Looking for examples of alien writing.

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posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by Grimpachi
 


Sure the specific tech used to communicate may employ zeros and one (i.e. binary code) to convey a message, but this is hardly writing in any meaningful way. Binary code does allow for a message to be communicated, but the actual interpretation of the binary code - what all the ones and zeros mean - is highly dependent upon the client receiving the transmission.

Without a key (such as an operating system pre-set to interpret such language form as communicated - for instance, a certain understanding of what a specific and precise sequence of binary code means) to interpret the binary code the client is unable to make any meaningful interpretation of the communication.

The result is total failure to establish a "protocol" for dialogue. Just like computers, unless the client knows what it should expect from a communication, it is useless. The binary code is simply a data representation of writing and symbols (such as MS-Vista source code). When received by a client PC the binary code (as transmitted by the initializer) gets re-interpreted by the PC operating system and its sub-routines (i.e. programs). Those programs recognize the ones and zeros and decode their meaning: look at what is received and you see programming language, NOT binary code.

So, simply put, without a key the use of binary code is useless, despite being efficient in transmission.

Just my two cents worth.
edit on 12-3-2013 by Blister because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 01:00 PM
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Originally posted by kudegras
You might try the Voynich manuscript, it was apparently written in the middle ages and scholars have never been able to decipher it. It is either a load of rubbish or some unknown language, I am not saying it is Alien but if it cant be deciphered from known languages then who knows where it is from.
Maybe it is not of this world.


The Voynich manuscript is commonly thought to be a (beautiful and inventive) load of rubbish, due to a lack of internal consistency in its ciphertext, according to various analyses. In other words, it was deciphered to the point where glaring inconsistencies appeared that normally mean a text is not a ciphertext at all, but simply manufactured.

It sure is pretty, though.



posted on Mar, 30 2013 @ 02:32 PM
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I like the so-called "Drone" writing from back in 2007.

www.dronehoax.com...



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Autograf
 


Sorry to necro post but I have to correct myself, new evidence shows Voynich MS may have 16th century Mexican origin. Many of the plants and minerals have been identified and are local to that area, and the script shares similarities to existing Nahuatl documents.



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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jimmiec
011100110100110001100111001010110

ummm

sLg+ ?? Lol.... methinks someone has been mashing their 1's and 0's randomly :-P
edit on 29-1-2014 by parad0x122 because: typos



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by Blister
 


Where did you receive this information that makes you believe that a particle acceleration research facility is supposedly hoarding super secret Alien manuscripts?



posted on Jan, 29 2014 @ 01:01 PM
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Blister
reply to post by Grimpachi
 


Sure the specific tech used to communicate may employ zeros and one (i.e. binary code) to convey a message, but this is hardly writing in any meaningful way. Binary code does allow for a message to be communicated, but the actual interpretation of the binary code - what all the ones and zeros mean - is highly dependent upon the client receiving the transmission.

Without a key (such as an operating system pre-set to interpret such language form as communicated - for instance, a certain understanding of what a specific and precise sequence of binary code means) to interpret the binary code the client is unable to make any meaningful interpretation of the communication.

The result is total failure to establish a "protocol" for dialogue. Just like computers, unless the client knows what it should expect from a communication, it is useless. The binary code is simply a data representation of writing and symbols (such as MS-Vista source code). When received by a client PC the binary code (as transmitted by the initializer) gets re-interpreted by the PC operating system and its sub-routines (i.e. programs). Those programs recognize the ones and zeros and decode their meaning: look at what is received and you see programming language, NOT binary code.

So, simply put, without a key the use of binary code is useless, despite being efficient in transmission.

Just my two cents worth.
edit on 12-3-2013 by Blister because: (no reason given)



I'm sorry to rain on your parade...but this is a pretty bad analogy. Binary = binary, no other way about it. It's a pure form of data communication. Now whether further decryption beyond the binary conversion to ascii (text) is required, THAT would be more-so along the lines of what you're trying to get across..





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