Freemason ring?

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:01 PM
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When my grandfather passed away he gave 2 rings. He was a 32 degree Freemason.

This is the ring he gave me, it is in cased in a pyramid, just like the one in the second image.



The second ring is a coin wring, its gold and has this coin in it.


I do not know much about my grand father, i only meat him a couple times when I was younger. I am wondering why he gave them to me, I am sure they represent something that was very important to him. I do not know much about the symbols, I know that the 14 degree ring can represent Scottish Rite Mason and is worn by both 32nd degree and 14 degree but why is it all so worn by 32nd degree's?




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:12 PM
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The Fourteen Degrees are of the York Rite of Masonry as I understand it, and the Thirty Second Degrees are of the Scottish Rite. I have seen information that states that the degrees are transferable across the two separate rites but of course the reliability of this information by its nature is questionable.

Kind regards



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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Originally posted by hotel1
The Fourteen Degrees are of the York Rite of Masonry as I understand it, and the Thirty Second Degrees are of the Scottish Rite. I have seen information that states that the degrees are transferable across the two separate rites but of course the reliability of this information by its nature is questionable.

Kind regards


Ok so your saying if he wear to join york rite he would be a 14 degree, even though he got 32nd in the Scottish rite? I am guessing because their is more information in the york rite then the Scottish rite?



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Do you know when your grandfather went to the Scottish Rite?
In years past, the 14th degree ring was given to masons who went through the Scottish Rite along with a hat, a book (long ago was Morals and Dogma, more recently A Bridge to Light) and a few pins and buttons. Since the price of Gold skyrocketed, they started (in my jurisdiction at least) to give the rings encased in the pyramid. I went through in 2007 and have the same ring in the pyramid you showed here.

I am not sure about the coin ring.

I would bet your grandfather thought you would make a fine mason and that is why he left you those.
I sure wish I could have a few conversations with my grandfather now that I am older and can appreciate what knowledge he tried to give. But being the smartest teenager that ever lived (until my children all became teens that is) I wasn't interested in his "mumbo jumbo" stuff at the time. Good ole hindsight.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by hotel1
The Fourteen Degrees are of the York Rite of Masonry as I understand it, and the Thirty Second Degrees are of the Scottish Rite. I have seen information that states that the degrees are transferable across the two separate rites but of course the reliability of this information by its nature is questionable.

Kind regards


Ok so your saying if he wear to join york rite he would be a 14 degree, even though he got 32nd in the Scottish rite? I am guessing because their is more information in the york rite then the Scottish rite?


Yeah that is as I said was my understanding of the information I was shown, but I cannot attest to the accuracy.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:21 PM
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This is just a coinscidence, as soon as i opened this thread the car in front of me had a masonic sticker in the back.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by ElOmen
This is just a coinscidence, as soon as i opened this thread the car in front of me had a masonic sticker in the back.



Ahhh I hope your not using the internet while driving.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by hotel1
 


Actually they are two separate rights, and not interchangeable to each other. Yes, they are both additional avenues for masons to take, like the Shrine. The York Rite has individual degrees that must be worked, while the Scottish Rite is a series of plays that you watch and receive the 4-32nd degree during the reunion. (Again, in my jurisdiction)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by ElOmen
This is just a coinscidence, as soon as i opened this thread the car in front of me had a masonic sticker in the back.



Ahhh I hope your not using the internet while driving.


That's what I was thinking. Might best stick to texting...



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Only on traffic lights. ill check and suscribe to read later.
Dont worry im usually the guy that is always alert trying to avoid reckless drivers.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by hotel1
 


Actually they are two separate rights, and not interchangeable to each other. Yes, they are both additional avenues for masons to take, like the Shrine. The York Rite has individual degrees that must be worked, while the Scottish Rite is a series of plays that you watch and receive the 4-32nd degree during the reunion. (Again, in my jurisdiction)



I will happily accept that you have a better knowledge of this subject than me. I got the information from an Uncle who was a high ranking police officer, and a mason of the blue degrees.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Do you know when your grandfather went to the Scottish Rite?
In years past, the 14th degree ring was given to masons who went through the Scottish Rite along with a hat, a book (long ago was Morals and Dogma, more recently A Bridge to Light) and a few pins and buttons. Since the price of Gold skyrocketed, they started (in my jurisdiction at least) to give the rings encased in the pyramid. I went through in 2007 and have the same ring in the pyramid you showed here.

I am not sure about the coin ring.

