SpaceX reports problems with Dragon capsule;

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posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 02:28 PM
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A thruster problem on the robotic Dragon space capsule launched by the private spaceflight company SpaceX on Friday (March 1) has engineers scrambling to identify the cause, forcing a delay in the spacecraft's arrival at the International Space Station by at least a day. SpaceX and NASA officials say the thruster glitch, which occurred after the Dragon spacecraft's launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket today, prevented the spacecraft from performing vital maneuvers to put it on course for the International Space Station. The spacecraft is hauling nearly a ton of cargo and support equipment to the space station for NASA.

www.space.com...

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket successfully sent an unmanned Dragon capsule into orbit Friday for a cargo run to the International Space Station, but the Dragon's thruster system is crippled. The glitch has already forced a delay in the cargo craft's space station rendezvous. The Falcon 9 made a problem-free ascent from its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 10:10 a.m. ET. But a half-hour after launch, SpaceX's billionaire founder, Elon Musk, said in a Twitter update that controllers encountered a glitch involving the capsule's thrusters. "Issue with Dragon thruster pods," Musk wrote. "System inhibiting three of four [pods] from initializing. About to command inhibit override."

cosmiclog.nbcnews.com...

sounds expensive, press conference soon,,

twitter.com...


UPDATE 3:28 p.m. Asked about a timeline for docking at the station, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said, “We’re definitely not going to rush it.” Musk said the SpaceX team thinks they have fixed the problem. “If that’s the case, it’s certainly going to be a huge relief,” he said. “It was a little frightening there,” Musk admitted. ISS chief Mike Suffredini said not to rule out a berthing opportunity at the International Space Station on Sunday if all looks good.
edit on 1-3-2013 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Uggh. Hopefully they DID find the problem and have a good solution.

It would be great if companies such as SpaceX, Orbital Sciences, and Blue Origin can become regular players in getting supplies -- and eventually crews -- to the space station, and maybe someday beyond. What we don't need is a major failure of one of these launches.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
Uggh. Hopefully they DID find the problem and have a good solution.

It would be great if companies such as SpaceX, Orbital Sciences, and Blue Origin can become regular players in getting supplies -- and eventually crews -- to the space station, and maybe someday beyond. What we don't need is a major failure of one of these launches.



Its looking good so far, problem (apparently) solved. We'll see.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:13 PM
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Damn, I really hope that Dragon capsule pulls through. Im curious though, if NASA is a civilian agency, Owned by tax payers. then wouldnt privatizing space adventures be a bad idea, and create more secrets. just a thought
I guess one would argue that the more companies that are trying these leaps and bounds is better than just a few trying. anyways Good Luck Space X



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
Uggh. Hopefully they DID find the problem and have a good solution.

It would be great if companies such as SpaceX, Orbital Sciences, and Blue Origin can become regular players in getting supplies -- and eventually crews -- to the space station, and maybe someday beyond. What we don't need is a major failure of one of these launches.



I get what your saying, but surely if things are to go wrong/teething problems then much better its on these unmanned craft and lessons can be learned now than loaded up and a full crew on board, how ever advanced we think we are we are still at the very start and problems/accidents are going to happen, but its all part of the learning curve, however expensive. I agree it would be great to get these companies involved and making space much more accessible for everyone, not just NASA and their Never A Straight Answer acronym. I personally think it will be from companies like these that we will get disclosure and footage of the unknown that hasnt been messed around with and photo shopped.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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reply to post by canucks555
 


This is not good news for at least 2 reasons, the first being the obvious as stated your post.
The second is, the dragon capsule is rumored to be the front runnerof choice for the proposed
Manned mission to Mars

Hopefully they get these problems undercontrol for current and future missions, i was gonna apply for the trip with much to contemplate, adding this to the mix doesnt make thinking about it any easier.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 04:38 PM
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Originally posted by RadicalRebel
...The second is, the dragon capsule is rumored to be the front runnerof choice for the proposed
Manned mission to Mars...


I never quite understood how the Dragon -- or even NASA's Orion -- could possibly go to Mars.

It seems to me that any Mars cruise vehicle would need to be much larger -- giving the astronauts some room to stretch and exercise. Such a Mars cruise vehicle would be assembled in orbit -- like a much smaller version of the space station.

I can see a Dragon capsule or and Orion capsule being part of the Mars cruise vehicle assembly (maybe to ferry the crew up to the cruise vehicle in Earth orbit and back to earth again once the mission is completed), but I can't see how JUST a dragon would be large enough to do that job.

I understand that the mission you posted being promoted by Dennis Tito is only a fly-by of Mars (that proposed mission will go to mars, but just whip around the planet once, then immediately return to Earth), but even that mission requires almost months to get there and 9 months to get back. That's a lot of time in a Dragon capsule -- even if it was modified to have slightly more room.

That's especially true of Tito's proposal, because those astronauts would never get out of the capsule to "stretch their legs" -- they would be in it for the entire 16+ month duration of the mission. Maybe with his planned crew of just two people, the Dragon could be configured to give them what they need, but I would like to see more information on what Tito and SpaceX envisions this Mars Dragon to look like.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


I agree with all the points you make, when i had originally concidered applying it was suggested to be a solo mission. Still not much more room though.
Will be interesting to see those mission plans evolve as the target date of 2018 approaches. I really want to learn more and to apply to see if i could go, its not actual going or the confined spaces, or the solitude that concerns me...its the getting back part.
Lets say 288 days in and im (or whoever) supposed to fire a thruster to guide the capsule into slingshot trajectory....what if it doesnt fire....


jra

posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
I never quite understood how the Dragon -- or even NASA's Orion -- could possibly go to Mars.


