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Meditation Without a Teacher

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posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 08:49 PM
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A post made on one of my sites, just saying incase anyone sees it elsewhere :



This is an attempt to give some advice for those that either don't have a teacher, don't want a teacher, or those who will maybe look for a teacher in the future but don't want one at the moment.

For this to work several things are needed. Patience and discipline are two of the most important. With meditation that doesn't have a teacher, extra emphasis needs to be placed on this. If you don't have patience, you won't carry on until you see the benefits. If you're not disciplined, you'll not meditate consistently enough.

Another important part, especially seeing as there's no teacher, is that the meditator has confidence in his/her ability to gain insight into the nature of the mind, and the nature of what we think of as reality. Without confidence, all of the positive aspects that are hoped to be gained will be tainted with doubt. Doubt is a hindrance, and there should be an awareness of this.

The meditator also needs the awareness to know whether or not s/he is progressing. This isn't easy and delusion can and probably will be an obstacle at several stages. Without the awareness to see this, which should be developed as meditation is done over time, the meditator will be lost. A teacher usually acts as the awareness of how the student is progressing or not, then directs the student towards understanding that so that s/he can continue progressing, or correct the errors that are stalling the progression. So without a teacher awareness is one of the keys. If the meditator can't develop enough awareness then maybe it's best to seek a teacher for guidance instead.

Skill is also needed. Skill here meaning the act of refining the ability to do the types of meditations that are chosen, and also finding the right types of meditation that are best. Also gaining the right insights from the meditations.

A set of qualities should be emerging as the meditator progresses. Some of these qualities are an increase in = awareness, concentration, unattachment, equanimity, egolessness, serenity, and metta (kindness). Others are what was mentioned above, like skill, patience, and discipline.


The root of the problem being aimed at, or the understanding of why the meditator has the goal of awakening is that most of us are in a way, asleep. We don't properly understand how what we think of as "reality" works, and how to live in it properly without being free from things like stress, delusion, anger and greed. We don't understand balance in the way we should, or what the Buddha would call "The Middle Way." The aim is to try and wake up and understand what these things mean, and in a sense, be those things. The balance, the middle way, the understanding, the realisation, and so on, as we live our lives. Free from delusion, anger, greed, stress, and all the variations of those negative aspects.

For those familiar with the concept of karma : maybe experiment with reducing karma from time to time, by not creating events or adding to certain events. Clearly if someone needs help with something that isn't causing others any problems, then try to help, but experiment with other situations. Karma is action, and the more actions we take part in the more we become attached to the world. To learn meditation properly it's often said that there has to be some type of withdrawal from the world, even if temporarily. So experiment with it in the right situations. Say for example you're going to do something because you're bored : try not doing it and see what happens. See how it makes you feel, think, perceive, and so on.

Remember that even reacting to something as small as a thought, feeling, or perception can be classed as an event. To react is to add to an event, to take an action, which is karma. The reaction could also be seen as creating a new event in response. It can be hard to describe, but so many things are linked together. Try just noticing what's happening instead. You could even say noticing is an event, but to think like this could go on infinitely! Remember that you're just trying to reduce karma, reduce action, by not creating or adding to some events, and then noticing the way you are as a result of that over time.

By doing this properly you could increase the chances of being unattached to your surroundings, habits, thoughts, feelings, perceptions, and other things, and become better at meditating. Equanimity helps with this. If you're not sure what that is, maybe try researching into it.

This whole process isn't supposed to be easy, especially not without a teacher. If it can be done though, or even if a meditator can progress and learn before eventually finding a teacher or the right school, it's worth trying.

Another thing is research. Research the types of meditation that are chosen. Research how they're done via several different sources, their history, and also the school or tradition they come from if possible, to get a better understanding of the meditations and their origins.

This obviously isn't a perfect description of how to meditate, but hopefully it can be of help to those without a teacher in some ways.




posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by robhines
 


I can't meditate for the life of me. I bookmarked your goodie and will give it a go.
I cannot absorb it now as I am cranking The Sex Pistols full blast.
I will get back to you once I give it a try.

S&F



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by robhines
 


All I did was read alot of books about meditating but it took a couple of years before things opened up. Now I just do a bit of meditating in the shower the only peaceful place in the house. I can get to that calm place within seconds.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by celticdog
 


The flow of water is natural

it helps the mind synchronize to a natural state of being

water can act as a mirror and amplifier of thoughts on a platonic level.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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Meditation is your true nature.
Meditation is about finding the silence (peace). Silence is ever present underneath the noise. Underneath the appearance of thought there is silence. Just as underneath the moving pictures on the tv there is a still screen.

The screen is what you are but it is overlooked because it cannot be seen, only the moving scene is seen. Without the still ever present screen (of awareness) there can be no pictures appearing.

When the still peaceful silence has been uncovered it is found to be the one constant in an ever changing world.

edit on 4-3-2013 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by Wildmanimal
reply to post by robhines
 


I can't meditate for the life of me. I bookmarked your goodie and will give it a go.
I cannot absorb it now as I am cranking The Sex Pistols full blast.
I will get back to you once I give it a try.

