Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Remember when you were a kid "Food for thought"

page: 1
10

log in

join

posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:35 PM
link   
Hi Folks,

This might bring back a little nostalgia to some of you oldies out there... it certainly brings back happy memories to me!

This was sent to me quite a while ago but would like to share with you all :

According to today's regulators and bureaucrats, those of us who were kids in the 60's, 70's and early 80's probably shouldn't have survived, because our baby cots were covered with brightly coloured lead-based paint, which was promptly chewed and licked.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or latches on doors or cabinets and it was fine to play with pans.

When we rode our bikes, we wore no helmets, just flip flops and fluorescent 'spokey dokeys' on our wheels.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or airbags - riding in the passenger seat was a treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle and it tasted the same.

We ate chips, bread and butter pudding and drank fizzy pop with sugar in it, but we were never overweight because we were always outside playing.

We shared one drink with four friends, from one bottle or can and no one actually died from this.

We would spend hours building go-karts out of scraps and then went top speed down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into stinging nettles a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We would leave home in the morning and could play all day, as long as we were back before it got dark. No one was able to reach us and no one minded.

We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, and no Internet chat rooms. We had friends, we went outside and found them.

We played elastics and street rounders, and sometimes that ball really hurt.

We fell out of trees, got cut and broke bones but there were no lawsuits.

We had full on fistfights but no prosecution followed from other parents.

We played knock-and-run and were actually afraid of the owners catching us.

We walked to friend's homes.

We also, believe it or not, WALKED to school; we didn't rely on mummy or daddy to drive us to school, which was just round the corner.

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls.

We rode bikes in packs of 7 and wore our coats by only the hood.

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke a law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law.

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers and problem solvers and inventors, ever. The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all.

And you're one of them. Congratulations!

For those of you who aren't old enough, thought you might like to read about us.

This my friends, is surprisingly frightening ...and it might put a smile on your face:

The majority of students in universities today were born in 1983. They are called youth.

They have never heard of We are the World, We are the children, and the Uptown Girl they know is by Westlife not Billy Joel.

They have never heard of Rick Astley, Bananarama, Nena or Belinda Carlisle.

For them, there has always been only one Germany and one Vietnam.

AIDS has existed since they were born.

CD's have existed since they were born.

Michael Jackson has always been white.

To them John Travolta has always been round in shape and they can't imagine how this fat guy could be a god of dance.

They believe that Charlie's Angels and Mission Impossible are films from last year.

They can never imagine life before computers.

They'll never have pretended to be the A Team, Night Rider or the Famous Five.

They can't believe a black and white television ever existed and don't even know how to switch on a TV without a remote control.

And they will never understand how we could leave the house without a mobile phone.



Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 27-2-2013 by Rodinus because: (no reason given)
edit on 27-2-2013 by Rodinus because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:40 PM
link   
reply to post by Rodinus
 


Or as Tim would say..........



edit on 27-2-2013 by Taupin Desciple because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:41 PM
link   
The majority of university students are turning 30 this year?



Old chain mail is old.




But, some of it is still true.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:44 PM
link   
reply to post by DaTroof
 


Yep DaTroof, maybe chain but its nice to be reminded from time to time...

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:50 PM
link   
startin' fires ...

another thing we do.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:58 PM
link   
reply to post by Rodinus
 


Yeah, the early to mid '60s was a good time to be a kid. I feel bad for my own children that they'll never know those simple joys. Its hard to remember when there was no tech, nothing but that big old TV in a wooden cabinet. And we only watched that when it was too dark to go play outside. Seemed like there was so much more to do back then...



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:00 PM
link   
I was born in 1986.

I played outside until i was 18.

I did not have computer until i was 13.

I did not own a mobile phone until i was 21.

I climbed tree and fell. Only to come home crying for more beating by parents on why i should not do dangerous things.

I actually had floppy drives and disks.

I had SNES system, i know 2d graphics.

i remember when songs had meaning behind them.

!



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:26 PM
link   
Well I drank from the hose and it tasted like hose water.

Outdoor tap water tasted like tap water, and it was all considered garden water.

Stereo was only good with headphones, but wide stereo sounded strange on the tape deck.

