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Verbally Abused by a Ranting Mad Man - then not taken seriously by the police when incident reported

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posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by HelenConway
reply to post by Dispo
 


There are NOT two sides to this story,
I have clearly explained what happened.
I am telling the truth and nom nom did not say that - he asked me to explain the details again.


There are ALWAYS TWO sides to a story.

His account is 100% going to differ from yours. I'm banking that you're consistently inconveniencing this man and you were unaware of it.

Just because you don't know him, doesn't mean he doesn't know you. Maybe you're just oblivious to him, but you're on his radar because you park like a child and think you don't.

Just by saying there isn't two sides of the story proves to me that your version cannot be trusted.
edit on 22-2-2013 by Laykilla because: (no reason given)


Look laykilla if I came here and told you I had been beaten to near death - would you also insist that the victim was in the wrong,

I have relayed my story in good faith and explained with accuracy and candour what happened.

It seems to me that you support the actions of an angry aggressive man - birds of a feather ?




posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:43 PM
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unfortunately, relatively minor encounters are increasingly capable of turning nasty. i see it often. it's possibly a (inter)nationally suppressed anger coming to the fore what with the pressures of modern life. also, some people are just not very diplomatic.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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Don't let it bother you



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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You clearly don't, because that's not how it works. It's also peace, unless you are trolling Mr. Reese and his peanut butter chocolate treats.

The OP also says



However, nowhere in your post did you actually say he threatened you.

Because he didn't. He told you off, he said he didn't like you, probably called you the "B" word and a couple of other choice words.

He did not say he was going to strike you, choke you, rape you, attack you, steal from you, or harm you in anyway.

If he did, I'm sure it would have made it to your first telling of the story.

He didn't threaten you -- you're making it up, which further proves you're full of it. I bet you deserved to be screamed at.
edit on 22-2-2013 by Laykilla because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by RoScoLaz
 


yes I know - people explode and froth about absolute trivia, it is very worrying. Plus bullies are on the increase IMO.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


How about this?

From the description of events you have given, the man in question is horrible however the man in question would give a description of events which would vary wildly from your own. As we were not present at the incident, we cannot comment on whether or not you were in the right, as we only have your testimony, which is countered by that of the man.

Be rational and dispassionate - if you were reading this story from a person you did not know online, would you immediately jump to their defence or would you argue that you can't form an opinion without all the facts?



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by Laykilla
 


Section 5 public order act. You can be arrested for anything at all as long as the officer can justify it. Swearing in the presence of someone who may be offended by the swear word (interestingly, police are not allowed to be offended by swear words according to one judge, not sure if that was overturned at a higher court or not though) is an offence, as is acting in a threatening or aggressive manner e.g. waving your arms around or pacing angrily.

Watch some Britcops or something, the police love section 5, they can do anything with it. In fact, several prominent celebrities are involved with the reform section 5 movement, because you can literally be arrested for wearing an offensive t-shirt.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:51 PM
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Originally posted by Dispo
reply to post by HelenConway
 


How about this?

From the description of events you have given, the man in question is horrible however the man in question would give a description of events which would vary wildly from your own. As we were not present at the incident, we cannot comment on whether or not you were in the right, as we only have your testimony, which is countered by that of the man.

Be rational and dispassionate - if you were reading this story from a person you did not know online, would you immediately jump to their defence or would you argue that you can't form an opinion without all the facts?


I am recounting a personal event that happened to me, today.

This is not a court of law - I do not expect to be cross examined.

I could have made the whole thing up but i did not,

I would love to hear from people who have suffered similar abuse from horrible individuals and how they handled it,

I would love to hear similar stories from people who have been blatantly and casually dismissed by the police, despite a threat to their safety.

You know that saying ' pain is what the patient says it is'

well equally - feeling vulnerable and threatened is what the victim says it is - to a large degree,

I will not be bullied . I will not be threatened I will not allow this man to ruin my life and if he approaches me again I will ring 999.
edit on 22-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:55 PM
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that's a really unpleasant and unneccessary experience and i'm sorry some puce faced berk put you through that for no good reason. there has been some positive advice offered so far which i would second, especially regarding pcso's and i wholeheartedly agree that what happened was a breach of the peace.
i would suggest that when you go to the other police station to which you have been referred (and i recommend that you do), that you describe the event as such, state how threatened you feel and insist firmly and politely that your complaint is taken seriously..
it may be worth bearing in mind that this individual will again feel that he cannot get his car past yours - will he need to come to your door to do this? this may alter the power dynamic somewhat, causing him to be more polite as he is on your property, or alternatively if he is a raging fool again it gives you impetus to simply say to him that you are calling the police due to his threatening behaviour before you close the door. considering that you will have complained about his behaviour before and then he brings his attitude to your door, i feel that the police will then have to have a word with him at least.
by jove it's just not cricket



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:55 PM
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Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by HelenConway

Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by Laykilla
reply to post by HelenConway
 


It's not against the law to yell at someone, or be angry, or show it.

