you are familiar with but not all jails in America. I was DEFINITELY in SOLITARY CONFINEMENT and definitely doing long and hard time, especially considering the thirty days came off my "good time" and actually did NOT count toward my sentence. People that think all sorts of abuse doesn't happen inside jails and prisons in America are in some serious delusion.

After getting out of solitary I almost wished I was back in there. The place was disgustingly over run with large roaches which wasn't a problem in the sealed room type cells of solitary. I remember waking up one night seeing a long crack in the wall that I couldn't remember being there in the daytime...it turned out to be literally a parade of roaches, each one about the size of my thumb. I slept very little.
edit on 9-3-2013 by odd1out because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 04:03 AM
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To the apologists of the prison system: if the jail keepers really believe that prisoners are playing the odds to gain sympathy and make it seem worse than it was, then perhaps the tenders of the jail should make their intentions absolutely unquestionable. You can try and inject uncertainty into it all you want, but the fact remains that the balance of power is such that these prisoners could be forcibly washed, forcibly manicured, forcibly given health care, and forcibly taken to court to actually, you know, be convicted of a crime.

Since none of that happened, I guess I'm supposed to take it on your word as one of the insiders of the "good guy" side that this was all part of his evil plan and those poor victims holding all the keys should be overlooked, because by golly they did their best and this man is taking advantage of the situation. Science knows better than that kind of argument from ignorance (One of you even admitted such!) These positions of power instill a toughness in people, because that's what's required to do the job, and responsibly so. But you neglect that there are people who intend to harm, and are attracted to this type of power imbalance.

Clearly we can't just write this off with nary a care, but we have to look at the evidence to decide what was just. If you can do that, and you stick to your assessment, then that's more than I could possibly ask of anyone. I don't expect it, however, because it takes a lot to extricate someone from prejudice. My request is, of course, assuming that you're being completely honest with us (and yourself) here.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by Connman
Terrible. I would like to know why no family or friends didn't do anything?
And I would also like to know how many people lost their jobs with such neglect that occurred to this man.

His family was in cintact for quite a while, but were rebuffed in their requests for info drom the Stae.

The prisoner eventually quit trying ti write, and gave in to his hopelessness. It was a renewed effor by the famiily tha eventually won his release.

Are you unable to use the lkinks, or to do basic research on your own? Must you be sppoin-fed everything before you get an answer? Do you velieve what I've posted without even takin a second look?

How pathetic.

jw



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
Before you feel all bad for Monsieur Convict know that they intentionally do things to themselves to exacerbate their conditions. He had a plan and stuck to it and benefited from it financially.

Inmates, especially in segregation, routinely self-harm by refusing medical and dental care and by neglecting their hygiene. Their goal is financial compensation, time outside of their cell and trips to the hospital, which is their way of taking a vacation from the consequences of their actions (jail/prison).

Only those of us who have worked inside the fence see the deception on a daily basis and, therefore, are able to speak of it.

I'm sure I'll be vilified for this post but I don't really give a rat's *ss. Until you've worn the uniform you, the public, are blind.

Bleeding hearts line up to the left.


Pure B.S. I've been aprosecutor, defender and have first-hand experience with what a "general population" and an "isolation" prisoner experience.

1. As proof of the ignorance of "corrections" employees here, this poster equates conviction with incarceration; a typical failure and proof of the lack of even basic knowledge of county jail staff. Typicaly, such buffoons treat convicts as (projected) trash, and visit their contempt upon those who are NOT convicted of anything, but merely detained. Jail employees are the lowest level of the Criminal Justice System, and the biggest failure of the model.

2. Pre-trial detention is not equal to "punishment." Some people are unable to qualify for pre-trial release, and therefore become "wards of the Stae," i.e., under the State's voluntary assumpotion of responsibility for health, safety and well-being.

3 If the inmate gave any indication of self-harm or neglect, the State, as his "guardian," was obligated to intervene.

4. Working "inside the fence" offer no opportuniters that are not available to the general public who want to know, and to those affiliated professional who DO know about the ignorance and abuse of "corrections officers." I have the experience to verify that 99% of "corrections officers" could not qualoify for "Certified Peace Officer" status due to lack of education, personal defects and psychological issues. They become jail guards to satify an internal craving for power and dominance. They are uniformly dangerous.

5. the incompetents who take these minimum wage guard jobs "don't give a rat's ass" about anything, because they wear a uniform. carry retraints and sometimes even have access to non-lethal weapons.

Unyil we rid our CJS of these thugs, we are doomed to repeat these failures.
Your refusal to acknowledge this basic obligation/right, is indicative of the brutality and ignorance of those semi-literate failures employed by the CJS as "corrections officers.".
In my extensive experience, jail guards are the lowest level of "corrections" employees; I refuse to call them "professionals," because they have not even the basic qualifications to be called such. they ar eusually one-step removed from licensed thuggery and incompetence.

.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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I've read these kind of comments before. I realize I'm in a position of being completely and utterly hated. What do you suppose that does to a person over time? Over decades?

I did the best job I could do and it was never good enough for people like you.

Did you die in your bed last night? You're welcome.

Guess what I got out of nearly three decades of verbal abuse? A couple of nervous breakdowns.

You go to work day after day to be spat on, called a lesbo/dyke/bitch/whore/motherf'er and see what it does to you.

Why did I do it? It paid the bills.

I cared for mentally ill inmates. In return they were mostly kind to me. It was when I had to work seg or GP that they were complete a-holes.

I'm not looking for sympathy. I wouldn't get it anyway. I'm saying that there are people who try to do the right thing no matter what it costs them and there are inmates who are masters at playing the system. I've seen it.

I don't deny that there are bad staff and archaic facilities. I can't do anything about that. Money is very tight and the abuse of staff has a great deal to do with turnover and quality of staff. Those bodies have to come from somewhere.

The system is broken, yes, but remember that there are two sides to every situation.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by jdub297
 


You sound more like an inmate than anything else. I think you're closer to a jailhouse lawyer than an attorney.

Your bitterness is too obvious.

I would love to be as ugly to you as you've been to me and mine, but that isn't my way.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 12:12 PM
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Ask me a question about how we do things. I'll answer it as long as it doesn't interfere with security.



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


We treat them so well that mistreatment is rewarded with millions.






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