Fossilized Spines and Vertebrae of Big Creatures in Curiosity Sol 109!

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posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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This is why its not a far reach for 1 to assume there ARE skeletons ect on the surface, those don't even have to be the related to EA*RTH interest... Those can be animals that didn't get to retreat-hide-vaulted? I think the more interesting finds are inside. To add if fossil fuels are from species of the past here, apply to other planets MOONS and what materials-fuels propellants could exist?




posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Just a quick off-side off-topic question if you may.

Why do you always spell Earth as " EA*RTH"???

What's that supposed to signify?



Sorry for the off-topic, it won't happen again -- but that question has been bugging me for some time now.
edit on 3/2/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
Yes ArMap, no Caves have been shared located but we both know they are on MARS surfaces, either as raised entrances into the bases of some mountain or hill Crater wall or Hole type openings

No, I don't know that, they may exist or not.

Why do you say you know they exist?


The rover would have mini rovers that could access entrances/holes then the mini rovers would send out a Doppler radar sonar signal/wave in some form could even be a audio wave to make image once inside cave or hole. Listen devices would tell some things also like if you placed a listening monitor inside an EA*RTH cave full of bats ect. The main rover sits outside entrance gathers intel sends back here..

That's what I was thinking, a "central command" rover with an "explorer" rover. It's possible, but I didn't say it wasn't.



see above post

I forgot about radar.


I don't know if the thinner atmosphere is good enough for a sonar-like system.


I think its possible ArMap, its just if done the information may be too severe to release.

It's possible, of that I'm sure, I just think it's too complicated and error prone, that's why I think it's more likely that we see a manned mission first, as those are much more versatile.

As for what they could find it's only speculation.


Can you imagine if PAINTINGS WERE FOUND INSIDE not to mention artifacts that would appear to be not natural formed.

A sonar or radar base system wouldn't see those.



It seems the only thing stopping these expeditions if not already in play would be capital.

And complexity, when compared with what could be gathered from such a mission.


1 feels the entire planet should be assessed before manned missions, like a planetary drone scan and when complete the drones return back to cosmic base as to not pollute the surface.

I don't think that would be a good method, as it would waste a huge amount of time.


Only time shall tell my friend but yes there ARE CAVES and HOLE entrances.

I have never seen any cave entrance, but I have seen those holes in the ground, but I don't think entering those holes would be easy.


Again if EA*RTH had to duck-hide many not cosmic bound would dig into its surface in these DUMBS, now imagine an EA*RTH expedition and no one was here for some reason and the dumbs were found can you see the information that would share if accessed and preserved..

Sorry, I don't understand the above sentence.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by Chamberf=6
reply to post by Ophiuchus 13
 


Just a quick off-side off-topic question if you may.

Why do you always spell Earth as " EA*RTH"???

What's that supposed to signify?



Sorry for the off-topic, it won't happen again -- but that question has been bugging me for some time now.
edit on 3/2/2013 by Chamberf=6 because: (no reason given)


Its out of Respect for LORD ENKI or EA who came here on a STAR* (what ever you consider them.

*(*)* to be) So I spell EA*RTH in that fashion here on this interwebs connections, Chamberf=6


NAMASTE*******
edit on 3/2/13 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 2 2013 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 




Namaste*******



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 02:35 AM
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There is a lot of wind and sand erosion on Mars. I doubt that a fossil could remain intact on the ground for many years before a human probe could come and film it.



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 07:58 AM
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Compelling images indicating Mars surface harbors traces of complex life forms. Thanks for sharing, Arke.

smilodon



posted on Mar, 4 2013 @ 11:12 AM
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Originally posted by Pauligirl

Originally posted by Pauligirl

I had emailed Alan Boyle who writes the Cosmic Log for NBCnews.com about this but never heard back. I've now sent an email to:
Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

If I get anything back, I'll post it.


Got an answer, but it seems to be a standard form letter




As for life on Mars, Curiosity does not carry experiments to detect active processes that would signify present-day biological metabolism, nor does it have the ability to image microorganisms or their fossil equivalents.