Some of those things are from the 40's surely. Or despite having nothing but 1 black and white tv in the whole house, and only getting a landline phone when I was about 6, we had a lot more than others... even if all 3 tv stations stopped at midnight every night. somehow I think we had less, but from that list, some old people deserve to be grumpy lol


My school was an hours drive away. ha. walking that...

I think we glorify the past, but if you were to live there again, you'd miss today with tremendous angst.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by luciddream
I was born in 1986.

I played outside until i was 18.

I did not have computer until i was 13.

I did not own a mobile phone until i was 21.

I climbed tree and fell. Only to come home crying for more beating by parents on why i should not do dangerous things.

I actually had floppy drives and disks.

I had SNES system, i know 2d graphics.

i remember when songs had meaning behind them.

!



Pretty much the same here, but 1981 and my family got a PCjr. in 1984. I miss that thing. Had to boot DOS from a 5 1/2" floppy. Great memories.

I wish I didn't have a cellphone, but my job basically demands it. Remember when people used their doorbells or had secret knocks instead of texting "I'm here"?



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 03:03 PM
link   

We did not have Playstations or X-Boxes, no video games at all. No 99 channels on TV, no videotape movies, no surround sound, no mobile phones, no personal computers, and no Internet chat rooms. We had friends, we went outside and found them.


We did have the Atari 2600 though!


I still actually have one, with about 70 something games... I'll be hooking it up to the TV in the ManCave for fun, hehe.. (Eventually, I plan on building an arcade style cabinet, then putting in a flat screen TV as the screen, getting real arcade joysticks and button controls, and being able to switch between a few old consoles (housed in the body of the arcade cabinet. The outside will be painted with all kinds of iconic characters...Pac Man, Mario, etc.)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 05:16 PM
link   
Fun to reminisce for me anyways, raised in the 60's......

I remember mom saying to us get out of the house and see you at supper time, knowing full well one neighbour or another would feed us lunch with their kids.

I remember getting the ass whooped off of me by any parent on the street for my transgressions.
after the ass slapping my only fear was they would tell my parents because that would mean another ass slapping.

I remember whole streets would come out just to socialize and yap the night away.

I remember the infamous " DON'T TOUCH THAT DIAL (tuner) on the tv set as you might screw up all 3 channels we received.

I remember going to the beach with my brother and we were aged 6 and 8 at the time and we had no parent with us, no need everyone on the beach was a parent and watchful.

I remember eating Peanut butter with every soul in our neighbourhood and nobody had any reactions to eating it one of the most friendly and convenient insta lunches every known to Mothers world wide.

I remember going to the corner store to buy a pop/soda and they were in large coolers with ice cold water, you paid your 3 cents and stood out front and sucked it back, then you brought your MT bottle in and left it in a rack.
Not for the deposit on the bottle because every corner store trusted you to return the bottle and never charged the deposit fee which was an outrageous 2 cents.

I remember buying popsicles and they would split them for you and even open the top of the wrapper....


Later in life I remember keeping my lunches in my High School locker till lunch time and never dieing of food poisoning ......roast beef/egg salad/tuna/and yes peanut butter........all sitting growing life ending bacteria for more than 5 hours a day.

Very good post and S&F

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 12:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Iwinder
 


AYE LAD…

Them were the days !

Playing against a wall with just a simple stick and tennis ball…

Getting up every morning eating my bowl of porridge before walking the 8 miles to schools come rain or snow in the dark and walking home from school in the dark again…

Dreading the feared headmaster who thought nothing of throwing a chalk rubber at you in class if you even moved an inch… are coming behind you and giving you a good twist of the sideburns…

Pulling a quick drag on my first tab end (shared with 5 other classmates) behind smokers wall at the age of 12 and choking my lungs out…

Brushing my school uniform every night and polishing my shoes for the next day…

Getting my first electronic game “Simon” and playing for hours on end with it…

Sneaky peanut butter and cheese and onion crisp sandwiches…

Black Midget Gems… THAT TASTED OF BLACK MIDGET GEMS…

Ice popsicles that we left to melt and then ripped off a corner to suck the juice out…

