Need some advice from the smart minds of ATS!

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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 03:45 PM
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There are a lot of smart minds here at ATS so I need a little advice on education for our son. He was born in late September and is three years old right now. We decided to have him screened to see if he was ready for Pre-Kindergarten class this fall. The way it works is that if your child is born after Sept. 1, they are too late for that class and must wait for the next year. That’s how it works here in Wisconsin. He is well-advanced for his age. I’m not saying a genius or anything like that, but definitely ready for Pre-K this fall, so the question isn’t whether he could go to school yet, just whether he should.

If he goes early, he would be one of the youngest in class, but if he waits, he would be one of the oldest.

Most everyone has been advising my wife and I not to enroll him yet and wait for the next year. Even the school psychologist doesn’t want him to start, but the Pre-K teacher does. I’ve had family and co-workers even suggest that it’s not what’s best for the kid because of social skills and all that later on, per say, middle school years. I know that he wouldn’t be behind in sports either, because his motor skills are advanced as well, and he is larger than most three-year olds to.

My wife and I figured that he should go early because we didn’t want him to get bored if he was more advanced and not being challenged with what he was learning. With all the naysayers, we’re becoming more hesitant and not sure what to do. Back in the day, parents used to put kids in early all the time, but this practice is frowned upon now and this school district here hasn’t put a child into Pre-K early in seven years.

I’m just wondering if any of you have dealt with this situation with your own children. If so, what did you do and how has it worked out for your child? Appreciate any help ATS!




posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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i was put in kindergarten at 4 years old. same situation for me. had they waited till i was 5, i would've been the oldest in the class for most of the school year. it might have its advantages to let him wait the extra year, because he will have the wisdom of his advanced years hehe, to help him, although he may get bored easier. could work though if you give him advice on how to be a fair and equitable leader of his peers
edit on 2-3-2013 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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Given the choice, I'd say you could use the extra time to home school to the level you personal feel appropriate before he enters school and then he ought to go through at something of a pre-built advantage the rest of the time. His to lose, but it would start that way, anyway.

I assume you're stuck with public schools like most of the rest of us, right?



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:03 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


I suggest that you get as much information as possible about what it is they teach in those classes and simply do the instruction at home with him. Kids of that age are much more responsive to in house, family orientated learning anyway.

The issue of age won't matter as long as he's up to the same, or better level than the rest of the kids.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


He's too young. Wait one more year. It doesn't mean he can't start his education at home. There are lots of educational software and websites he can use under your supervision. That's what I did with my daughter.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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You might have seen this coming. You realize that many of us here believe that the American "educational" system has been designed to incrementally train kids to be good, obedient worker-bees?

Maybe this will help:




edit on 3/2/2013 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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I started school early. I never had a problem with being the youngest, nor with the school work. Only problems I did have (still have) is penmanship and spelling.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
Given the choice, I'd say you could use the extra time to home school to the level you personal feel appropriate before he enters school and then he ought to go through at something of a pre-built advantage the rest of the time. His to lose, but it would start that way, anyway.

I assume you're stuck with public schools like most of the rest of us, right?


Yeah, we prefer not to send him to public school but for the time, we live in rural America where there isn't much choice. For now we intend to send him to public school and then later, prior to high school years we are going to make sure to get him somewhere else where he stands a chance, ya know. But, of all the public schools in the area, the town we live in does have the best. Especially for sports...they rank tops in the state in multiple sports for the small school divisions. That works to his benefit because he'll get plenty of playing time in sports plus attention from coaches. But, like I said, if he does excel in sports, I'll have to get him to big school by high school, or an excellent private school, so he'll get noticed.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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My daughter was born in July and we waited. We have a close friend who is a pre-school teacher with decades of experience, and she advised us to wait even though daughter was well within the _ For us it was a good thing. Daughter could have easily hacked it intellectually, but the added confidence she had all the way through school by being a little older rather than a little younger did a tremendous amount for her self-esteem and confidence. Maybe too much as she is a handfull. There's no real rush in the matter. It's not a race. Enjoy your kid.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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That was supposed to be George Carlin's "American Dream" routine. Anybody know why Youtube video links aren't working?



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Most everyone has been advising my wife and I not to enroll him yet and wait for the next year. Even the school psychologist doesn’t want him to start...

I was born late in the year too. Better to start next year. It won't be noticed as much as if you start a year early. Kids already have problems with the "big kids". But at least the kids in class are not older. See?

A year early is too young. They get picked on. A year older and you don't get noticed. Don't rush it. For his sake, wait.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


what we did with our kids was order the home schooling materials from a school in a nearby large city. it was a pace system (they test where they are at academically in each subject, and start them in work booklets gauged for that level, so it's customized for each student's abilities). then we put them in karate classes in a local dojo, for their phys ed. the oldest son is now a 3rd degree black belt and sensei in okinawan goju ryu, the middle son is a brown belt and the youngest, our daughter, is almost a brown belt. not that belts mean much, but it did give them a great deal of exercise, hand eye coordination, social interaction and practice in disciplining your body.
edit on 2-3-2013 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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We live in a different day and age now when it comes to learning. No longer are we only subjected to the one sided opinions of what is taught in books and old videos. Worrying about fitting in and learning a standard lesson plan does not fit the requirements of knowledge that are needed to prevail in such a high technology World we live in.

