50 cals, dipped in uranium?

page: 3
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join

posted on May, 18 2014 @ 09:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Wrabbit2000
reply to post by txinfidel
 

It's probably not what he meant but something occurred to me. It would be useful in one way. If used in a very narrow and specific way, it would be a marker to track on all .50 rifles. I'm probably too conspiratorial minded sometimes though. lol....


This is what i was thinking, you cant scrub off radiation like you can a serial number.




posted on May, 18 2014 @ 01:39 PM
link   
a reply to: txinfidel

Considering he is a Vietnam era vet I am sure he confused some things. I know some units would drill out the cores of bullets and put a few drops of mercury in them and then seal them up for explosive impact. As far as dipping them in anything goes that wouldn't make any sense.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 01:46 PM
link   
A little known facts is that these munitions were used extensively in Iraq and Afghanistan. The birth defect percentage skyrocketed in these countries, after the U.S. led invasion. Depleted uranium rounds are the main cause. This stuff is the most deadly substance known to man. It effects all who come in contact with it. I feel so sorry for those innocent children. If there is a hell, the perpetrators will burn eventually. Khod sees everything. Nothing misses her gaze.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 01:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Biigs

Something else just occurred to me as an application for it, although even our side isn't quite this nasty. Yet, anyway....

You could pretty easily seed munitions in and amongst enemy forces that were lightly radioactive. Not enough for immediate impact, but enough for mid-long term. How many forces with limited resources are carrying exposure detection equipment as a routine thing? One captured rifle could be handled by a lot of people...

An example was called Project Eldest Son, although I've always read about it referred to as "Italian Green" in Vietnam. That was sabotage of munitions to kill the holder with a trusted weapon, without the radioactive aspect this would suggest of course.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 02:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: Wrabbit2000
a reply to: Biigs

Something else just occurred to me as an application for it, although even our side isn't quite this nasty. Yet, anyway....

You could pretty easily seed munitions in and amongst enemy forces that were lightly radioactive. Not enough for immediate impact, but enough for mid-long term. How many forces with limited resources are carrying exposure detection equipment as a routine thing? One captured rifle could be handled by a lot of people...

An example was called Project Eldest Son, although I've always read about it referred to as "Italian Green" in Vietnam. That was sabotage of munitions to kill the holder with a trusted weapon, without the radioactive aspect this would suggest of course.



Well, officers and politicians know full well who would be actually handling DU munitions on their own side. Take a Geiger counter to an Abrams.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 02:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Wrabbit2000

Hey thats out of the box and definitely not above certain country's....

Good [or should i say] Bad, idea Wabbit.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 10:44 PM
link   

originally posted by: Oannes
Depleted uranium rounds are the main cause. This stuff is the most deadly substance known to man.

Complete BS. Lots of stuff is more toxic than DU.

Ranb



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 11:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Ranb40

DU rounds in Bradleys are purple tipped,standard AP ammo penetrated a T-72 at point blank,we didn't need DU and there were none issued in 1/7 Cav. Apaches use it ,tanks and A-10s used it .We had to clear areas of hostiles so we walked in that stuff.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 11:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam




That doesn't make sense, but no, they're not dipped in uranium. Why would you? I have two, by the way.



Now, I do like to fire ball ammo that's been dipped in molybdenum, keeps the barrel nice and shiny. No uranium, though.



Edit to add: if your buddy is thinking that they can then track it by radiation, well, uranium's not very radioactive. Even non-depleted uranium. You can stand on an infinite plane of raw uranium and never hit your rad limit. The half-life tells the tale, when it's in billions of years, it's not very radioactive.


Amen on the dry moly, Bedlam.. If it's good for breaking in a new
camshaft it's gotta really be the cat's for muzzle velocity. Just please,
keep doing it; because it gets gooey/galled in there when you stop.

But even dusting the whole outside of a .50 with uranium dust would
last about as long as -- how many handlings of the weapon?
I don't get it. And for the rounds, lead melts a lot sooner than U23x's.
That would be about like dipping a marshmallow in smokin' veggie oil.

No Edit Required --- an' he's got TWO. sigh.





new topics
top topics
 
3
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join