La Roche aux Fees: The Rock of The Fairies, in Brittany.

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posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by Latexpriest
 


Obviously it's not my thread to give permission on, but it's sure on topic as the OP talks about it. It seems reasonable to me

I for one would be interested to see a couple of pics and hear some info on it having read many stories that take place there.
Or if you prefer, you could wait untill you have 20 posts and even start your own thread on it - i'd enjoy reading it i'm sure





posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:54 AM
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Hi Peeps,

I live not far from that area too and have visited Carnac quite a few times... a definate do

See video below which also provides a couple more views :



And how about a decent bit of music with video depicting the area too :



Enjoy

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:56 AM
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i shall wait until i have 20 posts then, and maybe then i'll do that, though i have other interesting subjects in mind for now and will leave the magic forest for later.

btw please excuse my english, i bet it sounds weird sometimes.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by Latexpriest
i shall wait until i have 20 posts then, and maybe then i'll do that, though i have other interesting subjects in mind for now and will leave the magic forest for later.

btw please excuse my english, i bet it sounds weird sometimes.



Looking forward to reading and seeing your posts Latex... and... your English is good so don't worry too much



Bonne soirée

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Rodinus,

Thank you for the incredible videos. I was totally not expecting that and it has really helped make the thread. God, that place is beautiful. I was fortunate enough to have grown up near a forest, it's now an 'equestrian trail, but when I found it as a child it was virtually untouched, at least for many years, and it was in a way, a paler but similar shade to what I see in the video.

Is that 'Merlin's Tomb', that the second video starts with?

Thank you again.




posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Latexpriest
 


Hello Latexpreist,

Fell free to post your heart out in my threads, you can get to them through my profile. I know that we are all dying to see your photos.

If you need any help at all getting set up to do a thread, just ask. I think that you could make a wonderful thread, just on Broceliande.

Thanks for coming by to post, and welcome to ATS.



P.S. Hey! Hold on a minute!...



hi all, if anyone needs some Pics from Broceliande i've made some cool ones, it's only an hour away from home, been there last summer..


No one has been able to find Broceliande, at least since Wace in the 12th century. How did you find it, and would you be willing to tell us where it is?

Thanks in advance.

edit on 26-2-2013 by Bybyots because: You went there last summer!



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 



Hi ByBybots,

It is indeed Merlins tomb, here is another video... the images say everything :



Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:41 AM
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This is really cool! My wifes granma lives there in a small castle like house and we are going to go visit in the summer, now I am more interested that I know some of the hisory and mysteries of the area.

Thanks for the information, i'm also a proud Celt (Scot) and things like this are just in our blood and now I can't wait to go there.

S+F, great job



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 


The forest that everyone calls Broceliande is actually called the forest of Paimpont and can be found here :

foret-broceliande.fr...

Once on the site click on the blue box to the right where it says Carte de la fôret de Broceliande then you can zoom in and out.

EDIT : Or even better copy paste this : fôret de paimpont into Google Earth

Kindest respects

Rodinus

edit on 26-2-2013 by Rodinus because: phrase added



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Thank you again Rodinus,

It am deeply touched to find so many others who feel the pull that these stones and locations have on our hearts and minds.

I am convinced that, for many of us, Broceliande and Camelot exist inside of our hearts, and it is occasions such as this thread that maybe allows us to all go there together for a moment, or a while, to get recharged from some mysterious and undying spring that can only be found there. Maybe it renews our faith a little, in the possible restoration of Excalibur, and the return of Arthur.

Thank you, Sir Knight.




posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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Amongst treasures to be found in the forest are the following : I had to do a little translation so apologies if some phrases sound strange

The Golden tree :

The Golden Tree, a True Message of Love between Myth and Reality

What sad legend might be behind this majestic golden tree? Was it an evil spell, the symbol of a quest, a just a magic chestnut tree? The golden tree is actually a token of true solidarity.