I would bet your grandfather thought you would make a fine mason and that is why he left you those.
I sure wish I could have a few conversations with my grandfather now that I am older and can appreciate what knowledge he tried to give. But being the smartest teenager that ever lived (until my children all became teens that is) I wasn't interested in his "mumbo jumbo" stuff at the time. Good ole hindsight.


He died in 2005. I was under the impression that the ring was molded after he died. No one ever told me that, just a assumption. Its interesting that they gave the ring to him in this mold. I thought it was supposed to be worn to show others. But come to think of it I think he did he a double head eagle ring.

I found this site
tsl.org...
In the about us section it says the Summit Lighthouse is the official source for Teachings of the Ascended Masers. It seems the ring dose have something to do with his teachings. I am still confused.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by hotel1
 

The York Rite has individual degrees that must be worked, while the Scottish Rite is a series of plays that you watch and receive the 4-32nd degree during the reunion. (Again, in my jurisdiction)



Could you give some real time examples of this? I am having trouble understanding what you mean by individual degree's and a series of play's. Are you saying that in the York Rite you earn degree's step by step while in Scottish rite you learn a multitude of teaching witch can progress you from a 3rd degree to a 7th degree?


Is their a time period in to earn degree's? Could you progress to a 32nd degree in a year?
edit on 19-2-2013 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The 14th degree ring is in the plastic pyramid because it's not real gold, it's a replica. That's the way they are presented to new SR masons. You are free to purchase a real ring on your own, but the ring is not included in your initiation dues. (around $300 when I did it)

The coin ring apparently has to do with another fraternal order.
tsl.org...
From your link. He must have had membership in several different orders. To my knowledge, the second is not a masonic group.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by hotel1
 


I am a 32nd degree SR mason but am not a member of the York Rite. There are a few members here who are either York Rite or both. I don't know much more about the York than I mentioned, but I do know a bit about the SR.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by hotel1
 

The York Rite has individual degrees that must be worked, while the Scottish Rite is a series of plays that you watch and receive the 4-32nd degree during the reunion. (Again, in my jurisdiction)



Could you give some real time examples of this? I am having trouble understanding what you mean by individual degree's and a series of play's. Are you saying that in the York Rite you earn degree's step by step while in Scottish rite you learn a multitude of teaching witch can progress you from a 3rd degree to a 7th degree?


Is their a time period in to earn degree's? Could you progress to a 32nd degree in a year?
edit on 19-2-2013 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)


In the SR Southern Jurisdiction, you go to what's called a reunion. You must first be a 3rd degree master mason in good standing. Then you go to what is usually a weekend class. You watch a series of plays that teach lessons in morality and masonic history. There is a minimum you must see in order to finish the class, but it can be a little as 5 plays (degrees) an maximum of 29. The 29 plays usually takes about 4 days to do everything and is not done very often. So you go from being a 3rd degree master mason to being a 32nd degree SR mason in a weekend. That's why we keep trying to tell everyone that the degrees don't mean all that much as far as rank.

I am on a few degree teams and we dress up in costumes and practice our parts just like any other theatrical production would do. It's a lot of fun and fellowship.

Please ask any questions you may have. I will answer anything I can.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The 14th degree ring is in the plastic pyramid because it's not real gold, it's a replica. That's the way they are presented to new SR masons. You are free to purchase a real ring on your own, but the ring is not included in your initiation dues. (around $300 when I did it)

The coin ring apparently has to do with another fraternal order.
tsl.org...
From your link. He must have had membership in several different orders. To my knowledge, the second is not a masonic group.


Makes sense, I was thinking, WOW they can afford to give their members gold rings. The lodge he was in was small, in a small town in Texas. All though it seems that the ring is gold, it has the same texture, it all so has a inscribing in it. I cant read all of it, wish I had a magnify glass, the first word is virtus. Does your have inscribing in it as well?
Maybe he was in another fraternity, I hope this ring leads me to the right place. I do not know much about the man. I thought he was 14 degree until I read his obituary. Not much information on the net about him either. I only know that he was a 32nd degree and worked at a high security mental institution. (witch leaves allot of room for imagination) Their is allot of unanswered questions and suspicious pertaining to me and my family. I am looking for answers while keeping a skeptical barrier.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 

The first ring is a pretty standard ring to see in the Scottish Rite. I have several friends, not Masons, who have coin rings. That looks like a very nice ring. I'm sure the rings meant a great deal to your grandfather and was hoping to pass a bit of himself onto you so you may know him better.