In present time, the internet is available. Along with endless amounts of research capabilities, there is also the added benefit of connecting with anyone in the World in a matter of seconds. I think parents of this day and age are keenly unaware of just how much smarter and advanced our children are going to be than us, as adults.

So, my belief on education is to not put a standard on our children... no matter the age. I feel it's equally important for adults to not inflict an outcome of their advancing brains... meaning we should really avoid implementing ANY views, opinions, or standards that would sway the ability for a child to learn for themselves. It is so important, in my opinion, due to the fact that they will not be living to the same standard/substandard when they become adults.

I believe parenting is going to be much easier for the parents that simply ask very deep questions to even the youngest of their children, then sit back and see how amazed they are as the kids learn knowledge at up to 100 times the rate that we did as children. When they answer, congratulate them for be concerned with knowledge to encourage them, and ask another question of importance. I think it will not only allow make them smarter than we could imagine, but will also aid in the knowledge that we adults will not be able to obtain in years forthcoming.

Personally, my children will not attend school in a typical fashion. I will ask questions that are well beyond their years of speculated obtainment, and help them find where to look for more answers to the subject. Their social skills will be developed by participating in charity and volunteering events. I feel I would be doing a disservice to my child by putting a limit or timeline to their learning. I don't want my children to be "standardized."

I stumbled upon an Indian doctor who performed many experiments with this philosophy in mind. He essentially left a computer in a town that kids never seen of heard of computers. He left it for use and never explained what or how any of the computers even operated. He expected them to learn absolutely nothing from it, but was amazed at how much knowledge was obtained by just asking questions and letting the children figure it out for themselves. I was amazed myself! There is a TED talk episode that explains the experiment well.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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Based on my experience with children, I advise you to wait.

Let him be a child a little longer before. Pre-k and up, playtime is structured and children learn best through unstructured play.

If you're worried about him staying ahead, read to him every night. Research shows a direct correlation between reading levels and success in school. So if he can get a head start on his reading, he'll be good to go. And reading to him every night will do this.

Good luck, and bless you for being such a caring parent.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:37 PM
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In europe, we go to school from the age of 2.5, we have 3 prep yrs and then we go to 1st grade, i skipped a grade because of that preparation, so my advice would be to homeschool every single child to think logically. Also make an application to do an IQ test at the school you choose
. I have an above average iq, but then again i also have a mild form of autism(not taking meds for obvious reasons)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 
That's true, but she can apply to do an iq test to see if he's able to learn fast or not, it all comes to ethics in the end though, but if the child has an above average iq, it'll be hard not to get bored fast in school, trust me on that



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Most everyone has been advising my wife and I not to enroll him yet and wait for the next year. Even the school psychologist doesn’t want him to start...

I was born late in the year too. Better to start next year. It won't be noticed as much as if you start a year early. Kids already have problems with the "big kids". But at least the kids in class are not older. See?

A year early is too young. They get picked on. A year older and you don't get noticed. Don't rush it. For his sake, wait.


With us, I don't worry about him being the small kid in class because his size for his age is 90%. He's taller than pretty much every kid we've ever met his age. We've been harassed where kids eat free or get in free because they believed he was older. I actually argued with a waitress once at a buffet when he was 2. It was 2 and under eat free but he carried on a conversation with her and with his size to, she didn't believe he was only 2. I refused to pay for him because any parent with a kid that age knows they eat about two teaspoons full of food and that's it.

My only worry is that if he already knows everything that's being taught if he waits a year then he may not be stimulated when he does go. My wife and I thought it would be better to keep him challenged to learn at each grade level. But, we also see the other side now as well, the benefits to waiting and being a leader in the class. It's a tough call.
edit on 2-3-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by VoicingOut
 


Oh, I agree. Public school has a LOT of problems (and I'm a public school teacher).

And someone tried to put you on medication for autism? That's a first in my experience.

My son may be on the autism spectrum, if so he's high-functioning. We're going to have him tested for developmental age next week. I might be PMing you, if its okay....



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by VoicingOut
reply to post by smyleegrl
 
That's true, but she can apply to do an iq test to see if he's able to learn fast or not, it all comes to ethics in the end though, but if the child has an above average iq, it'll be hard not to get bored fast in school, trust me on that




We had some tests done on him last year when he was 2 and he tested out at a 4-year old level so I'm sure his IQ is above average and that's exactly what we're worried about...him becoming bored.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


smyle check out dr. neubrander. he treats autism with methyl b-12. it has the pleasant side effect of also helping alleviate diabetic neuropathy and a host of other nerve related issues. i learned about him while searching for an alternative treatment for diabetic neuropathy, since the only thing the mainstream had to solve it, was pain meds.





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