Looking forward to every Saturday morning to spend at the swimming pool diving off the top board to look hard in front of my mates…

Listening to the like of The Jam, the Animals, Bill Haley, Matchbox… and pretending to be a Rockabilly rebel…

Having my first snog at the youth club…

Always being polite to my elders and never stepping out of line, with fear of getting a good scut around the back of the head…

Collecting pop bottles and going to the corner shop every Friday to get the money back to buy my 2000 AD comic…

Earning my first wage at 14 as a paper boy and saving up my money to buy my first pair of crepes… (Yea, teds were the fashion in those days!)… Along with those fluorescent Orange or Green socks…

Going to the Saturday morning matinee by myself for the first time to watch Flash Gordon…

Moving out of home to live in the real world as a young adult and feeling so great but at the same time so deeply sad to leave all those carefree times behind...

Jeez, I could go on for hours and hours…

But yep, Them were the days lad!

Kindest respects

Rodinus

edit on 28-2-2013 by Rodinus because: phrase added



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 09:10 AM
link   
It all began when a huge change took place: rule of children, by any and all forms, became the manifestation of emotions, instead of the historically-proven methodology that enabled human evolution. I call that old method "get the fluff up and walk it off".

Emotionally-driven decisions are rarely sound.

Is it time for the Age of Reason to come back around yet?



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 09:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by chasingbrahman
It all began when a huge change took place: rule of children, by any and all forms, became the manifestation of emotions, instead of the historically-proven methodology that enabled human evolution. I call that old method "get the fluff up and walk it off".

Emotionally-driven decisions are rarely sound.

Is it time for the Age of Reason to come back around yet?


It is time indeed for this to happen, but unfortunately i personally cannot see this happening!

The rule of children... i feel that all Western culture has been affected here!

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 03:01 PM
link   

Originally posted by Rodinus
reply to post by Iwinder
 


AYE LAD…

Them were the days !

Playing against a wall with just a simple stick and tennis ball…

Getting up every morning eating my bowl of porridge before walking the 8 miles to schools come rain or snow in the dark and walking home from school in the dark again…

Dreading the feared headmaster who thought nothing of throwing a chalk rubber at you in class if you even moved an inch… are coming behind you and giving you a good twist of the sideburns…

Pulling a quick drag on my first tab end (shared with 5 other classmates) behind smokers wall at the age of 12 and choking my lungs out…

Brushing my school uniform every night and polishing my shoes for the next day…

Getting my first electronic game “Simon” and playing for hours on end with it…

Sneaky peanut butter and cheese and onion crisp sandwiches…

Black Midget Gems… THAT TASTED OF BLACK MIDGET GEMS…

Ice popsicles that we left to melt and then ripped off a corner to suck the juice out…

Looking forward to every Saturday morning to spend at the swimming pool diving off the top board to look hard in front of my mates…

Listening to the like of The Jam, the Animals, Bill Haley, Matchbox… and pretending to be a Rockabilly rebel…

Having my first snog at the youth club…

Always being polite to my elders and never stepping out of line, with fear of getting a good scut around the back of the head…

Collecting pop bottles and going to the corner shop every Friday to get the money back to buy my 2000 AD comic…

Earning my first wage at 14 as a paper boy and saving up my money to buy my first pair of crepes… (Yea, teds were the fashion in those days!)… Along with those fluorescent Orange or Green socks…

Going to the Saturday morning matinee by myself for the first time to watch Flash Gordon…

Moving out of home to live in the real world as a young adult and feeling so great but at the same time so deeply sad to leave all those carefree times behind...

Jeez, I could go on for hours and hours…

But yep, Them were the days lad!

Kindest respects

Rodinus

edit on 28-2-2013 by Rodinus because: phrase added



Yes sir I could go on for hours and hours as well.........
I really feel bad for the children today knowing what they are missing out on.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 10:39 PM
link   
Stuff I tell my kids about:

When a phone had a rotor and was heavy enough to be used as a murder weapon on Cannon or the Rockford Files or Dallas. It had an actual bell inside it. We lived in an area so rural we had party lines (more than one house per number) and you only dialed the last 4 digits (!) of someone's number. The town operator was also the police and fire dispatcher.

