ADHD Doesn't Go Away

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posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by nomnom
 


If you want to sleep well then burn opium incense about an hour before you go to sleep.




posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Look at your own freaking links.

The first one clearly states that the frontal cortex is 1/3 of the mass of the brain. He continues to state that many abnormalities may be found in people labeled ADHD IN DIFFERENT AREAS. He does NOT say what percentage of people not diagnosed with ADHD has at least one abnormality within the same brain region. He says they DO NOT know what causes it, and that it may be ENVIONMENTAL, or GENETIC.

HOW THE HELL ARE WE GIVING SPEED FOR MANY SECTIONS OF 1/3 of the BRAIN THAT MAY HAVE FORMED ABNORMALLY, YET MAY BE ENVIRONMENTAL IN CAUSE>

HOW THE HELL IS THAT EVEN REMOTELY ETHICAL, OR SCIENTIFIC???

edit on 4-3-2013 by nomnom because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:42 PM
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Just looking at some of the data and it appears the cases of ADHD become more prevalent the further east you go in America. Look at the map in this link. It certainly seems medication is prescribed more the further east in the USA you live.
www.cdc.gov...

Also mentioned in this video. How can that be explained?



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


Blue States. Liberal indoctrination. These kids are being institutionalized and deprived of their natural gifts.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by nomnom
 


I don't pretend to know how medication helps, except I've been told by a neurologist that for some reason, it calms that part of the brain.

I can tell you the difference I see when a child truly has ADHD and skips a dose. The difference is night and day. I have first graders, so they're already hyper and we do lots of dancing and physical movement during the day. But one of my students has ADHD, and on the days he's had his medicine, he's a typical student. He can focus, read a small book,mod his work.

Last week he came to school without his medicine (out of refills). That day was horrible, not just for him but for the whole class.

He was commando crawling around the floor, could not stay in his seat, broke every crayon in his box and threw them across the room. He put his glue sticks in our fish tank (I got them out quickly so hopefully no damage). At lunch he threw his food all over the place, punched another student, and threw his milk at me when I tried to get him to stop.

That was also the day we were having a sight word contest. Little guy had been practicing hard for weeks, and in our practice runs had done well. Unfortunately, he could not even stand in the line and was disqualified by the moderator.

I took him out into the hall to do some breathing exercises and try to calm him down. He burst into tears, threw his arms around my neck, and sobbed that "he didn't want to be bad, he just couldn't help it."

This child has ADHD. It's real, and his medicine helps him cope.

So yeah, it's real.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


As I mentioned earlier, I do think ADHD is over diagnosed. I have a personal theory, concerning the amount of recess/physical education these children get. Basically, since there is more emphasis on passing standardized tests, schools have cutback on "special classes" so students get more academics. This includes reducing PE and even eliminating recess

Young children NEED unstructured play and physical movement. It's just part of being a child.

As for the prevalence in the East, I would be interesting in learning more about that as its new to me. Off to watch your link,



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


What is real, is children who are different, being forced to conform to your institutions standards of educational performance.

WHY must that kid do well within your institution to be a good kid?

WHY must that kid do well within your institution to be successful in life?

HOW are we going to have creative geniuses in this world if we ALL must conform to the same standards?

It makes no freaking sense, and no a child rewiring his brain with speed does not prove a "disorder" exists. It proves you are biased.
edit on 4-3-2013 by nomnom because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by nomnom
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


What is real, is children who are different, being forced to conform to your institutions standards of educational performance.

WHY must that kid do well within your institution to be a good kid?

WHY must that kid do well within your institution to be successful in life?

HOW are we going to have creative geniuses in this world if we ALL must conform to the same standards?

It makes no freaking sense, and no a child rewiring his brain with speed does not prove a "disorder" exists. It proves you are biased.
edit on 4-3-2013 by nomnom because: (no reason given)


HOW is that child going to be successful in life when he cannot read?

HOW is he going to share his creative genius if he cannot negotiate society's expectations?

HOW is he going to be able to develop that genius if he doesn't have the skills to harness his creativity?

The best case scenario, in my opinion, is to first...get an accurate diagnosis. This isn't as easy as it sounds. I teach in a low income, high crime area. Some parents tell their children to misbehave just so they can get that rx....which is then sold on the street. But that's a different problem.

So, a child has an accurate diagnosis. The doctor should then, in ADDITION to the medication route, make sure the child receives therapy. The therapist helps the child learn strategies to help him focus, etc. then. As the child matures, he is taken off the medicine and uses what he's learned in therapy to balance.

But that's hard work....so lots of folks toss pills and say that's all that's needed. That's the prevalent attitude, and it's a bad one.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl

HOW is that child going to be successful in life when he cannot read?


What percentage of people diagnosed with this "adhd" are illiterate, who don't take speed?

Bull#.


HOW is he going to share his creative genius if he cannot negotiate society's expectations?


I don't know, why don't you ask the majority of dead geniuses whose work wasn't accepted in their own time, yet is paramount to the way we understand things today.


