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What if Our Sun was part of a Binary Solar System?

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posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You are still wrong.

Refer to previous post giving details of WISE.




posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 08:24 AM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


You are still wrong.

Refer to previous post giving details of WISE.


Sorry, I'm not. You can insist I am, but I'm afraid that I'm not wrong.

WISE will NOT be doing another infrared survey.

They are instead "combining data" from the surveys.

They are NOT having WISE itself do an actual sky survey using the same instrument that was first used. They can't. It's out of coolant.

They did use less sensitive channels on it with what coolant that they had left.

By combining the data of the surveys, it is allowing scientists to look for things in the images that it already took for things that they may have missed.

Do you actually READ the articles you post?

So again, sorry, you can keep insisting I'm wrong, but you had better show us an article that says they are planing on refueling WISE's hydrogen coolant or placing another probe up to replace it.

Again: the article states they are combining data that has already been surveyed. They are not doing another survey with WISE again. They can't.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I posted about WISE data being used to find a binary star and that NASA believes this possible.

Here is the link I posted saying that they are expecting the data being analysed for mid 2013, and the quote.
www.astrobio.net...


We may not have an answer to the Nemesis question until mid-2013. WISE needs to scan the sky twice in order to generate the time-lapsed images astronomers use to detect objects in the outer solar system. The change in location of an object between the time of the first scan and the second tells astronomers about the object’s location and orbit. Then comes the long task of analyzing the data


I then posted a link with details from WISE that they already scanned the sky twice and are analysing the data (this is from Dec 6 2012)
www.jpl.nasa.gov...


WISE completed its all-sky survey in 2011, after surveying the entire sky twice at infrared wavelengths. The 16-inch (40-centimeter) telescope ran out of its coolant as expected in 2010, but went on to complete the second sky scan using two of its four infrared channels, which still functioned without coolant. At that time, the goal of the mission extension was to hunt for more near-Earth asteroids via a project called NEOWISE.

NASA has since funded the WISE team to combine all that data, allowing astronomers to study everything from nearby stars to distant galaxies. These next-generation all-sky images, part of a new project called "AllWISE," will be significantly more sensitive than those previously released, and will be publicly available in late 2013.





By scanning the whole sky with the improved AllWISE data, the team will sleuth out the true monsters of the bunch, clusters as big as thousands of times the mass of the Milky Way, assembled even earlier in the history of the universe.

Galaxy clusters from the first half of the universe are hard to find because they are so far away and because not very many had time to assemble by then. What's more, they are especially hard to see using visible-light telescopes: light that left these faraway structures in visible wavelengths has been stretched into longer, infrared wavelengths due to the expansion of space. WISE can hunt some of these rare colossal structures down because it scanned the whole sky in infrared light.

"I had pretty much written off using WISE to find distant galaxy clusters because we had to reduce the telescope diameter to only 16 inches [40 centimeters] to stay within our cost guidelines, so I am thrilled that we can find them after all," said Peter Eisenhardt, the WISE project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. and an author of the new paper. "The longer exposures from AllWISE open the door wide to see the most massive structures forming in the distant universe."






Other projects planned for the enhanced WISE data include the search for nearby, hidden cool stars, including those with masses as low as planets. If a large planet or tiny star does exist close to our solar system, an object some call "Tyche," then WISE's infrared data may reveal it.


Here's your opinion, which is wrong, read the report above and it will tell you that WISE already scanned the sky twice and that the data is being analysed, including it's use for finding such far and near objects as binary stars and ''Tyche''.

your opinion


Your news link is a few years old. Both the Hydrogen Cooling and funding itself for WISE ran out back in Oct. 2010. WISE was continued for NEOs for a while. The only way that WISE could perform another sky survey is if someone goes up and replaces that Hydrogen cooling.
edit on 22-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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Now now! No need to fling hate back and forth at each other. I made this thread as theory, just as I had recently come across the information. And you guy want to know something? You're ALL WRONG. None of our silly little hypothesis could be right, and none of them could be wrong. Who really knows? I just wanted to see what people thought about the information as I found its absolutely astounding.

We all guess, and make assumptions on what we feel is true. Quit bickering back and forth and just be open to the information! Not trying to prove each other wrong. You're not right, I'm not right. Nobody is.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 


Reports are reports, there's no point in saying they didn't scan all the sky twice when reports say they did, they are using the data. Including for binary searches.The program is ongoing right now, it didn't end in 2010. There's no point denying it.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:00 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


Sorry again, I'm not wrong.

It (WISE) is NOT doing another sky survey. You have not shown that it is doing that. Instead, you've repeated what I already said: they are using the existing data that was taken from the two sky surveys.

And that is exactly what I said. And the part of my post that you just quoted again, is NOT wrong. They are NOT using WISE itself to do another survey.

