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What if Earth has changed gravity and caused the great flood in our past?

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posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:04 PM
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I'm sorry I hit the enter and the thread was born before I finished the title, so now some rushed thought only: There are those stories of the giants in the Bible, in greek myths and in many legends across the world, we have fossils of giant animals and plants, we have buildings from out acient past that are too heavy and too big to be made right now - what if before the great flood the gravity was lighter?
Is it possible?
edit on 28-2-2013 by jazzgul because: grammar




posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:26 PM
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This has been discussed from various angles before here on ATS.

Have a look here:
expanding earth



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:27 PM
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Little more explanation to the previous post:
I have read many old legends involving grand changes of the Earth, some of them from various places around the world are telling different version of what seems to be the same story: the sky fell down and there was the great flood and everything changed.
Just yesterday read this thread about possibility that Earth once didn't have moon.
Maybe all of it is connected?
Maybe Our Earth was once moon free with lighter gravitational pool, that allowed plants and animals (and who knows, maybe humans too/) to grow big, but than something happen in our solar system something which caused all those changes, including changes in Earth crust...
Maybe Earth got a moon, maybe changed orbit around the sun and maybe changed it gravity too...
just some fuel for thought....



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by kloejen
 

I'm familiar with Expand Earth theory but this is an suggestion about one in-a-life-time-of the Earth cosmic event, which happened and triggered various changes.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 


How do you propose that gravity would change?

Do you propose that it happened in "just a snap"?

And why would that cause a sudden event like the "great flood"?

Guess I don't see that as feasible.
edit on 2/28/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:51 PM
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Or maybe a massive body passed near to Earth in the past and the gravity from this other body "pooled up" Earth's seawater to the side facing the passing body. Thinking out loud...

Maybe this happened around the time we got our slow angular wobble... (precesion of the equinoxes)
edit on 28-2-2013 by Heliophant because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 

There has been no evidence discovered supporting a "great flood". And the geological history of Earth is a science that is very well documented. The planets current shore lines have been submerged and exposed many times throughout Earths history due to the many ice ages, but no global super flood.

Here is an article about the most likely source of the moon. How the Moon was made: A massive Collision

And dinosaurs and early mammals were so large due to the much higher levels of oxygen in the atmosphere at the time.
edit on 28-2-2013 by watchitburn because: Spelling



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 06:54 PM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


Aliens did it



Seriously thou:
There is theory that the asteroid belt was once actually a planet which was cradle of civilization type one or maybe even type two, the planet got destroyed, it caused Earth to change its orbit around the Sun, our globe went further away..
To correct Earth path, this powerful civilization brought moon to the Earth and manipulated its gravity so the moon might be place in perfect way...


edit on 28-2-2013 by jazzgul because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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This is highly speculative place for out of the box thought, the current moon theory has as much evidence as the story of an alien intervention, we simply don't know.

As for the growth of the body mass of animals and its connection to the oxygen level well, I think oxygen level was not an cause, but rather an effect of different quantity of giant plants...



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 


Well, every year, the Earth receives about 40.000 tonnes of space-dust. But remarkably, the Earth is losing about 50.000 tonnes of weight each year.
source

So we lose 10.000 tonnes each year. If we say that Homo Sapiens "arrived" about 200.000 years ago. The difference in weight would be 10.000 x 200.000 = 2.000.000.000 tons more weight, then.
But the Earth weighs about 6 x 10^24 kg, that's 6.000.000.000.000.000.000.000 tonnes.
It then turns out that the added weight in % is only a fraction: 0,0000000000003 %

So gravity was a tiny fraction greater back then. I don't think the math is going to help you here. But i sure would love to see them find one of the "giants". It would explain alot.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 


Gravity is a product of mass, so unless the Earth's mass changed then no, gravity did not change.

The reason creatures were bigger in the past is because there was more oxygen.

This is talking about insects but the same applies for all animals...


During the Carboniferous and Permian periods, atmospheric oxygen concentrations were significantly higher than they are today. Prehistoric insects breathed air that was 31-35% oxygen, as compared to just 21% oxygen in the air you're breathing as you read this. Atmospheric oxygen is the single most limiting factor on insect size.


insects.about.com...



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 08:18 PM
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As others have posted on here, gravity comes from the mass of an object. The greater the mass, the greater the gravitational force of that object.

In order to change the Earth's gravity, you have to add mass, and as it has been pointed out, the material the Earth does collect only adds mass in a very gradual way that would take much too long for your idea.

The only way for your idea to work, is if the mass is added very quickly, in large amounts. That would be large impactors with the Earth.

However, that would be a very bad thing. For example, the asteroid that hit the Earth 65 million years ago was only just under 7 miles wide, so it's mass was actually very insignificant when compared to the Earth's mass, in that, after it's impact, it would not have changed our gravity enough to be noticed.
But the effects of that impact certainly were since it wiped out 60 to 70% of life here.

