Russian Fireball Largest Ever Detected

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posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:19 AM
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couple of days ago I was reading this article about that they can measure on different locations at stations around the world that impact is coming so did CTBTO’s Infra sound Sensors.

They pick up atomic blasts around the world and then they can pinpoint were it's coming from. Nothing new I would think. But in their story about this meteor strike that crashed earth, Its almost like they knew this was going to happen :



“We saw straight away that the event would be huge, in the same order as the Sulawesi event from 2009.


Or do I not read this correct?


nfrasonic waves from the meteor that broke up over Russia’s Ural mountains last week were the largest ever recorded by the CTBTO’s International Monitoring System. Infrasound is low frequency sound with a range of less than 10 Hz. The blast was detected by 17 infrasound stations in the CTBTO’s network, which tracks atomic blasts across the planet. The furthest station to record the sub-audible sound was 15,000km away in Antarctica.


Well I don't know but if they know what's going to hit us why not sound of an alarm..

CTBTO

Peace




posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 

If I'm not mistaken I think they're talking of measurements taken after the fact, or of the explosion itself. As far as I've read nobody (except the aliens with that meteor-killing gun) knew about this one before if streaked in front of the cameras.

edit on 23-2-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 09:53 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 





We know it’s not a fixed explosion because we can see the change in direction as the meteorite moves towards the earth


What does this say then?



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


It means that it was still travelling when it hit the atmosphere rather than a detonation at a fixed position on the Earth.. and the entry angle changes as it meets resistance.

Does it not?
edit on 23-2-2013 by Threegirls because: to clarify



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by Threegirls
 


Why can they see the change in direction ? then they do have some equipment that tracks it right?



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 

The direction from which the sound was coming changed because the meteor was moving.
As you watch an ambulance drive past, the direction of the sound changes.




then they do have some equipment that tracks it right?
Yes. That is what the article is about.
edit on 2/23/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 11:17 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


But do they know in-advance that meteors are heading to earth?

Maybe I phrased it wrong I mean is there a system that tracks meteors outside our atmosphere , and does this system works as such?

Because this technology looks like some large audioscope that uses combined strength to pinpoint blasts all over the world... ?
edit on 23-2-2013 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


Telescopes are basically the only way of tracking asteroids outside of our atmosphere, but they only work well up to a point. Asteroids (even relatively big ones) are too small to reflect enough light so that they can be easily tracked if they are a long way away (a few days). Asteroids the size of the one that entered the atmosphere over Russia, when they are more than a few days away are basically invisible to us with current technology.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by 0bserver1
But do they know in-advance that meteors are heading to earth?

No.


Maybe I phrased it wrong I mean is there a system that tracks meteors outside our atmosphere , and does this system works as such?

If there's such a system, it's not the one you posted, as that uses only sound, and even if they "ear" the meteors before they entered the atmosphere, as they are supersonic, they could never "ear" them before they enter the atmosphere.


Because this technology looks like some large audioscope that uses combined strength to pinpoint blasts all over the world... ?

Yes, that's what it sounds like, but it's limited by the speed of sound and the atmosphere, as outside the atmosphere there's no sound.



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 02:14 AM
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It will be interesting when the data comes in from "ear" witnesses how far away the sound was heard. Up till now the loudest sound came from Krakatoa Volcano. Its booming sounds were heard over four hours later...

volcano.oregonstate.edu...



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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Sounds from this thing were awesome. In this one you can hear sonic booms for almost 2:30 seconds after the initial bang. They get quieter but are still heard at the very end.


Another angle:




posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


This same system of monitoring low-frequency sound alloiwed triangulation, after the fact, to determine the location of the meteor that exploded over Califirnia last year. It is so accurate, they were able to find several large pieces in very different locations.
www.space.com...

You do not cite a source for your 1st quote, and I'm not going to Google the quote, but I do not believe anyone knew of this object before it enbtered the atmosphere.

I understand that amateurs can "tap-in" to the network to follow meteor tracks thenselves.

jw



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 09:30 AM
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Must have been great news for the glazing industry on that day. I bet people selling windows made so much cash they could retire



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by intrptr
It will be interesting when the data comes in from "ear" witnesses how far away the sound was heard. Up till now the loudest sound came from Krakatoa Volcano. Its booming sounds were heard over four hours later...


I doubt it will beat Krakatoa. The main reason being that the Krakatoa blast occurred very low down in the atmosphere compared to the Russian fireball where the air is quite dense and sound waves propagate easily. At the altitude that the Russian fireball blast occurred, the air is so thin that the majority of the sound energy would fail to propagate through the air.

The blast was also tiny (500 kilotons of TNT) compared to Krakatoa (200 megatons of TNT) and even the Tunguska blast was not that big (10–15 megatons of TNT).



posted on Feb, 24 2013 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by 0bserver1
 


I understand what you're asking. And yes, they obviously were tracking this object as it passed through the atmosphere. But the thing is, the meteorite was travelling very fast. Even if there was someone to call and give warning to, it would have been over before anyone could do anything. Hope this helps.





 
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