HOW is he going to be able to develop that genius if he doesn't have the skills to harness his creativity?


Good question. What does this have to do with being institutionalized?


Guess what happened in my family? Nobody graduated high school. We were all bored out of our minds.

Brother is a professional skydiver, and artist.

Mother is an executive VP of an apartment leasing company.

Father runs his own plumbing business dealing with new construction on franchises.

I dabble in a little bit of everything, but am trying to excel in the corporate world, atm (super difficult, but needs ma spinaches)

Just asked my father what he thought of ADHD, he gave me one word, "conformity", then whizzed past me to go get # done for the day.

Dude would definitely have been diagnosed ADHD if the label was "discovered" sooner.

We live next to a NASA scientist, and a doctor + lawyer couple.

We weren't institutionalized, that's how.
edit on 4-3-2013 by nomnom because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by nomnom
 


Who's talking about institutionalizing anyone?

ADHD doesn't require institutionalizing someone.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


I agree that today's educational system needs to catch up with the technology the children are used to.

My school system is spending all our money on technology. We don't use dry erase boards anymore, but an interactive whiteboard that can access the Internet.

I have a class set of nooks and chrome books that my kids use daily.

Our classrooms have changed since even fifteen years ago, when I started teaching. Which is, for the most part, a good thing.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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Real ADHD is a serious problem and the meds do work well for this. There are a lot of misdiagnosed cases out there though, general practitioners without specific training giving out meds for a disease they perceive because of the symptoms. Meds often cause side effects if the problem is misdiagnosed, when meds are used by some without the problem they initially seem to work but later side effects emerge. These effects make the person irrational sometimes and sick others. ADHD has different origination sometime, ADHD is a symptom.

Keep an eye on your brother for a while and see if he gets any negative personality changes. It is hard for a person on mind altering chemistry to see how meds effect their perceptions.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 03:56 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:22 PM
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I can attest that ADHD is a very real disorder.


I will never be convinced this is a disorder. It is normal to not be able to focus on somethings because your mind is on something else. Taking drugs just to make it easier to teach or focus is part of the reason we have so many weak minded drug addicts in our society looking for crutches for everything thats a little hard.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by jinni73
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


It doesn't go away cos it doesn't exist in the first place. just eliminate all the sugar, carbs and fluoride from his diet
and give him foods high in anti-oxidents tomatoes are especially good.



And what proof do you have that it isn't real and that your so called remedy is the key?

Like the OP said those who dismiss is are usually those who don't have it or have never dealt with anyone who does have it. I"m a 34yr old adult female with it and it is a pain in the rear. You are just like those who say depression isn't real and that you should just get out of the house, well it doesn't work like that and neither does ADHD. I don't take meds because I am not a fan of medication period. I don't like how it makes me feel not like myself. I have managed my ADHD on my own and like some other members have said it has given them some benefits in life and i will agree with that.

Don't dismiss something just because you don't understand it or aren't dealing with it personally. You have no idea.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by soundguy
 


I'm not a troll. Amphetamines are known by their street name as "speed". I realize that in those who have different brain structures than some, it causes them to slow down and focus. It weakens their potential, yet makes them able to do dumbed-down school work.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 05:13 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 



I can tell you the difference I see when a child truly has ADHD and skips a dose. The difference is night and day. I have first graders, so they're already hyper and we do lots of dancing and physical movement during the day. But one of my students has ADHD, and on the days he's had his medicine, he's a typical student. He can focus, read a small book,mod his work.

Last week he came to school without his medicine (out of refills). That day was horrible, not just for him but for the whole class.


You understand withdrawals don't you - did you ever consider that's what this kid is suffering from on the days he doesn't have his meds?

I was taught to expect no more than 5 minutes of attention from any five year old - that's normal developmentally - and yet in this day and age we regard it as being acceptable to give addictive stimulants to an, as yet, undeveloped mind?? And you think that's acceptable?

ADHD is a grouping of behaviours that annoys parents and teachers. It may, in very few cases, exist as a neurological disorder, but to claim that it affects as many children as are currently being drugged is simply outrageous.

My children are now adults - thankfully they grew up before this new fashion for drugging kids took off. And that is all it is....a fashion.....years from now we'll look back on this period of time in absolute horror. I know 2 kids who are prescribed adhd meds. One of them is the son of a chronically depressed mother who can't stand the 'mess' her son leaves i.e. toys on the bedroom floor. The other is the son of a drunken drug dealer (who regularly sticks his fist thru walls) who loves the fact his son is given these drugs because he now receives more money in state benefits. The problem in these cases is definitely with the parents.....and the children pay the price.

Now, when I was at school and a kid started playing up in class the school adopted the approach that this was a bright kid who was being under stimulated by the school curriculum. Their work level was raised - as well as expectations. In these days of pretend education is it any wonder that the kids are lashing out?

edit on 4-3-2013 by christina-66 because: (no reason given)





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