Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Amazing Quadrocopter Acrobatics!

page: 1
2

log in

join

posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 12:04 PM
link   

www.gizmag.com...


Apparently, balancing a pole on top of a flying quadrocopter robot wasn't challenging enough for the researchers at ETH Zurich's Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control. Their latest project has two quadrocopters playing catch with a precariously balanced pole – the first robot launches the pole into the air, while the second robot deftly moves into position in less than a second to catch it as it falls. The incredible precision flying achieved by the team can be seen in a video after the break.


The ability of "machines" is getting pretty crazy...science/tech is reaching really accelerating at an amazing speed!! I can only imagine what I will be able to see these machines do by the end of my life!!

As always technology is neutral...science is neutral and these machines can be used for either good or bad...THAT is up to humanity to decide though.

Makes me wonder what the military is really toying around with these days...

Skynet??
edit on 25-2-2013 by Sly1one because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-2-2013 by Sly1one because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-2-2013 by Sly1one because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 01:43 PM
link   
Tell me about it. We're further along than many realize.

I added a link to these quadrocopters on my youtube account about a year ago.

Here (circa ~2010):

I like this one (circa ~2009):

And what happened to Watson? The AI that competed on Jeopardy:
www.forbes.com -
IBM's Watson Gets Its First Piece Of Business In Healthcare...


.........
Pricing was not disclosed, but hospitals and health care networks who sign up will be able to buy or rent Watson’s advice from the cloud or their own server. Over the past two years, IBM’s researchers have shrunk Watson from the size of a master bedroom to a pizza-box-sized server that can fit in any data center. And they improved its processing speed by 240%. Now what was once was a fun computer-science experiment in natural language processing is becoming a real business for IBM and Wellpoint, which is the exclusive reseller of the technology for now. Initial customers include WestMed Practice Partners and the Maine Center for Cancer Medicine & Blood Disorders.
.........

Granted, Watson - or rather his descendants - will have to prove themselves. But my guess is that having a natural-language-like search and analyses engine in hospitals is good. Meanwhile, I desperately hope that its human users stay every bit as critical and knowledgeable in order to still be effective. One cannot just depend on computers to produce good output. Computers are tools.

If computers replace us, I'd be against that. But I don't think we'll be replaced. I think we'll adapt. We'll find ways to contribute. We'll be freed to do more ambitious things. If you look at machines, they freed us from simple grinding work. This allowed us to focus more on learning new things instead of doing the same simple things repeatedly. It also reduced costs and allowed more people to be fed and kept healthy. We further developed complex expert skills that could not be replicated by machines. Even if AI can do some of these things better, I doubt it'll be a game stopper. Humans will use all these advances to expand into the frontier. We'll use it to feed more people. It's not as bad as it appears. The average lifespan for a human has been going up, not down. In the 1800's a person was only expected to live into their 40's. Now we're living into our 70's. I expect this trend to continue until it reaches the limits of our biology. We'll probably branch out into synthetics.

The only way skynet could come into being and destroy humanity is if we give AI diverse self-awareness and the ability to create its own physical bodies at will. The problem is that this is easier said than done. It's not likely to happen. It's about as likely as humans destroying earth in thermonuclear war. Our natural defensive instincts will not let us destroy ourselves.

I think ti's far, far more likely that humans will start to invade computers. Maybe we'll upload parts of ourselves to preserve our private history. Maybe disabled people will partially live on virtual earths. Maybe kids will go to virtual multi-cultural schools. There're all sorts of possibilities. If we gain from using virtual environments then we'll use them. But all of this is just a way to make it easier to live in the physical world. I believe that computers are not an end, but a means to a better life. They're a means to expand our hold on the physical world. Without hte physical world, the internet and all virtual worlds would not exist. Thus, there's a selection pressure for the physical to always persevere over the virtual. But if the virtual compliments the physical then it'll co-exist with it.

Look at drugs. Most people would say they're not helpful. Yet why do they exist? Because humans have a natural urge to change their state of mind. Thus they're preserved. In this way, they compliment reality. The same may happen with some virtual worlds. Many virtual worlds have become a form of temporary escape for some people. As long as it's not extreme, it can be beneficial just like vacations are. I view this as very similar to the instinctive need for altered mind states that exists in some people. There's also the addiction element. Some addictions are genetic and some are communicative. This is less positive. Since I cannot see how nature would want to preserve addictions, it's hard to understand why they exist. But one only has to understand that evolution is not a perfect process and the survival of a species is not guaranteed. Over 99% of all species on earth are extinct. And similarly the estimated lifespan of a person is not guaranteed either.
edit on 25-2-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 02:13 PM
link   
In what way are these things programmed? do they sense one another, or is it based on them being in specific coordinates at specific times?