Thanks Pauli...I imagine NASA would have to modify that statement if they snapped a pic of ET giving the rover the finger
Camera's apparently don't count as equipment capable of detecting life?

That said...extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof, and whatever this pic is "eroded rocks" or "fossilized vertabrae" the Pic alone will never be "proof". I would have liked more informed opinions though and am dissapointed we didn't get them. A field geologist with some exposure to spacerocks, meteorites, NASA etc. who could explain erosion and rock materials on mars...or Paleoanthropolist well experienced with fossilized skeletal remains of uncommon beasts. I would have liked to see strong arguments, rather than quick opinions.



posted on Mar, 5 2013 @ 06:49 AM
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Well done, it certainly looks like you are on to something.



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


Because we actually know quite a lot about Mars. Arguably, we know more about Mars than our own Oceans.

I'm just copy pasting their thoughts with a few of my own.
edit on 6-3-2013 by Gorman91 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


Originally posted by Arken
But this NASA statement is Amazing!

Amazing? Why?


Why a dozen of billions for this missions? Detect sand? False cololors of Mars? Out of focus photos? CGI video of Mars? Only entertainment.....

Oh, you have been talking about Curiosity all this time and you didn't even know what the mission was supposed to be? Didn't you had any "curiosity" about it?



Maybe a better name for the NASA Rover: STUPIDITY!

No, the rover is doing what it was supposed to do, no stupidity in that.
NASA is not responsible for what other people think, specially people that are ignorant of NASA's missions and expect NASA to do whatever they dream about.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


I would not be so hard on our friend here, he has certainly attained enough content and respect in his threads, not to be subjected to that kind or rhetoric. He is frustrated, like many of us, that a mission like this will not do more analysis in areas where it seems obvious that science may come out of it.

This mission DOES have the discovery of life as one of it's key goals. NASA really said it themselves in the mission overview:


Curiosity carries the most advanced payload of scientific gear ever used on Mars’ surface, a payload more than 10 times as massive as those of earlier Mars rovers. Its assignment: Investigate whether conditions have been favorable for microbial life and for preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life.


Here the operative words are "preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life". That means that if there is a "clue", you check it out. There are no doubt, clues here that should be checked out. And, there IS an instrument on this rover that can determine if material is organic. It is called the "ChemCam":



An instrument named ChemCam uses laser pulses to vaporize thin layers of material from Martian rocks or soil targets up to 7 meters (23 feet) away. It includes both a spectrometer to identify the types of atoms excited by the beam, and a telescope to capture detailed images of the area illuminated by the beam. The laser and telescope sit on the rover’s mast and share with the Mast Camera the role of informing researchers’ choices about which objects in the area make the best targets for approaching to examine with other instruments


We use spectrometers on Earth to determine if a material is organic. Find organic, then find life.



Organic matter (or organic material, natural organic matter, NOM) is matter composed of organic compounds that has come from the remains of once-living organisms such as plants and animals and their waste products in the environment.


Even if the majority of science experiments that this package can operate on are geology centric, it does have the underlying mission of finding life , or evidence that it exists. I , and I am sure that a lot of others, would like to see that "ChemCam" used to zap a piece of that suspected bone fragment, just for the science of it.

Source:
NASA Curiosity Media Fact Sheet

edit on 7-3-2013 by charlyv because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 07:29 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.


Originally posted by charlyv
I would not be so hard on our friend here, he has certainly attained enough content and respect in his threads, not to be subjected to that kind or rhetoric.

That was a result of all his attacks on the mission when, in fact, he (apparently) didn't know what the mission was about. The content and respect he may have earned from other people is irrelevant to me, I respect him as I respect any other ATS member.
(OK, maybe a little more than some other members, as I know him for some time
)


He is frustrated, like many of us, that a mission like this will not do more analysis in areas where it seems obvious that science may come out of it.

Obvious only to some people, that's the problem. Also, many people are frustrated because they had a wrong idea about what the mission was about.


This mission DOES have the discovery of life as one of it's key goals. NASA really said it themselves in the mission overview:

I don't see that as "discovery of life"


Here the operative words are "preserving clues in the rocks about possible past life".