S&F


Here is a great video about a lady who says she is having trouble stilling the mind and she is given some advice which helps her:
youtu.be...



posted on Mar, 5 2013 @ 06:22 AM
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Originally posted by Itisnowagain

Originally posted by Wildmanimal
reply to post by robhines
 


I can't meditate for the life of me. I bookmarked your goodie and will give it a go.
I cannot absorb it now as I am cranking The Sex Pistols full blast.
I will get back to you once I give it a try.

S&F


Here is a great video about a lady who says she is having trouble stilling the mind and she is given some advice which helps her:
youtu.be...


About 1 hr after watching this video, I tried to think what she meant by 'bigger than the mind',
And I experienced a weird sensation like 'I am everything I see'
That was probably my most happiest moment in my life. Too bad, it's temporary only.

Thanks for sharing this!!



posted on Mar, 5 2013 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by dodol
 


'Bigger than mind' is the space in which the thoughts appear. If you look right now to where your next thought appears and just wait for the thought to appear you will find that it is just a space, an empty space but it is the space that is aware of the appearing things (thoughts and sensations).

Meditation is about finding your true self (know thyself).
Here is video which points to the true self and helps to explain a little about the experience of thought.
youtu.be...

edit on 5-3-2013 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Itisnowagain
reply to post by dodol
 


'Bigger than mind' is the space in which the thoughts appear. If you look right now to where your next thought appears and just wait for the thought to appear you will find that it is just a space, an empty space but it is the space that is aware of the appearing things (thoughts and sensations).

Meditation is about finding your true self (know thyself).
Here is video which points to the true self and helps to explain a little about the experience of thought.
youtu.be...

edit on 5-3-2013 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)


Thank you very much for your time explaining this to me

It makes more sense to me now
I never thought of this empty space before
Now I also realized that I saw it a couple of times when I entered my mind in meditation.
The feeling is like entering the white light in the middle of darkness before I see the mind object.
Is this darkness the empty space?
So this empty space is also part of awareness too?
Thanks again for another video!!!



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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I don't have anything too interesting to add... I just wanted to reply, to show my support for the OP, and to add my two cents. I've taught myself how to meditate, among other things... and I've found that, as with most things you learn on your own, a teacher can be very beneficial but isn't completely necessary. Going it on your own, does require much greater patience and determination, not to mention resilience, as you'll need to push through the inevitable frustration that comes along with the likely event of a setback in your study.



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 12:11 PM
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My earliest meditation experiences were at age 14, using Transcendental Meditation, but two years later I found the best book for self-guided meditation: it was Steps to Knowledge, and I've been practicing it for nearly two decades now. I love it!

It teaches very simple meditation techniques, and connects a person to their spiritual family and their deeper purpose in life. The PDF of Steps to Knowledge is free. For me, though, it's priceless.
edit on 6-3-2013 by newway because: forgot to mention book



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 03:49 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by dodol
 


I think you might like this little video.
youtu.be...



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally posted by Itisnowagain
reply to post by dodol
 


I think you might like this little video.
youtu.be...


Thank you very much!!!



posted on Mar, 9 2013 @ 12:32 AM
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reply to post by robhines
 


Some good info and tips here. I've been meaning to begin regular meditation for some time. I've done it on and off for almost a year, but never consistently. This has inspired me to begin again.

I admit it would be easier if I had someone to guide and remind me, but if I can't rely on myself...who can I rely on, right?



posted on Oct, 19 2013 @ 05:50 PM
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Just bumping this for those that don't have teachers and are trying to learn how to meditate. Don't take my advice as gospel, it's just some tips that I thought might help after trying to learn myself over the years, and I think they might help in some cases. Remember to use your intuition too, you can be your own guide at times.



posted on Oct, 20 2013 @ 02:54 AM
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Trial and error, patience, persistence, as well as creativity. It really depends on the type of meditation really.

Some meditation require much focus, like a point. Lets say, your nose is itchy, instead of trying to scratch it, just try to focus on where it itchy. It gives somewhat of general idea of focusing in meditation, and trying to ignore it also somewhat helps the focus. Posture can depend on how well your comfortable, or used to it.

Most often or not, they require just plain slow breathing, and recognizing body sensations, as well as awareness of going into different brain wave en-trainment. The key to those types of wave is to keep your mind awake, while letting your body go into a state of sleep, if you will. However, the trick is just staying awake for as long as you can.

Other variety or styles are actually physically active meditations, like the Breath of Fire where you inhale slowly, while exhaling with force(USE CAUTION with that meditation, there are Health Warnings, like high blood pressure). Qi qong or Tai chi are great for getting to feel more in tune to the body, and are generally safe.

The only meditation that should require much caution is the infamous Third Eye Meditation. I do understand the premise as it help with the focus, but let just say it come with a price. Short cuts can be dangerous, and Im also somewhat curious of the actual nature of it symbolism. However, it been quiet popular for the past decades, and you will see much Crap about it.

But the best meditation are the one that are about nothing, but at the same time, you gotta be a little spirit creative for those ones. The only focus is just doing nothing, and just being. Experience is the best tool for such a type or style.

Im unfamiliar with mantras. Personally, I`d like to see more guides on the different types of meditation and the effect on the body and mind. It doesn`t have to be complex, just more accuracy would be helpful.

Here an e-book, I found it informative, and it speaks of the `Water Breathing``. Gee, if only this crap got better advertised. Thanks New Agers!!!!
Kundaline Syndrome e-book

edit on 20-10-2013 by Specimen because: (no reason given)





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