I think they'd have a module of some sort attached. From the articles I've seen, they show a capsule with an inflatable module attached to the front. Although that just might be some stock images taken from other proposals. But I think having some sort of added module would be necessary, not just for extra room, but also to carry food and other supplies, since it will be a long trip.

Man would I love to go, but I don't think my wife would be up for it


Also, it looks like the Dragon is "Back on Track [Discovery.com]".



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 10:22 AM
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nm.
edit on 3/2/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 10:29 AM
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SpaceX reports problems with Dragon capsule


If what I've read on the MSM is true (hack, cough) then these issues have now been resolved.

One thing I have wondered about is whether or not, or to what degree, those 'established' multi-corporate launch system hold the young start-ups like SpaceX, in enough contempt to, say... um, toss a wrench into the machinery?

As I recall, it was the one that Boeing is part of that was miffed that SpaceX landed that recent launch contract with NASA. Corporate espionage is an old story so... it can tweak the old conspiracy theory synapse into action.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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Just caught this up on yahoo,

SpaceX's Dragon Space Capsule Visible in Southern Night Sky

Only mentions the thruster malfunction but say that the capsule is still expected to dock with the space station no earlier than tommorow.

Also gives some links so people can find out if they will be able to spot the two objects passing by.
NASA link to satellite observations

According to the nasa link i can see them at about 7pm local time tonight(est), too bad i dont have a telescope
edit on 2-3-2013 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)


jra

posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 05:51 PM
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Originally posted by redoubt
As I recall, it was the one that Boeing is part of that was miffed that SpaceX landed that recent launch contract with NASA. Corporate espionage is an old story so... it can tweak the old conspiracy theory synapse into action.


The one you're thinking of would be United Launch Alliance (ULA). Which is a joint company between Lockheed and Boeing.

ULA rockets aren't as affordable and the company relies on large annual subsidies to stay afloat. So I can definitely see them being worried about loosing contracts to more affordable launch providers. Corporate espionage/sabotage is always a possibility, but it could just as easily be development issues with a new vehicle. Time will tell. I'm sure they'll do a thorough inspection when it returns.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 12:44 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by RadicalRebel
...The second is, the dragon capsule is rumored to be the front runnerof choice for the proposed
Manned mission to Mars...


I never quite understood how the Dragon -- or even NASA's Orion -- could possibly go to Mars.

It seems to me that any Mars cruise vehicle would need to be much larger -- giving the astronauts some room to stretch and exercise. Such a Mars cruise vehicle would be assembled in orbit -- like a much smaller version of the space station.


Could be used as an emergency return vehicle if it can travel the distance. I am assuming it can handle moon and mars much better than the Russians and NASA did back in the day. They say Apollo used calculator technology.
edit on 3/3/13 by SixX18 because: Messed up the quotes



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


The DragonRider interior seems spacious enough for 2-3 people.



en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by wildespace
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


The DragonRider interior seems spacious enough for 2-3 people.



en.wikipedia.org...


The Mars Mission proposed by Dennis Tito would be almost 18 months long (17 and one half months, technically) , and would be a continuous 18 months, without getting out of the capsule. His proposed mission is only a "fly-by" of Mars, with the spacecraft only being "at" Mars for only a few hours while it slingshots around the planet once, before immediately turning back toward Earth.

I would think a spacecraft that someone is to spent 18 months straight in would need to be bigger than a small room if we want that crew to stay both physically AND mentally healthy. I suppose they could try to cram the required personal hygiene facilities, exercise facilities, entertainment facilities, etc. into a capsule the size of a small room, but I wonder how adequate those facilities would be?

As someone else mentioned, maybe this dragon capsule would have an attached module for the food and supplies required for the crew for that year and a half spent in this capsule, but I'm more concerned about the living facilities for the crew.


EDIT TO UPDATE:
OK -- I now see this article about an inflatable habitation module that would potentially be added:
Dennis Tito's 2018 Human Mars Flyby Mission Explained

This seems to be more do-able, but still looks like a small amount of space in which two people would live for almost 18 months straight without ever getting out.

edit on 3/3/2013 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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Here is a little update from reuters for anyone interested,
SpaceX capsule reaches space station

Mission Acomplished i guess, but it leaves me thinking...


Dragon is the only station freighter that makes return trips, a critical service that was lost after the U.S. shuttle program ended in 2011. Cargo ships flown by Russia, Europe and Japan incinerate in the atmosphere after leaving the station


With the tremendouse costs of getting things into orbit, why not keep some of this stuff out there and use them to build some type of craft that can be added to later, similar to the space station itself, but outfitted with different types of thrusters/engines that can then be used to travel from here to...well, anywhere.

Theoretically we should already have a small city up there, why let these things burn up on re-entry, when we could already have platforms for low(er) cost launches, space "mining" even moon bases...so wasteful.
edit on 3-3-2013 by RadicalRebel because: (no reason given)





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