In 1990, the Valley-of-No-Return burned for 5 days. After the fire, thousands of donations poured in from all over the world to save the Valley’s mythical heritage. In 1991, to pay tribute to this international cooperation, a Parisian sculptor, François Davin, created “The Gold of Broceliande”, an enormous golden chestnut tree, with pure gold leaves. It symbolizes the immortality of the dreams of men of goodwill. Its branches evoke the antlers of stags, the wild animals who led the knights through the enchanted forests. Myths aside, the golden tree is there to remind us of the power of man’s love over Mother Nature.

The Barenton Spring :

Cut into the ground only a few feet deep, this little basin 6½ feet wide has the peculiarity of releasing nitrogen bubbles from its waters.

This phenomenon common in marshes gave the spring the name “Bubbling ice-cold water fountain”. According to Arthurian legend, it was in this setting that inspired such sweet melancholy that Merlin met the fairy Vivian and fell madly in love with her.

Later on, this strange source that could cause storms to break was kept by a fantastic black knight. According to some medieval local myths, the guardian was no less than an ogre with a bull’s head, elephant ears, the eyes of an owl, the mouth of a wolf, and the teeth of a wild boar…Enough to knock the wind out of you!

In 1467, the “Charter for the Uses and Customs of the Broceliande Forest” stated that Guy de Laval, Lord of Comper and owner of the spring, was the only one authorized to set off storms.
Processions to Barenton to ask the clouds for this particular favor multiplied up until 1954, and were supposedly always rewarded with a darkened sky that generously released downpours.

The Spring of Youth :

The Spring of Youth seems pretty modest in size compared to the Barenton Spring. It might even seem insignificant if it weren’t so bewitching.

Indeed, this little spring just above the ground has a much greater faculty than the ability to make it rain. Its water has the amazing power to give youth back to anyone who drinks it. Many legends born from the Quest for the Holy Grail credited certain waters with this ability to give eternal life. In fact, the first mention of such a power appears in the Bible.

This fountain is originally found in the Garden of Eden where it allowed bodies to preserve their youth and beauty. In the Arthurian legend, this source allowed wizards to live for centuries without having to suffer the mark of time.

Eventually forgotten, it was Sir Lancelot who kept this treasure for a while, thereby preserving his strength and robustness for the final battle at his King’s side. At the time of the druids, oddly enough, this trickle of water was used for baptisms and to take a census of the children born in the year. When a child was left out, he or she was counted the following year…and made one year younger in the process.

Merlin’s Tomb, the Soul of Broceliande :

Just like those who set out on the sacred quest for the Grail chalice, you can set out to search and discover Merlin’s tomb in Broceliande.

According to ancient tales, Merlin’s disturbing powers came from his own father who, it was said, was none other than the Devil himself. At once sorcerer, seer and prophet, he was therefore neither a man nor a god. He could see what simple mortals could not, could disappear and take on thousands of different appearances. As a druid friend and advisor, he guided the young King Arthur who unified the kingdom by instituting the order of the Knights of the Round Table.

The dolmen that provided shelter for the famous magician is no longer as imposing as it once was. There are only a couple of standing stones left in this mythical place where, according to legend, the famous Merlin was imprisoned forever by the enchantress Vivian. While these modest remnants might be a disappointment to older enthusiasts, they are sure to please children. Every year, thousands of flowers, bracelets and poems cover the mysterious grave.

And last but not least : The Holy Grail: The Ultimate Quest, for the Knights of the Round Table

It was Merlin who advised the young King Arthur to recover the Grail, that sacred and hidden object credited with such magical properties as the power to grant immortality, but also the power to bring peace and harmony between people.

According to the legend, the Grail was the chalice from which the Christ drank during the Last Supper with the apostles, as well as the vessel that collected his blood during the crucifixion.

The King put up a circular table around which the most courageous knights of his kingdom gathered. It was round so that all were equals facing the King, with no other distinction than their individual accomplishments. Only the purest among them could find the Grail and place it in the center of the table.

The church at Trehorenteuc, deeply nested in the forest of Broceliande, is probably the place that most vividly recaptures the past Quest for the Holy Grail.

