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North Korea threatens South with "final destruction" during UN meeting.

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by Res Ipsa
 


I really wish Russia and China would finally man up and deal with their old Cold War Nuclear armed left over bastard child that they helped create in the first place.

The West's support for South Korea has paid off handsomely for both the citizens of the South with a much higher standard of living over their Northern Counter parts as well as economically for South Koreans and all foreign investors.

.




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:25 PM
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I think if any missile or weapon was fired into North Korea we would all see something that we weren't expecting. As much as their tech is not state of the art, I have no doubt they would lob missiles into South Korea.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by DarknStormy
 
Your are so right , for some fail to remember the treaty between DPRK and China , China is putting up er on a real good poker face for the world to see www.cfr.org... I do not think things have changed with them after ills death, Un still needs ok from China, at least that's how i see it

China is North Korea's most important ally; biggest trading partner; and main source of food, arms, and fuel. China has helped sustain Kim Jong-Il's regime and opposed harsh international economic sanctions in the hope of avoiding regime collapse and an uncontrolled influx of refugees across its eight-hundred-mile border with North Korea. After Pyongyang tested a nuclear weapon in October 2006, experts say that China has reconsidered the nature of its alliance to include both pressure and inducements. North Korea's second nuclear test in May 2009 further complicated its relationship with China, which has played a central role in the Six Party Talks, the multilateral framework aimed at denuclearizing North Korea.
From what i have gathered, DPRK still has backing from China, for if China was to put it foot down DPRK would not have made a new nuke test, nor be making the words of war.

edit on 19-2-2013 by bekod because: line edit



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by DarknStormy
I think if any missile or weapon was fired into North Korea we would all see something that we weren't expecting. As much as their tech is not state of the art, I have no doubt they would lob missiles into South Korea.


If North Korea was attacked they could make Seoul go away without recourse to missiles.

"Of the estimated 10,000 or so artillery pieces in the North Korean inventory, a considerable number are pre-deployed, in range of Seoul; additional artillery could be moved forward to fortified firing positions at short notice. Of particular concern to Seoul are Pyongyang’s 240mm multiple rocket launchers (capable of simultaneously firing 16–18 rockets), its 152mm and 170mm towed and self-propelled artillery pieces, and its mobile FROG systems – all of which are capable of delivering chemical and biological agents as well as conventional high-explosives"

North Korea could be destroyed but even without thier nukes could tear the heart out of South Korea. Thats why thier nonsense is tolerated. There isn't anything that can be done unless you want thousands of South Korean civilians to die.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 06:54 PM
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I have a radical idea. Why doesn't the United States actually listen to the grievances of the North Koreans instead of constantly conducting military exercises in an attempt to provoke them, starving their people through sanctions in an attempt at regime change, and calling their leaders crazy.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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Two thread on the same topic?

I wrote in the other one that I thought his son was supposed to be more moderate and open to the West.
Has this has changed or have we been lied to again?



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by Adaluncatif
 
poke poke poke the hornets nest, to see if reacts , if no action er swarming, then you know there is no real threat , but smack it with a bat, you get swarmed. The US is poking the nest, EU UN might hit it with a bat.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



The West's support for South Korea has paid off handsomely for both the citizens of the South with a much higher standard of living over their Northern Counter parts as well as economically for South Koreans and all foreign investors.


I completely agree and that's one of the things that bothers me around the World.

Not only with the example of South Korea, but also with the case of post-WWII Germany, it has been proven that help and financial support produce much greater and better results - both economic and social - than any of this sanctions and confrontation BS.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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Personally i dont think sanctions work. Heres why

i think it stimulates the countries desire to develop weapons that put their country on the map and helps them to defend themselves that wish it harm by placing sanctions.

The korean war has not ended its just treatied.

Aggression against NK has been threatened many times over the years. Even a few times where nukes were mentioned.

Yes they will use their weapons what hungry cornered rat wouldnt?

If you were one of the brainwashed in NK who would you hate the man fighting to provide food for you or the man that taketh away?

Until sanctions are lifted and other steps are taken the world should be very afraid of waking to a nuclear detonation.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 03:16 AM
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the Norks arent kidding when they say they can turn Seoul into a sea of fire, which is why ROK is moving its capital

the hermit state has a bite to match its bark, only China can rehab its little brother.

FYI a unified Korea would regard Japan as its arch enemy.



posted on Feb, 22 2013 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by southseasavage
 
er no ROK is not moving the capital online.wsj.com...


ASIA NEWS
November 30, 2009

South Korea's Capital City Won't Move
President's Decision to Leave Government in Seoul Prompts Sharp Criticism From Both Liberal and Conservative Politicians

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By EVAN RAMSTAD

SEOUL -- South Korean President Lee Myung-bak's decision not to split the national government by moving a portion from Seoul to a new city in the middle of the country is facing a backlash from lawmakers in both liberal and conservative parties.
and this www.bbc.co.uk...

2 July 2012 Last updated at 05:45 ET
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South Korea opens 'mini capital' in Sejong City
File photo: Sejong City, south of Seoul South Korea's Sejong City is located 120km (75 miles) from Seoul
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South Korea has inaugurated a "mini capital" designed to act as a new government hub south of the main capital, Seoul.

Sejong City, 120km (75 miles) from Seoul, was to become the new capital, but a high court ruled this to be illegal.

Moving some government offices there is a way of spreading economic benefits and easing congestion, proponents say.

But critics argue that the move will only result in inefficiency.

The initial proposal to make Sejong City South Korea's new capital was made in 2002, but the Constitutional Court rejected this in 2004.

At least 36 government agencies and offices are scheduled to transfer to Sejong City by 2015. Thousands of civil servants are expected to make the move there over the next few years.

But key offices like the president's office, and the defence and foreign ministries, are to remain in Seoul.

Aside from the economic benefits, Sejong City is also seen as a good security move because it is further away from the border with North Korea.

"There are worries that the division of central government bodies can cause inefficiency," Prime Minister Kim Hwang-Sik was quoted by Agence France-Presse news agency as saying.

"We will try hard to quell such concerns and to forge a good balance and co-ordination among the agencies."

One government official interviewed by the BBC's Lucy Williamson, however, complained that the relocation would mean a two-hour drive back to Seoul for meetings.
As the article states, the key offices like the president's office, and the defence and foreign ministries, are to remain in Seoul.





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