So no. I'm not wrong.

We can keep doing this all day if you'd like. Or instead, you could actually contribute something constructive to the thread.

Again: you seem to be a person with an ax to grind. As the mods say on here: Go after the BALL not the PLAYER.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 


Reports are reports, there's no point in saying they didn't scan all the sky twice when reports say they did, they are using the data. Including for binary searches.The program is ongoing right now, it didn't end in 2010. There's no point denying it.


I NEVER said they they had not surveyed the sky.

You are now fabricating things that I did not say. Please refrain from doing this in the future.

I said that they would not be doing any more surveys than the ones that they have already done using WISE itself.

Nor did I say that the program ended. I said that the probe itself has run out of hydrogen coolant.

Just LOVE how you like to try and turn things into something that they are not, or say that I said things that I did not.......


Please quote any post that I have made in this thread where I said "The WISE program has ended".

Please. I'd love for you to find that.
edit on 22-2-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:19 AM
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Now I see why they put this in skunk works when people just end up bickering and trying to prove they're right. Yawn. Quit trying to persuade each other because it's clearly not going to work.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:33 AM
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Originally posted by clairvoyantrose
Now I see why they put this in skunk works when people just end up bickering and trying to prove they're right. Yawn. Quit trying to persuade each other because it's clearly not going to work.


Actually your thread is in Skunk Works because it's a "Highly Speculative" subject, with little to no evidence to back it up.

Current observable data and evidence does not support our sun orbiting another celestial object.

Nor is there any evidence that the objects that have been suggested in this thread (IE Sirius, Pleiades, other visible stars) orbit our sun. Instead the evidence, physics and science prove quite otherwise.

Could their be a large object (IE brown dwarf or massive gas giant) out there orbiting our sun that has not been detected yet?

Possible. Highly speculative at this point as there is not enough supporting evidence.

Could that change?

Yes, possibly. New discoveries are made all the time.

But for now, the evidence does not support it, and is therefore "highly speculative".

That's what the Skunk Works forum is for. I've advocated for a name change to the forum, considering that some people may not understand what "Skunk Works" actually means. Think "Rogue Theories" and you get a better idea.
Skunk Works is an actual facility at Lockheed Martin.
edit on 22-2-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Tell yourself that.

I never said it was making another survey so stop using that as an excuse.

I posted valid information you said it was old and WISE stopped so was irrelevant.

I posted further information saying it isn't irrelevant, it is current information that WISE is ongoing, it surveyed the skies twice in infrared, they have further funding (you said it stopped 2010, it didn't therefore you are wrong) and are analysing the data and expecting to release more complete sensitive analysis on the data in mid to late 2013.

I never mentioned at any point at all about it scanning again. It already scanned TWICE as it was meant to, it worked with fewer channels still surveying deep space and ALL the skies. The data is being analysed NOW. It is CURRENT.


Here is the information I posted AGAIN.

www.jpl.nasa.gov...



WISE completed its all-sky survey in 2011, after surveying the entire sky twice at infrared wavelengths. The 16-inch (40-centimeter) telescope ran out of its coolant as expected in 2010, but went on to complete the second sky scan using two of its four infrared channels, which still functioned without coolant. At that time, the goal of the mission extension was to hunt for more near-Earth asteroids via a project called NEOWISE.

NASA has since funded the WISE team to combine all that data, allowing astronomers to study everything from nearby stars to distant galaxies. These next-generation all-sky images, part of a new project called "AllWISE," will be significantly more sensitive than those previously released, and will be publicly available in late 2013.



If you read the information I provided, it clearly says the survey was completed twice and was better than they imagined, so good they are able to use the data for many things including the search for Binary systems.




Other projects planned for the enhanced WISE data include the search for nearby, hidden cool stars, including those with masses as low as planets. If a large planet or tiny star does exist close to our solar system, an object some call "Tyche," then WISE's infrared data may reveal it.

edit on 22-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


The article you originally posted IS old. Sorry. No denying that.

I also said that the data so far is not supporting any large object orbiting our sun. Deny that.

I said that the WISE telescope can no longer be used as it first was because it is out of Hydrogen Coolant. Deny that.

I did not say that the program was over, and that the data was no longer being used. Again, please show this. You have not. Instead you have inserted words trying to defame me. Your time would be better spent contributing to the thread (you've done this in other threads too that I've book marked. I think it's about time to show the mods that you seem to have an ax to grind........).

You have tried to say that I've said things that I have not actually said, and I will not put up with that. From anyone.

Now, can we get on with the discussion, or are you going to continue to make posts about me?



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


My post:
www.astrobio.net...


We may not have an answer to the Nemesis question until mid-2013. WISE needs to scan the sky twice in order to generate the time-lapsed images astronomers use to detect objects in the outer solar system. The change in location of an object between the time of the first scan and the second tells astronomers about the object’s location and orbit. Then comes the long task of analyzing the data.


your reply:


Your news link is a few years old.