You could have walked away, but YOU chose to stand there and take it.

There is nothing for police to do here.

I suggest you grow thicker skin and learn to walk away from crazy people in the future.

Again, the man by your own account didn't do anything illegal or unlawful. If an officer was present, he could of asked him to leave...





It's called disturbing the piece here and you can be charged for it if you make enough noise....



Disturbing the peace can only be enforced in the presence of an officer. I.E. The officer would have had to bear witness himself. Also, you would be asked to vacate first.

99.9999% of the time. If you are drunk and just completely incoherent and causing a massive scene, you could be arrested.

Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.

Me thinks you haven't a clue how "Disturbing the peace" works at all.



No one was drunk - just a man threatening me. It is illegal I assure you.


I do know what disturbing the piece means, you can troll on to someone else's post if you want because you seem to want an argument here. Maybe you are the guy she is talking about?
edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


You clearly don't, because that's not how it works. It's also peace, unless you are trolling Mr. Reese and his peanut butter chocolate treats.

The OP also says

No one was drunk - just a man threatening me. It is illegal I assure you.


However, nowhere in your post did you actually say he threatened you.

Because he didn't. He told you off, he said he didn't like you, probably called you the "B" word and a couple of other choice words.

He did not say he was going to strike you, choke you, rape you, attack you, steal from you, or harm you in anyway.

If he did, I'm sure it would have made it to your first telling of the story.

He didn't threaten you -- you're making it up, which further proves you're full of it. I bet you deserved to be screamed at.
edit on 22-2-2013 by Laykilla because: (no reason given)


Sorry, but you haven't a clue about the laws in the UK here. Check and you will see what I mean.
She was verbally abused and you are on his side for some strange reason.
She didn't deserve this from anyone and was within her rights to report it. Good for her.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by Dispo
reply to post by Laykilla
 


Section 5 public order act. You can be arrested for anything at all as long as the officer can justify it. Swearing in the presence of someone who may be offended by the swear word (interestingly, police are not allowed to be offended by swear words according to one judge, not sure if that was overturned at a higher court or not though) is an offence, as is acting in a threatening or aggressive manner e.g. waving your arms around or pacing angrily.

Watch some Britcops or something, the police love section 5, they can do anything with it. In fact, several prominent celebrities are involved with the reform section 5 movement, because you can literally be arrested for wearing an offensive t-shirt.


or for singing ' Kung Fu Fighting ' in an Isle of wight bar !


Simon Ledger says he fears he will end up with a criminal record for performing the 1974 disco classic at a seafront bar on the Isle of Wight on Sunday after two people walking past apparently took offence.

The 34-year-old, from the island, regularly features Carl Douglas’s 1974 number one hit in his set when he performs at the Driftwood Beach Bar in Sandown


www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by HelenConway

Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by Laykilla
reply to post by HelenConway
 


It's not against the law to yell at someone, or be angry, or show it.

You could have walked away, but YOU chose to stand there and take it.

There is nothing for police to do here.

I suggest you grow thicker skin and learn to walk away from crazy people in the future.

Again, the man by your own account didn't do anything illegal or unlawful. If an officer was present, he could of asked him to leave...





It's called disturbing the piece here and you can be charged for it if you make enough noise....



Disturbing the peace can only be enforced in the presence of an officer. I.E. The officer would have had to bear witness himself. Also, you would be asked to vacate first.

99.9999% of the time. If you are drunk and just completely incoherent and causing a massive scene, you could be arrested.

Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.

Me thinks you haven't a clue how "Disturbing the peace" works at all.



No one was drunk - just a man threatening me. It is illegal I assure you.


