Researchers Develop ‘Zombie’ Cells That Can Increase Performance After Death

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posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 01:52 PM
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So basically the cell becomes partially shielded from external harm via some sort of hardening silica.

"The hardening silica forms a type of “permeable armor” around the protein in the living cells, which allows researchers to test them at temperatures and pressures far exceeding those in nature."

Then after the cell dies it becomes almost fossilized in a mummified manner?

lasvegas.cbslocal.com...

However using the silicic acid allows the cell to perform better and survive extreme conditions becoming practically embalmed alive.
en.wikipedia.org...

Able to survive extreme temperature and other conventionally harmful stimuli.
energy.gov...

Then once the cells are dead or killed by heat they leave a structure behind reminiscent of a 3D model.

" By heating the silica to high temperatures, experiments show the cell can be reverse molded. In other words, in the same way that burning wood in air leaves a residue of structureless soot, the zombie heating method results in a high-quality carbon structure. Subsequent dissolution of the underlying silica support decreased the cell’s electrical resistance by approximately 20 times. Such materials would have substantial utility in fuel cells, decontamination and sensor technologies."
edit on 21-2-2013 by paratus because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-2-2013 by paratus because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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If you had bothered to use the search function...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

...You would see that this topic is already being covered.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
If you had bothered to use the search function...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

...You would see that this topic is already being covered.


I bothered an it did not work, thanks for being polite...
However this thread is a bit more precise and had different sources and also has different focuses.
edit on 21-2-2013 by paratus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


Wow Infinity, that's a pretty rude way to be helpful.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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Summing up, Kaehr offers what may be the first distinction in scientific literature between a mummy cell and a zombie cell: "King Tut was mummified," he said, "to approximately resemble his living self, but the process took place without mineralization [a process of fossilization]. Our zombie cells bridge chemistry and biology to create forms that not only near-perfectly resemble their past selves but can do future work."

So I think their main focus referencing zombies is that after death of the cell they can be used (after removing the silicates) in nanotech, biotech and other applications.

See here:
Cellular complexity captured in durable
silica biocomposites
cntc.unm.edu...
edit on 21-2-2013 by paratus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by paratus
 




I bothered an it did not work, thanks for being polite...
However this thread is a bit more precise and had different sources and also has different focuses.


You're entirely welcome. And thanks for creating a duplicate thread instead of using the ATS search engine that I used in order to find the link I posted in my previous entry.

If it didn't work the first time, try again.
edit on 21-2-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by paratus
 




I bothered an it did not work, thanks for being polite...
However this thread is a bit more precise and had different sources and also has different focuses.


You're entirely welcome. And thanks for creating a duplicate thread instead of using the ATS search engine that I used in order to find the link I posted in my previous entry.

If it didn't work the first time, try again.
edit on 21-2-2013 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)


Why don't you try to search for my thread title and see what comes up.
See you later troll



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by paratus
 



Why don't you try to search for my thread title and see what comes up.
See you later troll


The same results I posted in my first entry in this thread. I'm not a troll, I'm just sick of people who don't follow the rules laid down by ATS moderators.

And besides, that article in itself irritates me because those cells are not zombie cells. They are android cells, biological designs supported by inorganic materials. That's not a zombie cell.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by paratus
 



Why don't you try to search for my thread title and see what comes up.
See you later troll



The same results I posted in my first entry in this thread. I'm not a troll, I'm just sick of people who don't follow the rules laid down by ATS moderators.

And besides, that article in itself irritates me because those cells are not zombie cells. They are android cells, biological designs supported by inorganic materials. That's not a zombie cell.


The Samuru search is not working.

I think you're confused, androids are robots made to mimic humans.
Bishop from Aliens is an android.
However they are only using the Zombie descriptor as a hot button.
The cell is useful for application after death in many tech fields upon processing.
edit on 21-2-2013 by paratus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by paratus
 



However they are only using the Zombie descriptor as a hot button.


This is what I'm getting at. Have you ever seen a metal zombie on The Walking Dead? No, I didn't think so.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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So is this thread turning out into an argument about ATS posting rules or is this thread gonna get closed for duplication? Right now its open, can we talk about Zombie cells or android cells or something ON TOPIC maybe...ist t that another rule....


So this could be useful in medical terms I think, I know that for organ transplants, they have to act really fast because the organ wont be good for use forever, Maybe this kind of discovery can help to prolong this duration and perhaps save more lives.
edit on 21-2-2013 by Teye22 because: (no reason given)





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