The Known Universe by AMNH

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posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:48 AM
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Uploaded on Dec 15, 2009 The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, and quasar seen in the film is possible because of the world's most complete four-dimensional map of the universe, the Digital Universe Atlas that is maintained and updated by astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History. The new film, created by the Museum, is part of an exhibition, Visions of the Cosmos: From the Milky Ocean to an Evolving Universe, at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan through May 2010.




So anybody have any theories as to what is beyond the cosmic horizon, maybe more of the same?

What happens on this puny little planet is pretty insignificant when you truly consider the size of area in which this blue/green ball of rock floats, absolutely mind boggling.

Additionally, do you still think we're alone here?




posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 12:54 AM
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Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
What happens on this puny little planet is pretty insignificant when you truly consider the size of area in which this blue/green ball of rock floats, absolutely mind boggling.

I fundamentally disagree with this based on what we know of fractals. Change even the slightest portion and the entirety is changed. Doesn't mean we run the universe, but we don't change without the universe changing with us.

S&F
edit on 23-2-2013 by ErgoTheConclusion because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by ErgoTheConclusion

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
What happens on this puny little planet is pretty insignificant when you truly consider the size of area in which this blue/green ball of rock floats, absolutely mind boggling.

I fundamentally disagree with this based on what we know of fractals. Change even the slightest portion and the entirety is changed. Doesn't mean we run the universe, but we don't change without the universe changing with us.

S&F
edit on 23-2-2013 by ErgoTheConclusion because: (no reason given)


Truly staggering to comprehend but the possibilities could be endless



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:15 AM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 

It makes me happy beyond measure that you understood. /hug



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:20 AM
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I've seen a few of these zoom out videos but this is the best one yet, truly gives a sense of how small we actually are.



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:22 AM
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Originally posted by ErgoTheConclusion

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
What happens on this puny little planet is pretty insignificant when you truly consider the size of area in which this blue/green ball of rock floats, absolutely mind boggling.

I fundamentally disagree with this based on what we know of fractals. Change even the slightest portion and the entirety is changed. Doesn't mean we run the universe, but we don't change without the universe changing with us.

S&F
edit on 23-2-2013 by ErgoTheConclusion because: (no reason given)


As above so below...fractals make a lot of sense out of the micro-macro levels.

I'm with you on this perspective.

edit on 23-2-2013 by Sly1one because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 01:27 AM
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That was an interesting trip. It always worries me how much of our plantet's land area is dead soil when seen from space. Africa, the Mideast, across to India and much of central and North America, humans have cut back their forests to such an extent that Mars and us compete for the Solar Systems sandiest planets.

Why would they (the American Museum of Natural History) show the renments of the big bang as being in present time with earth? They obviously have evolved and changed by this time. So the vid is showing what earthlings have been able to see in "our time", and measures the universe backwards by billions of light years, not showing it as it is now. So this is a vid showing both the known universe and the universe back in time - two different concepts. And I wish they would have started at the quantum planck level and zoomed out from there, that would have been even more fun.

A question. How long will it take before the "dark spaces" in the galaxy map of the cosmos is filled in?

Thanks for posting this interesting view, and I'll save the vid in an "interesting topics" hidely hole I maintain.
edit on 23-2-2013 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 02:59 AM
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Originally posted by ErgoTheConclusion
reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 

It makes me happy beyond measure that you understood. /hug


I understand what you mean, but to think there's nothing more is just ignorant, we may not know what the "more" is just yet, hell we may never find that out, but I'd like to think we'll advance a lot more towards it in my lifetime



posted on Feb, 23 2013 @ 03:43 AM
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reply to post by Zcustosmorum
 

And the more we advance toward it, the more we'll understand how we've always been a part of it.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 04:30 PM
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Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
So anybody have any theories as to what is beyond the cosmic horizon, maybe more of the same?

What happens on this puny little planet is pretty insignificant when you truly consider the size of area in which this blue/green ball of rock floats, absolutely mind boggling.

Additionally, do you still think we're alone here?


It's indeed mind-blowing to think about such vast dimensions, thanks for posting the video!

Though I don't have any serious qualifications in this field of science, I still tend to believe we're living in a universe that's just one tiny part of a bigger multiverse. Reason: in the past, we always found out that every newly discovered part of our cosmos was just a small part of something bigger. Be it the Earth itself, the solar system, the milky way, local groups of galaxies, superclusters etc.

Perhaps we're just unable to measure the existence of a potential multiverse with our limited technical means. We're not even able to measure everything in our own universe as of yet, even though spacecraft like COBE and WMAP did some considerable work in determining the nature of the cosmic microwave background, which is linked to the birth of our universe and the processes that took place shortly after the big bang.

The PLANCK probe will probably provide more information on that, and perhaps allow for more detailed conclusions on what exactly makes our universe expand at about 70 km per second.

According to Wikipedia:


Planck is expected to yield definitive data on a number of astronomical issues, due for release in the first quarter of 2013


Apart from that, I don't think we're alone in this universe, but I still keep thinking about the Fermi-Paradox and why we're having a difficult time finding evidence for other species. On the other hand, it's probably just a matter of time ...

P.S.: S+F for an article that makes me think about the unthinkable ...





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