Project Mayhem target was actually a Museum (Fight Club)

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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Howdy ATS,

I read Fight Club this morning. I read the book a few years ago but somehow overlooked this, or didn't think it mattered, just missed it. Fight Club is in my top 5 if not 3 favorite films of all time. I've seen it probably 20 times & usually with films the book is better, but with fight club its just different.

So in the 1st chapter this morning I noticed it and waited for it to be elaborated on, but it never was. For those of you unfamiliar with the movie in the end Project Mayhem destroys credit card companies, eliminating debt.. Which is fine but to me targeting a national museum says more.

This is what it says in the book.



The demolition team will hit the primary charge in maybe eight minutes. The primary charge will blow the base charge, the foundation columns will crumble, and the photo series of the Parker-Morris Building will go into all the history books.

The five-picture time-lapse series. Here, the building’s standing. Second picture, the building will be at an eighty-degree angle. Then a seventy-degree angle. The building’s at a forty-five-degree angle in the fourth picture when the skeleton starts to give and the tower gets a slight arch to it. The last shot, the tower, all one hundred and ninety-one floors, will slam down on the national museum which is Tyler’s real target.

“This is our world, now, our world,” Tyler says, “and those ancient people are dead.”


Then there is no mention for the remainder of the book as to why the museum is being targeted. Just that same quote repeated a few times. “This is our world, now, our world, and those ancient people are dead.” At times it almost comes across like Tyler has disdain for ancient peoples.

Idk, I just think this may have been a better ending to the movie. Well, our "hero" also dies in the end of the book and that would've been better to me as well, to illustrate the points that Fight Club and Project Mayhem had become bigger than Tyler/Jack/Joe & also that without sacrifice we would have nothing.

To eliminate the debt record is one thing, economic collapse would lead to anarchy but at some point may pick up close to where it left off.

To destroy historical records though, on the scale of demolishing "the" national museum, priceless.. once again the winners would rewrite history and maybe this time at least 1/2 of it would be true.

Or was the point to just start over and have no history.. Idk, fun food for thought to me though.



Oh! I found a reference to "burn the museums" in a trailer for the movie too. Forgot to include it.

edit on 19-2-2013 by 1/2 Nephilim because: forgot the video




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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I've read Fight Club more times than I can count, and a lot of the more subtle tones of the book are overlooked in the movie (though, the movie is one of my favorites as well).

The point of destroying the museum is to destroy something beautiful. It is best illustrated in another scene that was changed in the movie. When Tyler and the narrator meet on the nude beach, Tyler is setting up driftwood so that the shadow, at one precise moment, will made a hand. It takes him a llng time and a lot of work to set them all up-for one single moment when the sun is in the correct position in the sky.

The character of Tyler believes that perfection does, and can, only exist for a moment. And the things that people think perfect their lives (art, for example) are a way of removing oneself from the perfection that is the moment, even in pain and destruction.

Not sure how clearly I worded all of that, but thats what I have always taken from it.

ETA: I hadnt seen that trailer before. That was fantastic.
edit on 19-2-2013 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Yeah! Absolutely.. Good feedback. To destroy a museum just fits so much better in the sense that self-destruction is the path to enlightenment. Sometimes we have to forget who we were to see who we are. The movie really did fairy-tale the ending.. his moment in the sun, his finale was down-played to he and Marla possibly living happily ever after to the drum of "The Pixies".

So was it really all just about destroying something beautiful to despite his father? Pee'ing on the Blarney Stone and smashing Jared Leto's blonde face was just a precursor to that. If he was breathing smoke after destroying the kids face was destroying the museum "breathing fire"? I don't get how while he was walking around like a Zen Master after Fight Clubs Tyler was off in the background setting up the destruction of a national museum. I suppose Tyler was the one with the rage issue from the get go though..



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by 1/2 Nephilim
 


Gotta say, I love discussing the deeper aspects of this book-usually, when it gets brought up, all people can talk about is "Was he dead at the end or in an insane asylum?" Good stuff!

All of the zen stuff, to me, was another deflection of the narrator's self. He was stuffing his pain deep down, which is what created 'Tyler' in the first place. He was separating from pain, through 'stuff', through the zen, through the support groups, and in turn, separated him from his 'Tyler' self.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 07:05 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Same here, love discussing it. I've had that same conversation a few times with people about what the last chapter really means. I think its open for interpretation.. Personally I just think it was meant to be semi-comedic & almost how Jack would have perceived "heaven". Finally no trouble getting those lipstick red secanols and little reminders of his accomplishments here and there. I like the book ending more because you got to see that he and Marla really did have a connection but when it came down to it.. they're romantic nightly strolls through the garden among the space monkeys in tow with candlelight, but achieving his moment of perfection was more important than either of them.

Your right about that Zen part, its deflection. There was one line where he says how he is pissed off noone is noticing his level of enlightenment and its such a hypocritical thing to say, just funny. Since you like talking about it I'll add, I wish they had included the perfume/note chapter in the movie. Its just another great example of how the slightest bit of rebelling can result in horrific consequences you never would have imagined. It's perfectly similar to him literally beating himself up, leading to what it did.. an organization bigger than him that lived beyond his "completion".



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 07:35 AM
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Originally posted by 1/2 Nephilim
I've seen it probably 20 times & usually with films the book is better, but with fight club its just different.


I disagree. I think it should have ended how the book did.


Well, our "hero" also dies in the end of the book


Or does he? Was the final scene of the book Heaven or a mental institution? Was the guy who said the were with Tyler awaiting his orders an angel or an orderly? Was the guy behind the desk God or a doctor?

That's the beauty of the end of the book. It leaves it up to your interpretation. Way better than the end of the movie. Really think they should have ended the movie that way. Instead they gave it a "happy Hollywood ending" where the protagonist/narrator lives and gets the girl.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by LazarusTsiyr
 


Classic example of you should read the replies!



Originally posted by LazarusTsiyr
I disagree. I think it should have ended how the book did.


said it in the OP right before saying he dies.


Originally posted by 1/2 Nephilim
Idk, I just think this may have been a better ending to the movie. Well, our "hero" also dies in the end of the book and that would've been better to me as well, to illustrate the points that Fight Club and Project Mayhem had become bigger than Tyler/Jack/Joe & also that without sacrifice we would have nothing.


Then you say


Originally posted by LazarusTsiyr
That's the beauty of the end of the book. It leaves it up to your interpretation. Way better than the end of the movie. Really think they should have ended the movie that way. Instead they gave it a "happy Hollywood ending" where the protagonist/narrator lives and gets the girl.


I'm with ya! Its up there ^


Originally posted by 1/2 Nephilim
I think its open for interpretation.

I like the book ending more because you got to see

The movie really did fairy-tale the ending..


No need to disagree, Thanks for contributing to the thread.





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