Both the Hydrogen Cooling and funding itself for WISE ran out back in Oct. 2010. WISE was continued for NEOs for a while.

The only way that WISE could perform another sky survey is if someone goes up and replaces that Hydrogen cooling.


My reply stating that WISE ALREADY DID THE SECOND SKY SURVEY AND HAS FUNDING FOR ANALYSING THE DATA which it is currently doing, including for Binary systems. And that FUNDING didn't run out in 2010, it is ONGOING and CURRENT.
www.jpl.nasa.gov...



WISE completed its all-sky survey in 2011, after surveying the entire sky twice at infrared wavelengths. The 16-inch (40-centimeter) telescope ran out of its coolant as expected in 2010, but went on to complete the second sky scan using two of its four infrared channels, which still functioned without coolant. At that time, the goal of the mission extension was to hunt for more near-Earth asteroids via a project called NEOWISE.

NASA has since funded the WISE team to combine all that data, allowing astronomers to study everything from nearby stars to distant galaxies. These next-generation all-sky images, part of a new project called "AllWISE," will be significantly more sensitive than those previously released, and will be publicly available in late 2013.

edit on 22-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 

Something like this? en dot wikipedia dot org/wiki/Nemesis_(hypothetical_star)




edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: correction
edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: correction
edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: addition of photo
edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: What's up, doc?



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by dragnik
reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 

Something like this? en dot wikipedia dot org/wiki/Nemesis_(hypothetical_star)


edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: correction
edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: correction
edit on 2/22/2013 by dragnik because: addition of photo


Here you go. Fixed your link for you:

Nemesis

And embed the picture too:

edit on 22-2-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer


January 1999 — NGSS is one of five missions selected for a Phase A study, with an expected selection in late 1999 of two of these five missions for construction and launch, one in 2003 and another in 2004. Mission cost is estimated at $139 million at this time.
March 1999 — WIRE infrared telescope spacecraft fails within hours of reaching orbit.
October 1999 — Winners of MIDEX study are awarded, and NGSS is not selected.
October 2001 — NGSS proposal is re-submitted to NASA as a MIDEX mission.
April 2002 — NGSS proposal is accepted by the NASA Explorer office to proceed as one of four MIDEX programs for a Pre-Phase A study.
December 2002 — NGSS changes its name to Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).
March 2003 — NASA releases a press release announcing WISE has been selected for an Extended Phase-A study, leading to a decision in 2004 on whether to proceed with the development of the mission.
April 2003 — Ball Aerospace is selected as the spacecraft provider for the WISE mission.
April 2004 — WISE is selected as NASA's next MIDEX mission. WISE's cost is estimated at $208 million at this time.
November 2004 — NASA selects the Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University to build the telescope for WISE.
October 2006 — WISE is confirmed for development by NASA and authorized to proceed with development. Mission cost at this time is estimated to be $300 million.
December 14, 2009 — WISE successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.
December 29, 2009 — WISE successfully jettisoned instrument cover. January 6, 2010 — WISE first light image released.
January 14, 2010 — WISE begins its regular four wavelength survey scheduled for nine months duration. It is expected to cover 99% of the sky with overlapping images in the first 6 months and continuing with a second pass until the hydrogen coolant is exhausted about three months later.
January 25, 2010 — WISE detects a never-before-seen near earth asteroid, designated 2010 AB78.[32]
February 11, 2010 — WISE detects a previously unknown comet, designated P/2010 B2 (WISE).[33]
February 25, 2010 — WISE website reports it has surveyed over a quarter of the sky to a depth of 7 overlapping image frames.
April 10, 2010 — WISE website reports it has surveyed over half of the sky to a depth of 7 overlapping image frames.
May 26, 2010 — WISE website reports it has surveyed over three-quarters of the sky to a depth of 7 overlapping image frames.
July 16, 2010 — Press release announces that total sky coverage will be completed on July 17, 2010.[34] About half of the sky will be mapped again before the instrument's block of solid hydrogen coolant sublimes and is exhausted.
October 2010 — WISE hydrogen coolant runs out. Start of NASA Planetary Division funded NEOWISE mission.
January 2011 — Entire sky surveyed to an image density of at least 16+ frames (i.e. second scan of sky completed).
February 17, 2011 — WISE Spacecraft transmitter turned off at 12:00 noon PST by Principal Investigator Ned Wright. The Spacecraft will remain in hibernation without ground contacts awaiting possible future use.[35]
April 14, 2011 — Preliminary release of data covering 57 percent of the sky as seen by WISE.[36]
July 27, 2011 — First Earth Trojan asteroid discovered from WISE data.[15][16]
August 23, 2011 — WISE confirms the existence of a new class of brown dwarf, the Y dwarf. Some of these stars appear to have temperatures less than 300 K, close to room temperature at about 25C. Y dwarfs show ammonia absorption, in addition to methane and water absorption bands displayed by T dwarfs.[17][18]
March 14, 2012 — Release of the WISE All-Sky data to the scientific community.[37]
August 29, 2012 — WISE reveals millions of black-holes.[38]


I never said that it did not take it's surveys. It did run out of it's coolant. Funding for it's original mission was finished. New funding for NEO was given.
Then it was turned off for possible future missions.