In order to have much more mass, you'd have to have literally hundreds of that size asteroid hitting the Earth. And if the effects of just that one were so devestating, you can imagine what hundreds of them at a time would do.

Or, you'd have to a single very large impactor measuring in hundreds of miles, if not over a thousand miles wide.

However, if that were to happen, it would be very, very bad. Most of the Earth's crust would become molten from that type of impact. Absolutely nothing on the surface would survive or remain. Even if it happened today, the only thing remaining of us humans would be our satellites in space, the junk we left on the moon, and the probes in space. Everything else on the surface of our planet would be gone.

So there is no easy way to increase the Earth's mass and hence gravity quickly (in geological terms) without destroying everything that is here.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Still thinking outside the box...

You can create artificial gravity by use of centrifugal force
Is it possible to increase the gravity of the planet by adding that force to??



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 


The Earth already has centrifugal force because it spins, so again unless that changes, which I don't believe it has.

But if the centrifugal force becomes stronger than gravity from mass we would be thrown off the surface.
edit on 2/28/2013 by ANOK because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 08:41 PM
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reply to post by ANOK
 

I'm sorry I meant not adding but multiplying it

Edit to add to your edited post:


I believe If you are planet technician you can create right balance..
Imagine the task:
how to add a moon to the planet and keep this moon on steady orbit and not destroying the planet during the process
edit on 28-2-2013 by jazzgul because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Originally posted by jazzgul
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Still thinking outside the box...

You can create artificial gravity by use of centrifugal force
Is it possible to increase the gravity of the planet by adding that force to??




Actually, your first line "outside the box" should clue you in on Centrifugal Force.

Artificial gravity through centrifugal force only works if you're inside the object that is spinning.

The basic experiment, filling a bucket half way with water then spinning around with the bucket, you notice the water stays inside the bucket....because it's on the inside. Turn the bucket around and the water will go flying out.

If you've ever watched any movies showing a space station that spins for gravity, you'll get the idea. The movie 2001: A Space Odyssey gives a very good example of that. People are walking around the inner surface of the giant wheel that is spinning. If you were on the outside of the ring, it would want to fling you off.

If the earth were a hollow shell, then if it spins fast enough, you could get 1 G of gravity and walk around on the inner surface of the shell of the planet, but you would only have 1 G at the equator. The further north or south you go, it would get lighter and lighter.

But again, you'd have to be on the inside of the planet's crust, walking around on the inner side.

We do not get flung off our world by centrifugal force because one, the Earth isn't spinning that fast, and two, the gravity of our planet is more than enough to hold us to it.
Even if you could increase the Earth's spin, the amount of mass our planet has is more than enough to hold on to us and everything else on the surface.
The only thing you would achieve would be to make our day / night cycle shorter, make some very powerful winds, and tidal waves.

The only way to increase a planet's gravity is if you could increase it's mass.
edit on 28-2-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by jazzgul
 


It is my thought that there was no 'wobble' in the olden times, that only came about later and caused a lot of problems with a formerly balanced rotation.

The world would of had a much more prosperous and fertile climate in both hemispheres year round nearly.



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by Heliophant
Or maybe a massive body passed near to Earth in the past and the gravity from this other body "pooled up" Earth's seawater to the side facing the passing body. Thinking out loud...

Maybe this happened around the time we got our slow angular wobble... (precesion of the equinoxes)
edit on 28-2-2013 by Heliophant because: (no reason given)
You may be on to something with some "Body" passing close to earth.

This is a Google Earth snap shot of the area between South America and Antarctica. If depicted correctly, not only did a "body" pass by very closely, it was in contact for some time. I am suggesting that something spherical approximately 300 miles in diameter did just that. It appears to have left its track. My guess is this feature is between 70 and 80 million years old.




posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by All Seeing Eye
 


Afraid not.

Even at 300 miles wide, the impactor would not significantly change either the Earth's orbit, nor our axial tilt.

It can change our length of day though up to 5 minutes or so.

Also, an impact like that would be written in the geological record with a mass extinction 10 to 15 million years before the KT one....and there is no record of that.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:06 AM
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Originally posted by eriktheawful
reply to post by All Seeing Eye
 


Afraid not.

Even at 300 miles wide, the impactor would not significantly change either the Earth's orbit, nor our axial tilt.

It can change our length of day though up to 5 minutes or so.

Also, an impact like that would be written in the geological record with a mass extinction 10 to 15 million years before the KT one....and there is no record of that.
I dont see what ever it was to be a high speed impact. Quite the opposite, it looked very controlled. When I said 300 mile radius, I meant the actual contact area. The thing itself could have been 1500 miles or more in total diameter. Moon perhaps bouncing off Earth before it took up its present location? Any ones guess.





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