It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Calling all kitty experts!

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:28 PM
link   
My first thread, so please be nice :-)

I bought my kids 2 Persian kittens last Sunday ( went to buy one, but child #1 and child #2 each fell in love with a different kitten and I didn't have the heart to break either of their hearts).

The kittens hide 99% of te time. The tortie will come out occasionally and will let herself be petted, but quickly darts under the nearest bed or piece of furniture if she gets spooked. The black and white kitten never ventures out from under furniture, and runs like the devil is on her heels from one hiding place to the next. My hubby caught her on the fly today and she drew blood in 3 places!

How long will it take for them to chill out and be social?

It's been -13 years since we got our last kitty, and that was still when breeders let them go at 6 weeks. Now that they keep them until they are 4 months old, it's like you are bringing home a cat and not a kitten. I'm quite shocked by this behavior and have told the kids that they will warm up to them, but I'm afraid it won't happen...

(And before anyone thinks the kids are little ad scaring them, they are good kids. One is a teenager and the other is a preteen, both old enough to be calm and loving to kitties)

Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!
edit on 23-2-2013 by rimjaja because: Premature post

edit on 23-2-2013 by rimjaja because: Typo




posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:30 PM
link   


Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!


Get a dog.


Peace
edit on 23-2-2013 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:36 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:38 PM
link   
Because they can, that's why.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:50 PM
link   
I think 2 or 3 weeks by then they should be comfortable enough with their new surroundings. Once they explore the whole house and figure out that it`s their house they`ll let you stay there with them and even pet them.

edit on 23-2-2013 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:53 PM
link   
don't touch.

lay on the floor next to where they are hiding, so that they can make eye contact.
talk to them,
but don't touch.

they are scared.

teach them you are trustworthy, by not touching, or chasing.

they will come around, be patient.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:54 PM
link   
It's THEIR new house.... You have to give them time to adjust and run around, your kids may not be a problem but your kittens want to be able to take control and get to know their new territory.... If there's a lot of people walking around in your house they may not feel comfortable enough to go out and explore....



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:56 PM
link   
My cat was like this when I first got her, now she follows me everywhere I go. I believe that you need to build trust with your cat. They aren't looking for a pack, but they are curious creatures, kind of like we are in a way. Right now they see you and your family as giants and they aren't sure if they should trust you or not. Sit in a room with one of them, let it see you, sit on the floor facing away from it, so it doesn't feel like you are watching it. Be comfortable, breath and relax, if it comes up to you, don't pet it, just let it check you out. It's intimidated and just needs to know if it can trust you. When you look at your cat, close your eyes, it's another sign of trust. Open them and then close them again. Build trust with your cats and then if they feel like they are in a safe environment, you can pet them and start to treat them as members of the family. At least it worked for me, I hope it does for you as well.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by bjax9er
don't touch.

lay on the floor next to where they are hiding, so that they can make eye contact.
talk to them,
but don't touch.

they are scared.

teach them you are trustworthy, by not touching, or chasing.

they will come around, be patient.


This is what I did with my rescued deaf persian who was 6 months old at the time. She was terrified of everyone and every thing. She hissed and growled like a wildcat. Be patient. My kitty turned out to be the most loving and affectionate cat.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:04 PM
link   
Forgot to say I couldn't talk to my cat because she was deaf, but I would flick a light when entering the room or leaving. I would then lie beside her without touching. Leave a couple of treats near him/her. After some time she started purring and let me touch her.

Once they gain your trust it is imperative that you establish a grooming routine because these cats can get matted up fast.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:09 PM
link   
Cats like routine and structure, once they figure out what is going on around them they will come out if it is predictable enough. They also like laser pointers and we recently bought a water bowl for our kittens that uses a pump and a tank to move the water - this calms the cats down.

I can get the cats to move towards me by tapping on the floor with my open hand while kneeling, and cats are very good at communicating with body language, both yours and theirs. If you watch their body language, they will communicate what they want quite clearly. Also, if you want to train them, use routines that happen around the same time each day, or something with structure.

They are also quite intelligent and I don't think they like being talked down to much.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:14 PM
link   
I agree with Tardacus. Until then, you might want to feed them a little yummy soft food in a can - the good kind from the pet store. But you'd want to hold it out for them so they see the hand that feeds them or even put some on your fingers and let them lick it off. If they're liking either one of those things, you can gently stroke them with a finger while they eat. Have you tried catnip? Not too much though especially for young cats. In some way I recently read it can be harmful.

Play with them - interact with them. Strings with things work the best. Let them get to know you and trust you through play. Kittens and puppies are all about play. But they're afraid - that's why they're hiding and that's natural - to a point. Talk to them. When you walk in the room acknowledge them with a kind, high-pitched voice saying their name. No, of course, they won't know what your saying - it's your tone - and your willingness to reach out to them. Roll cellophane into little balls and flick them on the carpet. Pingpong balls are great even if you don't have hardwood floors - there's always the kitchen. Cat toys are cheap - and a great investment for happy cats.