A spiritual yet also cryptic message was left above the southern porch: “The door is inwards”. Did this refer to the Church, or one’s own faith as the source of the answers? This haven of peace unifies representations of Christian faith, Celtic traditions, and Arthurian legends into one art form. This church is one of the tiniest you’ll find in Morbihan, and while it may serve as a small museum for the Round Table epic, it remains above all a center for meditation and daydreaming

Enjoy

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 26-2-2013 by Rodinus because: phrase added



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 

Very Nice and informative post! S&F.

Like you, I live in Brittany (in your map, I'm in "Quimperlé") and love this place for many years now (I'm a native Brittany man BTW)

I have also an extraordinary story to share (It deserves its own thread that I'll prepare one day for sure) that involves two old ladies that have had a close encounter of the third kind in the Broceliande forest (this event occurred exactly in the little town "St Malo de Beignon".

Anyway, nice thread again!



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by elevenaugust
reply to post by Bybyots
 

Very Nice and informative post! S&F.

Like you, I live in Brittany (in your map, I'm in "Quimperlé") and love this place for many years now (I'm a native Brittany man BTW)

I have also an extraordinary story to share (It deserves its own thread that I'll prepare one day for sure) that involves two old ladies that have had a close encounter of the third kind in the Broceliande forest (this event occurred exactly in the little town "St Malo de Beignon".

Anyway, nice thread again!


Bouncing up and down in my chair like a kid before Christmas now...

Looking so forward to seeing your post.

Quimperlé is a great place too i visted a couple of years ago when i was in the Finistère region of Brittany (i remember the ruins of the St Colomban very well and stuffing myself with Crèpes (French pancakes (speciality of Brittany for those who don't know the word)).

Anyway, talking of food, i need to cook for wife and starving pack of siblings now.

Have a great evening to all.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by Bybyots
 


great thread thanks



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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As someone who thought he knew his Arthurian legends, sites and connections pretty darn well, i'm kind of ashamed that i had just assumed that The Forest of Broceliande was a mythical/fabled otherworld that adventures took place in and had never so much as checked it out! If it hadnt been mentioned earlier i would never have known


reply to post by Rodinus
 


Thanks for sharing, that was a great post and some very interesting legends.
The Tale of the fire and 'Gold of Broceliande' struck me too, and for me tree-porn is possibly even greater than rock porn, so i had to have a look for a picture...

It's beautiful, and fabulous to think that over time more plants and and trees will grow back to hide it amongst the woods, making it all the more mysterious as the years go by. what an awesome piece art.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:56 PM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


any chance at all the spring of youth truly restores youth?
edit on 26-2-2013 by reject because: spelling



isn't it almost a certainty the myth of king Arthur is based on a roman officer?
edit on 26-2-2013 by reject because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by reject
 



Hi Reject,

There are numerous stories, myths, legends or whatever one might like to call them concerning King Arthur but maybe this link might enlighten those who are interested :

King Arthur, who was he? was King Arthur a real person or a folk tale? Depending on the source he might be a late Roman, a Celt; a king, a general, or a guerilla warrior fighting the Saxons, the Romans, or even the Picts in the north of England.

www.legendofkingarthur.co.uk...



Happy reading

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 27-2-2013 by Rodinus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 02:09 AM
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right, i forgot those pics of mine, i'll share tomorrow.

speaking of the golden tree. actually that was a big deception. knowing the story, this beautiful piece of art has nothing to do with the all broceliande stuff ; and when in front of it, all you can feel is the fantastic surrounding.for instance, 50m away, you can actually see the "mirroir aux fées" , a small lake protected from wind so it looks completely still like a mirror. i have some pics of it as well as videos of me and my girlfriend getting lost for hours in the forest, and we forgot to bring water, like stupid, all we had were a beer and a magic cigarette.

seriously, when you leave the usual path for tourists, and wander around, that's when you can really feel the magic.

EDIT: found the broceliande folder... i'll share in a moment
edit on 27-2-2013 by Latexpriest because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 03:12 AM
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here the youtube channel with a few videos. poor quality i'll give you that. but you will definitely like the pictures later on.


www.youtube.com...



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 03:19 AM
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reply to post by Latexpriest
 



Thanks for sharing your videos Latex, i am going to bookmark so that i can have a good look through them all this evening.

Kindest respects

Rodinus





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