We played sandlot baseball with the girls. The first time I got beat up was by a girl in a baseball game; and the first time I got kissed was walking home from a sandlot baseball game.

We were townies, but the country kids who lived out in the sticks and rode a bus to school, all had BB guns or air rifles or 22s; they also had dirtbikes or go-carts. You wanted to stay the night at a country kid's house because you wanted to use his dangerous toys. He wanted to stay the night at your house so you both could walk downtown for a malt and a comic book (which probably cost a dime) at the pharmacy, and then go play baseball or go swimming in the city pool.

My parents read magazines like US News and World Report, and National Geographic.

We thought playing in the sprinkler was the best thing in the world. We'd stick a garden hose turned low in the sandbox, and have army men fight battles.

all the boys on our street would get together with their GI Joes and have boot camp (Vietnam was winding down by that point). G.I. Joe at that time was 10 inches high or so. As the war went worse and worse for the USA, G.I. Joe got into spying and recovering stolen artifacts and whatnot. I had all the pieces for "The Secret of the Mummy's Tomb" and all the kit plus the 45 rpm record for "Journey to Spy Island"

We ran around with cap pistols, staging mock battles

We made our own corn-cob pipes, and smoked cornsilks in 'em.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 10:08 AM
link   
I remember getting the 10 inch Bionic Man and lab set for Christmas....I also remember my father playing with it for about 2 hours before I ever even got to touch it...



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 12:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Gazrok
 



Remember the Maskatron, the bionic mans enemy (the guy with a couple of face changes)? You could change his hands and add like a big claw and you could hide things in his chest.

I also remember my first skate board with rubber wheels and the same afternoon spent at the emergency room with a twisted ankle!

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Mar, 3 2013 @ 09:59 PM
link   
Trying to manifest us old farts, yeah? Well, you asked for it. (50's-60's brat)

Our house was heated by a wood stove in the kitchen, that my Mom also cooked on. In the winter, I always slept with a dog, and we kept each other warm.

We didn't have running water in our house until I was 10. I remember my Dad yelling at me: "______, stop flushing that [expletive] toilet!!" I was amazed with the new toilet. It was MUCH better than going to the outhouse in the dead of winter.

We ate stuff that we picked, like sour apples, currents, mulberries, apricots, huckleberries, and we didn't ever consider washing them.

I carried my lunch to school in a Lost in Space lunchbox, and it had a matching thermos, which my Mom filled with nuclear red Koolaide.

For a treat, we would go to an A&W drive-in, and girls on skates would take our order and bring our food, which was set on a tray that hooked over the car _

We would go to a mantinee show at the theater, and stay there for six hours, watching three shows. Nobody worried about us.

I had to be home by dark, and my backside would get tanned if I wasn't.

We made our own toys, and all of us owned toy guns. I had a Secret Sam briefcase -- a plastic case that held a toy spring-loaded gun that shot plastic bullets and a "torpedo", which could hold a written message. The gun had an attachable silencer, an attachable gunstock, and the case had a working camera that could take pictures via a button the protruded from the case when the camera was inside it.

The Drive-In Movie was the place to BE, and us kids snuck in and sat by a speaker that wasn't being used.

We were let out of school for one week annually for the opening of deer hunting season.

We were let out of school for one week annually for the potato harvest.

On Halloween, we left home at 6:00 p.m. and got back at midnight. Nobody was abducted, nobody was injured.

I had a Western Flyer bicycle, which I treasured above all else. It had a built-in radio, headlights and a horn. My father paid a week's salary for that bike and I wish I still had it. When we moved from one state to another, I gave it to my best friend, because he'd always liked it.

We fished and hunted and our families enjoyed the spoils. We made bows/arrows and took down small game and were encouraged to do so.

I was given a pellet gun when I was 7. My Dad warned me to not shoot birds. I shot a sparrow, and he made me clean it, cook it and eat it. It was a good lesson. I took and passed an NRA course when I was 12, and was allowed to get a deer license.

[/end blather]



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 12:10 PM
link   
reply to post by Rodinus
 

Human community is developing, non stopping and unstoppable.

just watch the direction where the Establish lead us to.





new topics

top topics



 
10

log in

join