Republican Party Too Extreme, Majority Of Americans Say: Poll

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posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by Hefficide



What good is a party of exclusion?


Nothing can come out of it. Period.

The Republicans have alienated their base. The Democrats have another Bush in office. Its Ironic to say the least. We need a new approach, cause this one, isn't working.




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by amfirst1
 


The fact that a person whose a member of a race that constitutes 13.9 percent of a countries population was actually elected and reelected, to be its leader has never happed in human history.

What you are saying makes no sense
edit on 4-3-2013 by Kashai because: added content



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by Kashai
reply to post by amfirst1
 


The fact that a person whose a member of a race that constitutes 13.9 percent of a countries population was actually elected and reelected, to be its leader has never happed in human history.

What you are saying makes no sense
edit on 4-3-2013 by Kashai because: added content


Wrong. Alberto Fujimori. Japanese. Elected President of Peru three times. Japanese compose of .3% of the Peruvian population.
edit on 4-3-2013 by GreenGlassDoor because:




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Kashai
reply to post by amfirst1
 


The fact that a person whose a member of a race that constitutes 13.9 percent of a countries population was actually elected and reelected, to be its leader has never happed in human history.


Regardless, Race isn't the issue with Obama, or his election or reelection.

I am more concerned that he is playing the same role Bush has played, and even trumping the "extremism". I can almost see the future, after his last year in office, we will hear of the Democrats being "Too Extreme" also.....That's if it all doesn't go down the drain, during his last years in office.. Just MHO.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by GreenGlassDoor

Originally posted by Kashai
reply to post by amfirst1
 


The fact that a person whose a member of a race that constitutes 13.9 percent of a countries population was actually elected and reelected, to be its leader has never happed in human history.

What you are saying makes no sense
edit on 4-3-2013 by Kashai because: added content


Wrong. Alberto Fujimori. Japanese. Elected President of Peru three times. Japanese compose of .3% of the Peruvian population.
edit on 4-3-2013 by GreenGlassDoor because:



We now have one other example in relation to about 10,000 years of recorded history



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


Implied is that Americans are so sick of what is going on in Washington. They are willing to elect a person that they are certain will cause the establishment to freak out.

And they have...



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


Benjamin Deisraeli. Jewish. Elected Prime Minister of the UK.

Alexander H. Stephens. Jewish. Vice President of the Confederate States of America.

Jalal Talabaani. Kurd. President of Iraq.

I could go on.
edit on 4-3-2013 by GreenGlassDoor because: (no reason given)
edit on 4-3-2013 by GreenGlassDoor because: Fixing Jalal's name.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by Kashai
reply to post by sonnny1
 


Implied is that Americans are so sick of what is going on in Washington. They are willing to elect a person that they are certain will cause the establishment to freak out.

And they have...


I dont think the American people are smart enough to elect someone that could actually change the status quo.

Proof?



They’re the sort of scores that drive high-school history teachers to drink. When NEWSWEEK recently asked 1,000 U.S. citizens to take America’s official citizenship test, 29 percent couldn’t name the vice president. Seventy-three percent couldn’t correctly say why we fought the Cold War. Forty-four percent were unable to define the Bill of Rights. And 6 percent couldn’t even circle Independence Day on a calendar.


How Dumb Are We? NEWSWEEK gave 1,000 Americans the U.S. Citizenship Test--38 percent failed. The country's future is imperiled by our ignorance.


So in retrospect, Even calling the Republicans extreme, means nothing when "We the People" have no real clue, whats going on.
edit on 4-3-2013 by sonnny1 because: spelling



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by GreenGlassDoor
 


I could go on as well and could begin with Babylon and the mythical Atlantis.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


Nice try at deflection. Your statement concerning minority elected to the head of state was disproven and rather than concede the point that you were and are wrong on the subject you want to bring up Babylonians and Atlantis which have nothing to do with anything.

Nobody can take you seriously.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


My impression is that electing a Black President in the US sends a message that is loud and clear.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by GreenGlassDoor
 


In relation to history the percentage of people who have been elected as leaders of a country, that are members of there population, that are considered a minority? is effectively irrelevant and my point is that such a situation in general is an example of extreme discontent upon the majority of that country.

It is an obvious point and more in keeping that the majority of Americans as sick and tired of the BS conservative agenda.

If that obvious point is way over your head that is not my problem

Understandably when the election occurred the Republican pundits were absolutely certain they would win. They did not win because the majority of Americans feel the Republican party is too extreme.




edit on 4-3-2013 by Kashai because: added content



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:28 PM
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If anything this conversation does show that race plays into it - and rather divisively I might add - on both sides. A few days ago, for example, in another thread a member posted "Heff is probably black
" to explain away my political opinions. The post was rightfully removed as off topic - but the message was clear to me, and to anyone who happened to have seen it before it disappeared.

There are Americans who truly do think that only blacks would vote for a non Republican. To me this is deeply disturbing. It shows that racism didn't really go away after the civil rights movement. It just got shoved into the closet - where it is living quite the fruitful life to this day.

The reason that this bothers me so much is that it plays to such negative stereotypes. The idea that the typical black person is a welfare cheat, with eighteen kids, lost in tears of joy because she got an Obama phone. I would like to think that anyone with more than eight brain cells, who doesn't have a relative named "Uncle Dad" would know better than this. But sometimes I wonder. Can we still be so ignorant, in this day and age, that two or three Youtube videos showing silliness or stupidity really serve as a basis for ones opinion of an entire segment of the population?

