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Meet the Nayarit...

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by Kantzveldt
reply to post by chiefsmom
 




Maybe, they're thought to be funerary biers, though it's hard to understand the strapping down unless they were afraid of zombies...





They probably strapped them down so the bodies didnt slip as they carried them to resting place etc
edit on 19-2-2013 by WormwoodSquirm because: (no reason given)


They may also have been traversing steep terrain mountainous areas while carrying the bodies as opposed to flat land.
edit on 19-2-2013 by WormwoodSquirm because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 05:37 AM
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reply to post by Ramcheck
 



It's what they put their creative energies into...


Common subjects of shaft tomb tradition ceramics are:


Ceramic tableaus showing several or even several dozen people engaged in various seemingly typical activities. Concentrated in highland Nayarit and adjoining Jalisco, these tableaus present rich ethnographic insight into funerary practices, the Mesoamerican ballgame, architecture (most importantly perishable architecture), and perhaps even religious thought during the late Formative period



en.wikipedia.org...




reply to post by WormwoodSquirm
 




Yes that's what i figured, nothing worse than the body rolling off during the funerary procession...[




reply to post by Saltron
 



Mezcaltitlan is interesting as its seen by some as associate with the Aztec Aztlan, the place were they first settled in Mexico, in the Nayarit region. That's when the traditions seen here end, with the arrival of tribes such as the Aztec around 900 AD.
edit on 20-2-2013 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


Fascinating and delightful.

Thanks. S&F&



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 11:26 AM
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*Wow* Those sculptures are incredible. You generally don't see buildings represented in sculpture - especially every day structures like village buildings. Very unique.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 01:31 PM
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This image to me; looks like what they probably did with tribal law violators or captured enemies.

The head is encapsulated to keep the upper body from raising, and the arm straps to keep the arms from failing. The multiple marks on the lower body; lacerations to allow the dogs an easier meal for the conscious being consumed by them.

Sounds pretty brutal...but many ancient cultures were known to make human sacrifice, as a "food for the god(s)" to various tutelary deities, in various fashions.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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The hand-on-the-head means one thing, and it aint pretty -


It symbolizes external control.

The MRI machine? The straps can be figured out, if not totally explained. Clearly the person being strapped down was not meant to move, but was capable of such movement (hence the reatraints). Why? Dunno. Probably he could hurt someone, himself or another. Sleep walking prevention? Zombie apocalypse prophylactic? Maybe.

Nice post though.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by MarsSentinel
The hand-on-the-head means one thing, and it aint pretty -


It symbolizes external control.

The MRI machine? The straps can be figured out, if not totally explained. Clearly the person being strapped down was not meant to move, but was capable of such movement (hence the reatraints). Why? Dunno. Probably he could hurt someone, himself or another. Sleep walking prevention? Zombie apocalypse prophylactic? Maybe.

Nice post though.


Woops, the post above mine popped before I hit "send". Yeah, his analysis seems likely. Brutal. But, worse than Gitmo or Au Ghraib? You be the judge.



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 04:50 PM
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wow! thanks for this. extremely stunning models/sculptures.
great post.



posted on Feb, 21 2013 @ 10:14 AM
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This is a very interesting post.

I also found the "extended sleep" pic interesting. The straps were what drew me to it, but in further observation, I'm leaning towards perhaps, this as being an observational opportunity, post morteum.

Notice, there also seems to be a headdress as well.

Still, fastenating! S & F.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 

Can you tell your source for the image of the recreated Teuchitlan ceremonial diorama?





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