On September 20, 2012, WISE was successfully contacted to check its status.

From your own sources:


NASA has since funded the WISE team to combine all that data, allowing astronomers to study everything from nearby stars to distant galaxies.


So again. The space craft itself is done. Unless they turn it on to do more surveys with the much less sensitive equipment

However, the project has new funding to combine the data that they have to find new objects.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 01:10 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


My sources and quotes are obviously useful in re educating you about WISE and it's current status then, seeing as your opinion prior to me posting them was based on something from 2010 and far from accurate. I won't expect your thanks:

your quote


Your news link is a few years old.

Both the Hydrogen Cooling and funding itself for WISE ran out back in Oct. 2010. WISE was continued for NEOs for a while.

The only way that WISE could perform another sky survey is if someone goes up and replaces that Hydrogen cooling.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


My sources and quotes are obviously useful in re educating you about WISE and it's current status then, seeing as your opinion prior to me posting them was based on something from 2010 and far from accurate. I won't expect your thanks:

your quote


Your news link is a few years old.

Both the Hydrogen Cooling and funding itself for WISE ran out back in Oct. 2010. WISE was continued for NEOs for a while.

The only way that WISE could perform another sky survey is if someone goes up and replaces that Hydrogen cooling.


My "opinion" as you so quaintly put it was not based on old news.

WISE no longer has the hydrogen coolant. Period.

The WISE telescope itself has not been used since it was shut down except back in Sept. 2012 to do a status check. Period.

Your original article was dated 2010. Old news. Period.

Your NEW article was more recent.
Your NEW article shows that the data that was collected from the 2 surveys that WISE did will be combined and researched again, with the results released later this year. This is not the WISE telescope itself being used (apparently you can't seem to get that through your brain). The DATA that was collected from it is what will be used.

No, you will not receive any "thanks" from me as I was never wrong in the first place. I also do not "thank" people who stalk, seem to have an ax to grind, pick arguments where none exist, who miss quote, or just out right lie about what I said. Nor do I "thank" someone that help majorly derail a thread simply because they can't STAND to not have the last word.

I've proven my point several times in this thread, and the last few posts from you do not change it at all.

Since it is very obvious that at this point you are simply trying to (and have been) trying to pick a fight with me over something that I never exclaimed in the first place, and since I have beyond a shadow of a doubt shown several times that I'm correct in that the WISE telescope itself is not being used right now, nor has been used for many, many months, and that the new project is using it's data that it has already transmitted, replying to you further on this thread would be pointless and would only continue to derail it.

To the OP: I apologize for the hijacking of your thread and having it removed quite far from your topic. I hope that from this point that theabsolutetruth will also stop posting off topic and derailing your thread.

Cheers.
edit on 22-2-2013 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Get outta' here ya big bully


All jokes of course!
...and this post isn't helping to get the thread back on topic here! Guilty as you are.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by dragnik
 


Yes my friend! Just like that! I haven't heard about Nemsis until now!



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by clairvoyantrose
 




The sun and moon are out of the clouds, clearly known.
The bright star appears ABOVE the clouds - as if it cannot be ignored, or covered by clouds

Being passed down from the star, down the ladder, is a gold heart (top), an anchor and a cross. In the second image, we do not see a heart, but a hand handing down a cup. Cup, life. Anchor, adventure/seeking advancement of knowledge. Cross. Faith.
Perhaps these are symbols, but I won't go into that. Is the bright star the core of this universe, giving all to those from the room - who have discarded other things.

Also, the directions on the painting clearly put the image lined up with 'East', not the proposed North star.
---



In this image you can see that we are attached to the sun. Not sure what the device is on the ground, but perhaps an anchor of sorts?

I believe that the center image is the people's belief that our Sun is our true source of life (heat, etc).
However, that planet is to the right, depicting stars around it. It suggests that this is a side-note to the common belief. It says "You are not the center of everything. This planet clearly has stars around it as well."


The image on the left though is one giant star with a ring around it.
Not sure if the ring suggests "all things revolve around this star" (not literally, but as in the star providing life to all).
---

Yes, it is Masonic and symbolism is big, but I've chosen to go further into that in this post. Hope this helps someone who knows more about space





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