I do know what disturbing the piece means, you can troll on to someone else's post if you want because you seem to want an argument here. Maybe you are the guy she is talking about?
edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Think you will find shouting is included here :




What Constitutes Disturbing the Peace? Disturbing the peace laws vary from state to state. Generally, disturbing the peace refers to words or conduct that compromises the safety, health, morals or overall peace and quiet of the public. Disturbing the peace charges cover a variety of conduct and often falls under the broader "catch-all" category of disorderly conduct. Some examples of disorderly conduct include: Fighting or challenging someone to fight in a public place Using offensive words in a public place likely to incite violence Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity Bullying a student on or near school grounds Knocking loudly on hotel doors of sleeping guests with the purpose of annoying them Holding an unlawful public assembly Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home over an extended period of time Allowing excessive dog barking in a residential area, and Intentionally playing loud music during the night that continues, even after a fair warning.

edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Did you even read what you cited? It cited, it's not against the law to yell at someone. That's what it says. Read it again.


"Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity"


He didn't intend to incite violence or unlawful activity.

Here we have another perfect example;


"Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home over an extended period of time"


It's legal to shout profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home, just not over EXTENDED periods of time.

Again, I'll repeat;


Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.


The bold and underlined portion is an example of Disturbing the Peace.


This is America. We have freedom of speech, this gives me the right to express how I feel about you to your face as long as it doesn't cross the line into actual harassment. [Which is connotated by repeat or excessive offenses.]


P.S.

I'm not angry, I don't yell at people. I don't yell at people who yell at me... I don't troll them either and feed the fuel to the fire.

I do the adult thing, I walk away. If I see this person frequently, when they are calmed down, I will go talk to them about it. If they are a stranger, I could care less.



edit on 22-2-2013 by Laykilla because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


I am not cross examining you, I am explaining why I can not and will not sit here and tell you how strong you were and how horrible that man was, because I do not know what happened, all I have is the word of a person on the internet who claims to be telling a true and accurate story. I cannot verify it. The truth often lies in the middle anyway, if you're the mail and he's the guardian, I wouldn't accept either of your stories, I'd find out the facts and work out what actually happened by comparing the accounts.

Do you understand why the police couldn't act on your story?



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by skalla
 


thanks skalla - I am actually scared of him now - to be honest, it makes me worried to walk my sisters dogs, which would mean I would have to walk past his house, it makes me worried to visit my sister, who i normally see daily,



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by HelenConway

Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by Laykilla
reply to post by HelenConway
 


It's not against the law to yell at someone, or be angry, or show it.

You could have walked away, but YOU chose to stand there and take it.

There is nothing for police to do here.

I suggest you grow thicker skin and learn to walk away from crazy people in the future.

Again, the man by your own account didn't do anything illegal or unlawful. If an officer was present, he could of asked him to leave...





It's called disturbing the piece here and you can be charged for it if you make enough noise....



Disturbing the peace can only be enforced in the presence of an officer. I.E. The officer would have had to bear witness himself. Also, you would be asked to vacate first.

99.9999% of the time. If you are drunk and just completely incoherent and causing a massive scene, you could be arrested.

Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.

Me thinks you haven't a clue how "Disturbing the peace" works at all.



No one was drunk - just a man threatening me. It is illegal I assure you.


I do know what disturbing the piece means, you can troll on to someone else's post if you want because you seem to want an argument here. Maybe you are the guy she is talking about?
edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Think you will find shouting is included here :




What Constitutes Disturbing the Peace? Disturbing the peace laws vary from state to state. Generally, disturbing the peace refers to words or conduct that compromises the safety, health, morals or overall peace and quiet of the public. Disturbing the peace charges cover a variety of conduct and often falls under the broader "catch-all" category of disorderly conduct. Some examples of disorderly conduct include: Fighting or challenging someone to fight in a public place Using offensive words in a public place likely to incite violence Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity Bullying a student on or near school grounds Knocking loudly on hotel doors of sleeping guests with the purpose of annoying them Holding an unlawful public assembly Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home over an extended period of time Allowing excessive dog barking in a residential area, and Intentionally playing loud music during the night that continues, even after a fair warning.

edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Did you even read what you cited? It cited, it's not against the law to yell at someone. That's what it says. Read it again.


"Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity"


He didn't intent to incite violence or unlawful activity.

Here we have another perfect example;


"Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home [over an extended period of time"


It's legal to shout profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home, just not over EXTENDED periods of time.

Again, I'll repeat;


Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.


The bold and underlined portion is an example of Disturbing the Peace.


This is America. We have freedom of speech, this gives me the right to express how I feel about you to your face as long as it doesn't cross the line into actual harassment. [Which is connotated by repeat or excessive offenses.]

