Well look at this the Queen's nurses belt buckle.

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posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by ajay59
 


You are the one leading the goose chase when the symbols have nothing to do with Satanism, do some research eh? you will find out their meaning or just read the thread again....
Bloody people on ATS at the moment everything is to do with Satan...pfft.




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by HelenConway
...she probably trained somewhere like the Royal Masonic Hospital In north London - now closed.


Found it. You are exactly right. Here is a link to an image of the Royal Masonic Hospital's Nursing Buckle which is in the London Museum.



edit on 4-3-2013 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by ajay59
reply to post by MysterX
 




Pentagram So, it goes back a long way and has associations with many groups, including but not limited to pagans or masons. Besides, i thought it was common knowledge the Queen was head of UK freemasonry...or is that just me?


Yet here he we see these symbols side by side. Explain that away!

Its all in the context. The star next to the masonic square represents the "Eastern Star", the female version of Masonry. In its presented context it has the highest approval of the Queen because she is allowing it to be seen next to her, but not on her. It signify s she is the Head of both but too timid to wear it herself. That would be admitting to much publicly.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


Spot on with your comment there....


After World War I the Freemason’s Hospital and Nursing Home opened in the Fulham Road premises and accepted its first patient in 1920. Despite alterations this site proved too small and supporters continues their efforts to find a larger site. Once sufficient funds were secured a site was purchased at Ravenscourt Park, West London. In 1933, King George V and Queen Mary opened the hospital and the King granted permission for it to be known as the Royal Masonic Hospital.


Royal Masonic Hospital

en.wikipedia.org...

news.bbc.co.uk...




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:47 PM
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King Edward VII...

couldn't be because he was a freemason that a nurse working at his name sake hospital wears such icons.

nawww, she's a lizard. probably eats the babies in the maternity ward. She's angry at the queen who's just scoffed the entire wards cache of infants.

Blasted royals, they don't even leave the bones...



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Sublimecraft
 




I need to put more effort into my google-fu. That's the exact info I wanted to find, but this coffee is not working fast enough.

Good work mate!!




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


But she would NOT be wearing the belt from the hospital that she trained in. She would be wearing the uniform (complete with its belt) that nurses wear at the Edward VII Hospital attended by the Queen, Sorry. Case not closed. Case still open.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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Originally posted by Exitt
reply to post by OtherSideOfTheCoin
 


Thank you for your explanation.
Nurses here don't wear any belt whatsoever so to see her rocking a red one .. let's just say it's the newest trend in fashion called colorblocking

The buckle though, i trust your explanation it is not unusual to wear, it still remains uncommon designed buckle.
Nice find OP.


I'd imagine the nurses belt and buckle tradition, especially in the case fo private hospitals with close ties to the military is just as member 'HelenConway' says above..it mirrors Army traditions.

When i was in the Army, we also had to 'earn' our Stable Belt and Beret, before we could 'pass out' as fully part of our regiment.
(not get blind drunk and pass out, that came later!)

The buckle is a very similar tradition and again closely tied to the military tradition of Beret or 'cap' badges, each regiment of the British Army uses to identify and distinguish itself.

It's more or less the same thing with the Nurses' belt and buckle as it is for the Army squaddie.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:52 PM
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Secret societies, black budgets, redacted files released, it's all the same. If you have nothing to hide, you should have nothing to fear! Obviously all these people have something to fear, hence the need for secrecy. It is also peculiar that many times, all these people who hold secrets dear, seem to have connections!



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


She is also wearing a 'jewel' on her chest
from your link

Jewel for lady patrons after the opening of the hospital. Generally similar to the above, but this is a single casting in silver gilt and enamel, with the monogram changed to ‘RMH’, for ‘Royal Masonic Hospital’. Other versions of this jewel and the one described above exist with slight variations.


These things are worth a lot of money. Pretty cool history too, makes a hell of an heirloom. Why did Masons make such nice things for doctors and nurses?

edit on 4-3-2013 by Exitt because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
reply to post by HelenConway
 


But she would NOT be wearing the belt from the hospital that she trained in. She would be wearing the uniform (complete with its belt) that nurses wear at the Edward VII Hospital attended by the Queen, Sorry. Case not closed. Case still open.


Indeed! In most any hospital around the world, this nurse would be out of uniform. Maybe this hospital only caters to the elite or their minions?



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


I am sure you are right - it was the same in many NHS hospitals too - especially the old ones who had their roots in a pre NHS time.

It is not so any more though - after the 90s nurses stopped wearing buckles and hospital badges etc, they went the way of the dodo.

Now they wear horrible overalls or scrubs or whatever - but not silver badeges or hats or belts or buckles [ generally - the hospital the Queen was at is old school]



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
reply to post by HelenConway
 


But she would NOT be wearing the belt from the hospital that she trained in. She would be wearing the uniform (complete with its belt) that nurses wear at the Edward VII Hospital attended by the Queen, Sorry. Case not closed. Case still open.
King Edward VII was Grand Master of the United Grand Lodge of England from 1874–1901. So?



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
reply to post by HelenConway
 


But she would NOT be wearing the belt from the hospital that she trained in. She would be wearing the uniform (complete with its belt) that nurses wear at the Edward VII Hospital attended by the Queen, Sorry. Case not closed. Case still open.


Yes she would - nurses wear the belt buckle from the hospital they trained in - they earn their buckle - it is silver..
I know what I am talking about mate !

Especially the old traditional hospitals - the buckle went in the 90s as I have stated but Kind Edward Hospital still has the old style uniform and yes she would wear her training buckle - she is proud of it, she worked hard for it.

CASE CLOSED !

edit on 4-3-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by Exitt
These things are worth a lot of money. Pretty cool history too, makes a hell of an heirloom. Why did Masons make such nice things for doctors and nurses?


I am not going to pretend I am familiar with how the nursing buckles work in Britain but I would hazard to say that all of them were made by foundries that cast all types of metallic adornments and this one was probably part of the standard catalogue of items for a particular foundry.

Waterbury Buckle in the United States dated back to before the Civil War and made belts, buttons, badges, medallions and other cast decorative items for the military and private citizens in all styles and forms. I do not think that this was made specifically by Masons.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by Exitt
 


Erm maybe because they save peoples lives? and so they made them nice things.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


I agree - some of those buckle and badges would be 100s of years old by design or at least back to Flo Nightingale so say 100 years. It would be specialist companies making them as you say.

Of course they are not made anymore.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 




and yes she would wear her training buckle - she is proud of it, she worked hard for it.


nobody is saying that she didn't work hard for it. We just wonder how many children she had to sacrifice to earn it!



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


It's a shame imo.

I'd imagine people would campaign about it, but the slogan 'Bring back the belt' sounds a bit dodgy.


They looked much better in a proper uniform, not just in that way, but more professional, tidy.

Ah well...progress i s'pose.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


Many moons ago, I trained as a nurse when I was 18 - finished age 21 in London. I had to earn my silver hospital badge,

In those days - nurses were young and slim.[ 1980s]

Nowadays not so - you need to be slim to look good in belts and buckles





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