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 02:28 PM
link   
reply to post by ImaFungi
 

It's mentioned that learning algorithms are used, but I don't know to what extent.

I doubt very much that the acrobatics are completely dynamic. My bet is that it's a mixture of both preplanned maneuvers and dynamic real-time feedback and reallocation of decision procedures.

Thus, it's possible that a small gust of wind on either the pole or the quadrocoptors will not spoil their efforts. However, if one were to introduce a different kind of pole, it may not work.

EDIT:
Here's where it's stated in the OP's link that they used a learning algorithm:

........
"This project was very interesting because it combined various areas of current research and many complex questions had to be answered: How can the pole be launched off the quadrocopter? Where should it be caught and – more importantly – when? What happens at impact?" Brescianini told RoboHub. "The biggest challenge to get the system running was the catching part. We tried various catching maneuvers, but none of them worked until we introduced a learning algorithm, which adapts parameters of the catching trajectory to eliminate systematic errors."
.........
edit on 25-2-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 02:38 PM
link   
I just found this:

Here's a link to demonstrate this is not a 3d animation or a conjob:
www.popsci.com - Inside The Swarming Quadrotor Lab Of KMel Robotics...


Every summer, the most creative minds in advertising and communications gather in the French resort town of Cannes, on the Cote d’Azur, to celebrate their own brilliance at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. These are the forward-thinkers, the industry’s most prominent problem-solvers, the crisply styled “creative types” who spotted the next big thing was before it was the next big thing, and then made it so. So perhaps it’s fitting that it was there, amid lavish parties and award ceremonies held for the world’s elite trend-spotters and trend-setters, that Alex Kushleyev and Daniel Mellinger, two 27-year-old roboticists living in Philadelphia, briefly grabbed the spotlight.

Kushleyev and Mellinger weren’t in Cannes to swap business cards or brand strategy over flutes of grand cru. The duo have little interest in selling cell phones or mid-luxury sedans, or anything else for that matter. In fact, that’s what makes KMel Robotics, their young startup, so unique: though they are a leader in their field, they aren't trying to sell their technology. Kushleyev and Mellinger specialize in quadrotors, those small, four-propellor hovering aircraft that can carry small payloads and, in the right setup, work together to perform complex tasks. KMel is working far enough ahead of the curve in this space that even Kushleyev and Mellinger have no idea what the killer application for their technology is--and they’re fine with that.
.........
edit on 25-2-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 03:02 PM
link   
Have a look at this, it shares some resemblance (ok, in a distant sort of way):
edit on 25-2-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 04:12 PM
link   
reply to post by jonnywhite
 


THAT is probably one of the crazies videos I've seen in regards to what these things are capable of...

They even SOUND kinda ominous...like a swarm of bee's on the hunt with intelligence and confidence.

Awesome video!



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 04:19 PM
link   
reply to post by jonnywhite
 




wow...I didn't know this was what they were capable of these days...its real...its happening...it IS the future...there is NO getting around it as these techs will only continue to get more and more refined.

I have been out of the robotics tech loop for far too long it seems...I didn't know that it had came this far since they were first trying to tackle bi-pedal mechanics...

AI seems to be the last hurdle in truly comprehensive robotic humanoids...



posted on Feb, 25 2013 @ 05:31 PM
link   
reply to post by Sly1one
 

I find it funny that I am both a science fiction fan and also constantly amazed at continuing developments in the technology fields. With warp drive in Star Trek and time travel in Quantum Leap and every imaginable technology out there in science fiction, WHY am I amazed by our puny (by comparison) developments? BECAUSE THEY'RE REAL. That's why! And often I don't expect it. I will sometimes bump into new things that I did not know existed.

Here's another youtube link (read below for an article about it):

Here's an accompanying article that covers what you're seeing inside the youtube video:
spectrum.ieee.org -
Stunning Video of PETMAN Humanoid Robot From Boston Dynamics...
edit on 25-2-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)






top topics



 
2

log in

join