Which is not the same thing as "discovery of life".


That means that if there is a "clue", you check it out.

If.


There are no doubt, clues here that should be checked out.

There are doubts that those are clues.


And, there IS an instrument on this rover that can determine if material is organic. It is called the "ChemCam":



An instrument named ChemCam uses laser pulses to vaporize thin layers of material from Martian rocks or soil targets up to 7 meters (23 feet) away. It includes both a spectrometer to identify the types of atoms excited by the beam, and a telescope to capture detailed images of the area illuminated by the beam. The laser and telescope sit on the rover’s mast and share with the Mast Camera the role of informing researchers’ choices about which objects in the area make the best targets for approaching to examine with other instruments


We use spectrometers on Earth to determine if a material is organic. Find organic, then find life.
We may use them to determine if a material is organic, but is Curiosity's spectrometer capable of that?


Even if the majority of science experiments that this package can operate on are geology centric, it does have the underlying mission of finding life , or evidence that it exists.

Isn't it evidence that it existed? Do they have equipment to find existing life?


I , and I am sure that a lot of others, would like to see that "ChemCam" used to zap a piece of that suspected bone fragment, just for the science of it.

Then I suggest you get some kind of "leverage" on someone at NASA or JPL, as I don't expect them to follow everybody's ideas of how they should run their mission.




As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:03 AM
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At the risk of resurrecting this dead(?) thread, I will say this.

There is a lot of wind and sand erosion on Mars. I doubt that a fossil could remain intact on the ground for many years before a human probe could come and film it.
Yes, this is what we are led to believe, however there are plenty of still-rough rocks out there with very sharp edges and very strangely 'weathered' shapes. I wonder if the wind and the particles carried by the wind can account for all the shapes?

There has already been given a lot of time arguing that there is very little pressure and that the wind blows for millions of years without any appreciable 'weathering', yet in other places we have small rocks eroded so that they stand on pillars left by the 'wind'. My favourite argument is about 5mm blueberries which would not take much to blow around. However, these are not collected into piles in the lee of rocks by the wind. I cannot work this out.

Perhaps it is time to start asking yourself some tough questions?

and also say this
There are many strange and wonderful images being released from Mars but the quality of these images for a multi-million dollar project is just laughable. What I would like to see is an image from Curiosity where I can zoom in so that the image becomes a pixellated (yes, real pixels, not compression artifacts) picture. That would be refreshing and show that they were not afraid to show us the 'real-deal'. Anyone who knows where these images are, please post a link.



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by qmantoo
 

what if they were left behind after a catastrophe and not as a result of slow erosion?



posted on Jul, 8 2013 @ 07:16 AM
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If Mars hasn't had water for over 3 billion years then those "fossils" are extraordinarily well preserved on the surface.

It's not even really fair to compare fossilisation on Mars to Earth as to my knowledge- no one has ever found a fossil of a complex lifeform ( as suggested by the OP) older than 1 billion years old on earth so we have no reference point.

I suspect the additional 2 billion years of environmental pressures on Mars would not leave intact fossils that we would recognise.



posted on Jul, 10 2013 @ 09:11 AM
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I cannot believe this thread is still going when it is based on such a poor topic (lacking any evidence, but awash in assumptions and imagination) for the forum Space Exploration.

Not even skunk Works, but this is in Space Exploration!?!?

Good f-ing grief.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 06:08 AM
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This is a conspiracy forum site so however much you may like to believe that the science forum is above all that, there are still some conspiracies concerning space exploration. Maybe if SOME of these conspiracies were taken seriously instead of the continual sarcasm we all may learn a few things. What has the last post contributed to this thread which is about possible fossilised spines?



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 06:12 AM
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Originally posted by qmantoo
What has the last post contributed to this thread which is about possible fossilised spines?


No, this thread is about rocks on Mars.... that some people claim look like a spine!



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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reply to post by Arken
 


Sorry, but all I'm seeing are rocks tinted green to make them stand out from all the other rocks on the surface, which then makes them appear to be something more than they are.



posted on Jul, 12 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Chamberf=6
 


Thanks for your HUGE contribution!!!






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