In short - if Republicans wish to have the "racist" label removed from the list of words outsiders use to describe them? Maybe they should make efforts to distance themselves from folks like the guy who said "Heff must be black.
" - as that statement cannot possibly be construed in any other way but as racist.

Oh, and for the record... I am half Irish, half Native American, and have lived my entire life checking "White" off in any box that asked for the information.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


Then state your point. Don't make some wild conjecture, get called to the carpet on it, try to deflect, get called to the carpet on that, and then claim that wasn't your point. It makes you look like a clown who doesn't know what they're talking about.

The point of communication is to clearly state your message. You don't do that with blanket statements. Especially ones that aren't true.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by Kashai
 


Do you do any other impressions? I can do Obama,Carter, Nixon,Reagan...But this presidency represents a clear and present danger to the United States.They threatened the wrong demographic as terrorists.ME.
I couldn't care less about what the progs say THEY AREN'T ARMED enough,and evidently they are incapable of mass combat anyway.They sure are the best obstructionists going however.They can show up and protest bacon if they get a chance and say they are the majority,cause CNN put out a poll from PETA.
Those of you who think ANY non center Dem has a chance in 2016,haven't checked their history.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by GreenGlassDoor
reply to post by Kashai
 


I am going to have to ask you to substantiate that whole Death Row inmates were unwanted Pregnancies as discovered by the Supreme Court bit. Never heard that one before.


I can't source that but in the documentary freakanomics they highlighted the fact that after abortion was legalized in the New York the crime rate in New York City dropped substantially when the next generation reached the age where most criminals begin activity. The mayor of course took credit at the time but we know better heres a tidbit.


Steven Levitt of the University of Chicago and John Donohue of Yale University revived discussion of this claim with their 2001 paper "The Impact of Legalized Abortion on Crime". Donohue and Levitt point to the fact that males aged 18 to 24 are most likely to commit crimes. Data indicates that crime in the United States started to decline in 1992. Donohue and Levitt suggest that the absence of unwanted children, following legalization in 1973, led to a reduction in crime 18 years later, starting in 1992 and dropping sharply in 1995. These would have been the peak crime-committing years of the unborn children. The authors argue that states that had abortion legalized earlier and more widespread should have the earliest reductions in crime. Donohue and Levitt's study indicates that this indeed has happened: Alaska, California, Hawaii, New York, Oregon and Washington experienced steeper drops in crime, and had legalized abortion before Roe v. Wade. Further, states with a high abortion rate have experienced a greater reduction in crime, when corrected for factors like average income.[4] Finally, studies in Canada and Australia purport to have established a correlation between legalized abortion and overall crime reduction.[4]


Source

So its likely that it is true that death row inmates were unwanted.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:38 PM
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reply to post by acmpnsfal
 


I remember seeing the Freakonomics report, but haven't seen an investigation by the Supreme Court prior to Roe v Wade. So... it doesn't exist?



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by GreenGlassDoor
 


My point is simple, by electing a black man as President the majority of our population elected a person that would upset the status quo. I mean seriously we have a member of congress suggesting that a womans body cannot get pregnant is she is really being raped.
as the Governor of Louisiana made clear, today the Republican party is the "Stupid Party" this is why the Majority of Americans say it is too extreeme.

Any thoughts?



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by acmpnsfal
 


Perhaps you should work on your Boolean terms...




Abstract

Rates of serious crime in the United States dropped greatly throughout the 1990s for virtually all offenses. John Donohue and Steven Levitt have argued that this reduction relates strongly to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized the abortion of unwanted pregnancies. If such pregnancies result in children with higher lifetime risks of criminality, then the greater ability to terminate these pregnancies after 1973 should reduce crime rates. The purpose of this article is to empirically assess Donohue and Levitt’s basic premise that unwanted pregnancies result in children with significantly higher risk for law-violating behavior. This analysis addresses two questions. First, do children born of an unwanted pregnancy become more highly involved in juvenile delinquency during adolescence and criminal behavior during early adulthood? Second, do the consequences of unwanted pregnancies depend upon the social and demographic characteristics of the child and family? The authors address these two questions with panel data gathered from a national sample of children born prior to Roe v. Wade.


Source



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by Kashai
reply to post by GreenGlassDoor
 


My point is simple, by electing a black man as President the majority of our population elected a person that would upset the status quo. I mean seriously we have a member of congress suggesting that a womans body cannot get pregnant is she is really being raped.
as the Governor of Louisiana made clear, today the Republican party is the "Stupid Party" this is why the Majority of Americans say it is too extreeme.

Any thoughts?


Yeah, that guy isn't in Congress anymore. Todd Akin wasn't elected to the Senate and gave up running to the House to do so.

Governor Jindal, if we look at in context, said,


We've got to stop being the stupid party and I'm serious. It's time for a new Republican Party that talks like adults. It's time for us to articulate our plans and our visions for America in real terms. It's no secret we had a number of Republicans that damaged the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. I'm here to say we've had enough of that. We must quit big.

We are not the party of big business, big banks, big Wall Street bailouts, big corporate loop holes or big anything. We must not be the party that simply protects the well off so they can keep their toys. We've got to be the party that shows all Americans how they can thrive. We're the parties ideas will help the middle class and help more folks join the middle class.


Which is true.


It is kind of ironic that you brought up another minority, Gov. Jindal, who was elected as head of state for Louisiana. Add him to your list.






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