OP is in England and subject to English law, not American. This is not just for Americans to post but all over...



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by HelenConway
reply to post by skalla
 


thanks skalla - I am actually scared of him now - to be honest, it makes me worried to walk my sisters dogs, which would mean I would have to walk past his house, it makes me worried to visit my sister, who i normally see daily,


Don't be scared of him, he's just a bully like many on here. You were the better person for not reacting to him



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by Laykilla
 


And maybe this guy just has an out of this world anger control problem? I have run across of few of those over the years.Had one flip out because I told him at a white castle (didn't know him at all) that I couldn't come to his party due to my boyfriend waiting on me back home.The one and only time I needed a cop and they were there! The police officer saw how he was acting and jumped out of his car with his hand on his gun.The guy backed off then and fled.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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Originally posted by Laykilla
This is America. We have freedom of speech, this gives me the right to express how I feel about you to your face as long as it doesn't cross the line into actual harassment. [Which is connotated by repeat or excessive offenses.]



I do the adult thing, I walk away. If I see this person frequently, when they are calmed down, I will go talk to them about it. If they are a stranger, I could care less.



edit on 22-2-2013 by Laykilla because: (no reason given)


Actually NO this is Britain.

I am glad you COULD care less - that makes me feel so warm inside,

It would be awful if you couldn;t care less.
edit on 22-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 

Part of your problem is lack of evidence, of course.
Without witnesses, he can deny it even happened.
That may make life difficult on this complaint, but perhaps you can take precautions for future eventualities (get a voice recorder?).
If it happens more than once, it could be getting into the territory of Harassment, which is worth looking up.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by HelenConway

Originally posted by Laykilla

Originally posted by scotsdavy1

Originally posted by Laykilla
reply to post by HelenConway
 


It's not against the law to yell at someone, or be angry, or show it.

You could have walked away, but YOU chose to stand there and take it.

There is nothing for police to do here.

I suggest you grow thicker skin and learn to walk away from crazy people in the future.

Again, the man by your own account didn't do anything illegal or unlawful. If an officer was present, he could of asked him to leave...





It's called disturbing the piece here and you can be charged for it if you make enough noise....



Disturbing the peace can only be enforced in the presence of an officer. I.E. The officer would have had to bear witness himself. Also, you would be asked to vacate first.

99.9999% of the time. If you are drunk and just completely incoherent and causing a massive scene, you could be arrested.

Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.

Me thinks you haven't a clue how "Disturbing the peace" works at all.



No one was drunk - just a man threatening me. It is illegal I assure you.


I do know what disturbing the piece means, you can troll on to someone else's post if you want because you seem to want an argument here. Maybe you are the guy she is talking about?
edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Think you will find shouting is included here :




What Constitutes Disturbing the Peace? Disturbing the peace laws vary from state to state. Generally, disturbing the peace refers to words or conduct that compromises the safety, health, morals or overall peace and quiet of the public. Disturbing the peace charges cover a variety of conduct and often falls under the broader "catch-all" category of disorderly conduct. Some examples of disorderly conduct include: Fighting or challenging someone to fight in a public place Using offensive words in a public place likely to incite violence Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity Bullying a student on or near school grounds Knocking loudly on hotel doors of sleeping guests with the purpose of annoying them Holding an unlawful public assembly Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home over an extended period of time Allowing excessive dog barking in a residential area, and Intentionally playing loud music during the night that continues, even after a fair warning.

edit on 22-2-2013 by scotsdavy1 because: (no reason given)


Did you even read what you cited? It cited, it's not against the law to yell at someone. That's what it says. Read it again.


"Shouting in a public place intending to incite violence or unlawful activity"


He didn't intent to incite violence or unlawful activity.

Here we have another perfect example;


"Shouting profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home [over an extended period of time"


It's legal to shout profanities out of a car window in front of a person's home, just not over EXTENDED periods of time.

Again, I'll repeat;


Telling someone off is not illegal. Telling someone off for 20 minutes and challenging them to a fight, and throwing things around and being disorderly and disruptive to numerous people in a public space is a different story.


The bold and underlined portion is an example of Disturbing the Peace.


This is America. We have freedom of speech, this gives me the right to express how I feel about you to your face as long as it doesn't cross the line into actual harassment. [Which is connotated by repeat or excessive offenses.]

OP is in England and subject to English law, not American. This is not just for Americans to post but all over...


That may be so, but the law in this regard is not any different.




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