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The Guardian like The BBC Defend the 1982 Syrian Muslim Brotherhood The First Islamic Uprising

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posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:33 AM
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Yahya Hawwa, voice of the Syrian revolution



The Guardian Defends FSA and the Uprising.
Seventeen members of his family have been arrested, but Yahya Hawwa still sings – and Syrian protesters have made his voice their own. Omar Shahid talks to the irrepressible voice of a revolution




Yahya Hawwa was five when his father and uncle were killed in front of him in Hama, Syria, in 1982. This was the era of Bashar al-Assad's father, Hafez, whose forces are believed to have massacred 20,000–40,000 Syrian citizens. The memory left an indelible scar on Hawwa – now 36 and dubbed the "singer of the Syrian revolution".


Noticed how the writer he is trying to defend the Syrian Revolution, by suggesting that this singer Yahya Hawwa who still sings has his family moved to the democratically country of Saudi Arabia.




He and his mother fled from Syria to Saudi Arabia after his father was murdered. His father and uncle were market traders, selling fruit and vegetables; their crime was that they had a brother who was a leader in the opposition Muslim Brotherhood, and an outspoken critic of the Syrian regime. "Whenever the Muslim Brotherhood did something against the government, the government would target 10 to 20 members of a family. My father and uncle were in a mosque near their home," Hawwa says.


He and his mother fled from Syria to Saudi Arabia after his father was murdered. His father and uncle were market traders, selling fruit and vegetables; their crime was that they had a brother who was a leader in the opposition Muslim Brotherhood, and an outspoken critic of the Syrian regime.

Ah yes i am quite sure that Yahya Hawwa would like to tell us what kind of freedoms his mother is enjoying in Saudi Arabia? and get this part according to this fled Syrian who fled to the democratically country of Saudi Arabia. He claims the following.

"The regime is devilish and tyrannical," he says. "They have no legitimacy: 70% to 80% of the people don't support them." When does he expect it to end? "I'm sure before 15 March, which will be exactly two years since [the revolution] started. That is when I'll finally be able to return home. It's a coincidence: that's my birthday, too."




"They have no legitimacy: 70% to 80% of the people don't support them." When does he expect it to end?


Really?? 70% to 80% of the people don't support Assad?? where are all the minorities in this Second Uprising by the Muslim Brotherhood? where are all the minority brigades?


And if you noticed the comment section with the users by EagleSyrian1 and LouLarry they are quick to come defend there Syrian Muslim Brotherhood by getting suspiciously high recommendation. As you would see in there profiles.




posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 03:24 AM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


The Guardian and pretty much the whole of the British media sing the praises of the FSA.

They British media has been bought and paid for.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 03:51 AM
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reply to post by ollncasino
 


Pretty much, and the same way BBC defended how the FSA used a Power as Bomber they strapped at least TNT Charges all over his while the BBC reporter was filming it.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


Yahya Hawwa, voice of the Salafists and Wahabists the Saudies not Syria !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
edit on 18-2-2013 by maes2 because: (no reason given)





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