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Microbial Metallurgy Meet the bacterium that pulls gold ions out of solution and forms tiny nuggets

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posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:23 AM
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www.the-scientist.com.../articleNo/34274/title/Microbial-Metallurgy/



Researchers have found that a bacterial species stimulates the formation of gold particles in its environment as a way to survive in solutions containing toxic gold ions. The bacterium, Delftia acidovarans, secretes a compound dubbed delftibactin that precipitates gold ions, causing them to clump into nuggets. Canadian researchers, who published their work in Nature Chemical Biology this week (February 3), grew the bacteria in the presence of gold ions and found that gold nanoparticles began accumulating in the solution. They also identified the genes responsible for producing delftibactin and shuttling it outside of the bacterial cells. Frank Reith, an environmental microbiologist at the University of Adelaide in Australia who was not involved in the study, told Nature that the discovery could in the future help clean up toxic gold mine waste water, while recovering more gold from the slurry. “The idea could be to use a bacterium or metabolite to seed these waste-drop piles, leave them standing for years, and see if bigger particles form,” he said.


I am constantly being surprised by the power of bacteria and viruses. So does this dawn a new age in humanity? a new age where man has a new undertanding of its long term enemy. And we can see, that evolution is war. But we are facing our demons head on. Back tackling the unethical.

I present to you gold producing bacteria. The wonders of the universe. My god.




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 


Well thats interesting along with the documentary I saw on the fragmentation of the crust North To South in California where Quarts/ Gold leaches up to the surface .
Maybe old JP Morgans bunch can get them to make up that 99 tons of gold that they owe Veneseula . They seem to have lost it . That seems to be the case with the NYFederal Reserve and the German gold too.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:35 AM
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reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 

We could not survive without bacteria but this particular topic has been discussed several times.
edit on 2/19/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 

We could not survive without bacteria but this particular topic has been discussed several times.
edit on 2/19/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


yes it has
and a quick search around shows that this is a new bacteria Delftia acidovarans, Those other articals kinda trail off in another direction as far as i can tell.
edit on 19-2-2013 by CrypticSouthpaw because: (no reason given)


www.epcmworld.com...

this was feb 10th 2013. I thought it was interesting the quote about them trying to get the method of gold and water extraction down. My friend was talking about this that the ocean has lots of gold ions just we can't synthesize it properly because its toxic. But i think this might have something to do with his theory about extracting gold from the ocean. Very interesting.



A group of scientists at McMaster University in Hamilton, On have discovered that Delftia acidovorans can turn toxic water-soluble gold into microscopic nuggets of the solid precious metal. Using biochemical and genome analysis, Nathan Magarvey, a co-author of the study by McMaster’s Michael G. Degroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research (IIDR), discovered a set of genes and a chemical metabolite that were responsible for helping the bacteria create microscopic gold nuggets. The process is part of a defense mechanism that protects the miniscule bacteria from poisonous water-soluble gold. Or, as Magarvey and co. succinctly pointed out in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, “This finding is the first demonstration that a secreted metabolite can protect against toxic gold and cause gold biomineralization,” being the process by which living organisms produce minerals. But what does the discovery mean? For starters, it solves the long-running mystery of why the bacterium is often found on the surface of tiny gold nuggets. More importantly, however, is the IIDR team’s isolation of delftibactin, the molecule that pulls the gold out of the solution. If scientists are able to isolate enough of the molecule, it could play a role in drawing larger amounts of gold out of water. Frank Reith, a microbiologist at the University of Adelaide in Australia, points out that the MacMaster study complemented his team’s work on gold-processing bacteria. Reith noted that the finding opens up the possibility of a bacterium or metabolite that can be used with waste-rock piles to potentially draw out bigger gold particles. But don’t get too excited. Like the rare earth phytomining project that looks to use plants to draw the minerals out of waste-rock, doing the research is just the first tiny step in the gargantuan process of scaling up a potential mining technique like this. Of course that didn’t stop Magarvey from snapping up the intellectual property rights for delfibactin.
edit on 19-2-2013 by CrypticSouthpaw because: (no reason given)





Well thats interesting along with the documentary I saw on the fragmentation of the crust North To South in California where Quarts/ Gold leaches up to the surface . Maybe old JP Morgans bunch can get them to make up that 99 tons of gold that they owe Veneseula . They seem to have lost it . That seems to be the case with the NYFederal Reserve and the German gold too.


Yeah i see you picked up on the idea too.
edit on 19-2-2013 by CrypticSouthpaw because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:53 AM
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reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 


that this is a new bacteria Delftia acidovarans

I'm not sure what you mean by "new" but it's been around for a while and its ability to precipitate gold has been known as well.
news.discovery.com...

What is "new" is figuring out how they do it.

It is also the same bacterium discussed in the other threads. We have more efficient methods of doing what they do but they aren't any more practical (not very).
edit on 2/19/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:56 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


i knew you would say that. i just meant its not in the search generator. I should of been more specific. But thanks for the link!

Im gunna look around at the other links. If i highjacked this sorry!
edit on 19-2-2013 by CrypticSouthpaw because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:05 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

i don't know why that was hard to find. But its mentioned right here! il post the recent canadian studies in that thread. its 17 days old and the info i posted here is more recent and up to date.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 

From your OP

Canadian researchers, who published their work in Nature Chemical Biology this week (February 3)


From the other thread

This scenario may sound like a biochemist’s version of a fairy tale, but it’s real and scientists at McMaster University have just described how the process works in a recent article published online in the journal Nature Chemical Biology.


It's the same study.

edit on 2/19/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:20 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


you learn something new everyday



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 

Yes,my husband works on a goldmine,they call this the Biox plant.I dont know if they use this specific bacterial strain,propably not if its a new more effective one.But the plant cannot be without power for long periods,the bacteria in the biox tanks will apparently die,and according to the hubby,that would be catastrophic to production. He says this method of extraction is extremely costly to start from scratch,so the foremost imperative is to keep the biox tanks "alive" and functional at all times.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by CrypticSouthpaw
 

Hopefully.
It's a good thing to strive for.






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