Have everyone in the household wear some old t-shirts to bed a couple nights in a row and put them all in a box to play/sleep in so they can associate your smell with warmth and security. Also, allow them to see you ignore them sometimes so they know they can relax and aren't always 'bothered'.

Get a good sturdy cat scratch stand and put it in a central place. I bought a cone one and it falls over so my cat avoids it. A good one is just twine around a pole on a square stand with a toy hanging out the top.

Also you didn't mention if the kittens were siblings. If not, they may be reacting to each other. Generally silblings will play with each other and stick together. Give it time. If it doesn't change, there's always the cat whisperers and sites to refer to.

Let them see you take their water bowl every morning and clean it and put fresh water in it.

Cat scratch fever is a real thing! Keep some antibiotic ointment on hand. And if they actually break the skin, know that cat bites can be very serious and land you in the ER.

Not all cats are affectionate and interactive but they each have their own personality and will show you love in their own way. Good luck!



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:17 PM
link   
Getting a pet mouse and letting it run around in the living room will do wonders for your cat's social life.

Quite entertaining to watch them play with it also.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:17 PM
link   
We learned a while ago that female cats often do not like to be around one another. Typically in our house, we have a male and a female. They get along great like that... But occasionally, we have our old cat come to stay with us for a week or two, and with two females in the house, it can get outright violent. They both try to assert their dominance.

If both cats are of the dominant type, they may never chill out.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:48 PM
link   
Give them time to get use to their new home.
They will come out when they are good and ready.

Just like the one I had years ago that decided to attack my ankles one day.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:11 PM
link   
Twelve years ago we adopted some feral cats that acted just like that. Now they come out when you put the food down, but you still can't pick one up and pet it.

At least with dogs you can spit in their food and bond with them. (They realize you are the alpha when they taste your saliva in their food.) It works.
edit on 2-23-2013 by groingrinder because: Edited for genuine cajun flavor.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:18 PM
link   
Get some cat nip and put it everywhere in the house, they will love it and love you for it

(I know drug talk is not allowed but cat drug use must be OK?)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:25 PM
link   
reply to post by rimjaja
 



I picked up my cat on a farm. The kittens were all feral, and the one I picked was also a little tortie. This little critter hissed at me for a long time after I took it home, and would hide under my bedside table whenever I entered the room. I honestly don't remember how long it took, but one night I awoke to her on my chest licking my nose to get me to feed her. Since then she sleeps next to me every night.

What I'm saying is that cats, being the intelligent creatures they are, are naturally wary of new situations, like your children would probably be if they were suddenly adopted by a new family.

The cat I adopted is now 13 years old, a super cuddler and very talkative. She is friendly with everyone. They will warm up. Just keep the scary situations like loud noises and crowds to a minimum. Be the food provider and shelter giver, and eventually you will become one of their family members. I kept my cat in just my room for the first few weeks until she started feeling comfortable, then I let her out to roam around our whole house.

Try some of these methods in the links here:

www.wikihow.com...

www.dumpstercats.org...

WHATEVER you do, don't give up on these little guys!! It's truly sad how many kittens wind up at shelters or being put down because there is a misconception that timid cats can't overcome their fears.

Also try watching "My Cat From Hell" on National Geographic. They give great tips on understanding the psychological difference between cats and dogs. Trust me, they are different, but no pet is better than another. If you love them, and you both have a mutual relationship, then there is nothing but positive experiences to be had.

Cats ARE intelligent, and loving. People who disagree have probably had bad cat experiences. I fear for the individuals who justify violence towards animals simply because they "don't like them". Nothing but bad vibes and cruel people behind those eyes.

Hatred and harm to the defenseless is the ultimate evil, so watch out for those people out there too!! You're the protector of these kittens now :3

Namaste.:.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:35 PM
link   
We have two cats (brother and sister) that we bought home at exactly the same time and treated them both in exactly the same way.

One of them turned into a huge, fat, sociable, loves people and has to be the centre of attention all the time cat and the other turned into a nervous, will scratch your face off if you look at her in the wrong way, hiding under the sofa type cat.

Cats do their own thing, just be normal around them and they will develop into their own cat.

Cats are people too.



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 12:05 AM
link   
We got 2 sister kittens and they never enjoyed being held because we watched them play with each other instead of playing with them.. With our next kitten we held him often even though he was uncomfortable with it, They usually like getting stroked on their chin, the top of the head and behind the whiskers. Before long he started jumping on our lap and always comes when we call him.

Encourage socialization by making or buying interactive toys (drag/wiggle a stuffed toy or empty thread spool on a length of yarn), light bug (laser pointer). Use your imagination. They love movement. Show your kids how to coax them into playing. One piece of yarn or ribbon is all it takes.

If they don't get use to being held while they are young they may not ever like it.

Good luck.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join