Just because you receive the 32nd degree doesn't mean you are no longer a 14th degree Scottish Rite Mason. The Lodge of Perfection (4° - 14°) has a lot of good lessons in it and most are content with wearing this ring. Plus when you get to the 32nd degree you get a cap to wear during meetings so getting another ring would just be too pricey in my eyes (although you can get a ring in any kind of Masonic design). I don't wear a Scottish Rite ring personally, but I do wear a pewter ring with various right angled carvings on it inlaid with a Square and Compass (no "G") on its top.

reply to post by hotel1
 

The York Rite confers degrees and orders, but we do not use the numbering system as the Scottish Rite does. The 14th degree the OP was talking about (with the 1st ring) is the last degree in the Lodge of Perfection (as practiced in the Southern jurisdiction).


I have seen information that states that the degrees are transferable across the two separate rites but of course the reliability of this information by its nature is questionable.

You see some similarities between the degrees and orders of these two rites, but being a member of one doesn't equate to being a member of the other. You'd still have to be properly initiated as the rituals do differ and there are some striking differences.

reply to post by Infi8nity
 

In addition to what NetworkDude said on the Scottish Rite, the York Rite a candidate goes through each degree and is usually a passive participant with a member acting as his voice (obviously the candidate doesn't know the words since he's not a member). In the Scottish Rite, the candidates may be involved a bit, but most of the time they are sitting watching a drama being played out for their instruction. Usually one only goes through maybe 7-degrees while the rest are communicated to him verbally (which usually occurs while the next degree stage is being prepared).

Once you're a Master Mason you can become 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason in one weekend. The York Rite is actually composed of 3-different bodies (a confederacy you can call it here in America
) and the amount of time to confer these degrees can vary. Many bodies hold a York Rite festival where one day they confer the Royal Arch degrees, a second day for the Cryptic degrees, and a third day for the Chivalric orders. Between each day is at least a few weeks since there can be a lot of memorization for the members to know before they can confer.
edit on 19-2-2013 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 

LOL...yeah, usually the burden lies with the member to purchase such things. My Lodge bought me an apron and lapel pin since I served as Master of the Lodge.

The inscription is probably "Virtus Junxit Mors Non Seperabit" which means "What Virtue Has Joined Together Death Shall Not Separate".



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by network dude

Originally posted by Infi8nity

Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by hotel1
 

The York Rite has individual degrees that must be worked, while the Scottish Rite is a series of plays that you watch and receive the 4-32nd degree during the reunion. (Again, in my jurisdiction)



Could you give some real time examples of this? I am having trouble understanding what you mean by individual degree's and a series of play's. Are you saying that in the York Rite you earn degree's step by step while in Scottish rite you learn a multitude of teaching witch can progress you from a 3rd degree to a 7th degree?


Is their a time period in to earn degree's? Could you progress to a 32nd degree in a year?
edit on 19-2-2013 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)


In the SR Southern Jurisdiction, you go to what's called a reunion. You must first be a 3rd degree master mason in good standing. Then you go to what is usually a weekend class. You watch a series of plays that teach lessons in morality and masonic history. There is a minimum you must see in order to finish the class, but it can be a little as 5 plays (degrees) an maximum of 29. The 29 plays usually takes about 4 days to do everything and is not done very often. So you go from being a 3rd degree master mason to being a 32nd degree SR mason in a weekend. That's why we keep trying to tell everyone that the degrees don't mean all that much as far as rank.

I am on a few degree teams and we dress up in costumes and practice our parts just like any other theatrical production would do. It's a lot of fun and fellowship.

Please ask any questions you may have. I will answer anything I can.


Thats interesting, I should read more about subject. I thought it was a series of teaching over looked by a higher ranking member (or position). For example you learn a topic and apply it to your own life once its applied correctly to your own life you can move on to the next teaching.
After watching these plays are you tested in any way? Are the play's as clear as day or is their allot of symbolism and metaphors? Is their a certain order in witch the play's are viewed? For example maybe you see a play that teaches you the symbolic meaning first so that you are able to pick apart other play's. These play's have to be in popular Hollywood movies, is their any movies you know of that pertain to a certain play? Can I see these play's online? Can see them in person with out becoming a mason? You said that degree's do not mean that much when talking about rank. What is the purpose of degree's in the Scottish Rite? After you learn the play's you learn other lessons right? Such as Hermetic Teachings, what are the most popular teaching with in the Scottish Rite?





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