Russian Meteor released about 33 times the energy of the Hiroshima atomic bomb

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posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:01 AM
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Russian Meteor released about 33 times the energy of the Hiroshima atomic bomb


www.smh.com.au

A meteor that exploded in the sky above Russia's Ural Mountains was the largest since the Tunguska blast in Siberia in 1908 and released about 33 times the energy of the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.

Before hitting the Earth's atmosphere on Friday, the object was about 17 metres in size and had a mass of about 10,000 tonnes, NASA said. Russian scientists offered vastly different statistics, saying the meteor weighed about 10 tonnes.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:01 AM
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It is interesting to note the meteor was "half the size of a foot ball field" and was reported to weigh 10 tonnes.

I am just glad that it burst out before it landed on soil, we may have had a disastrous event.

Perhaps one might wonder why this just appeared out of the blue without any official reports of this meteor.




www.smh.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 




It is interesting to note the meteor was "half the size of a foot ball field" and was reported to weigh 10 tonnes.

A 34 meter football field seems a bit short.


Perhaps one might wonder why this just appeared out of the blue without any official reports of this meteor.
Not really. Small, fast, and coming from the direction of the Sun. Very difficult to see.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by InnerPeace2012
Perhaps one might wonder why this just appeared out of the blue without any official reports of this meteor.

Because it was a small (even if dense) and fast one and they're harder to detect than bigger and/or slower objects.
It's "unusual" trajectory may also to be taken in consideration.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 




It is interesting to note the meteor was "half the size of a foot ball field" and was reported to weigh 10 tonnes.

A 34 meter football field seems a bit short.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Does an energy released about 33 times the energy of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, more interesting than the size, do you think?

It just seems to me there was a lot of energy release, and what difference it made on contact, if it hadn't already burst?
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: for clarity



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 

Not sure what you mean by interesting but:

E=0.5*m*v^2

In this case both the m and the v (in particular) were reasonably large.
Energy released is proportional to the square of the velocity. It had a lot of velocity.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:15 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 




It is interesting to note the meteor was "half the size of a foot ball field" and was reported to weigh 10 tonnes.

A 34 meter football field seems a bit short.


Perhaps one might wonder why this just appeared out of the blue without any official reports of this meteor.
Not really. Small, fast, and coming from the direction of the Sun. Very difficult to see.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


That user is in Australia so i believe he is referring to what you know as soccer in America.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by WP4YT
 

Soccer fields are 34 meters long?



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


reply to post by WP4YT
 



I'm from PNG, I had 100m for our average rugby field in mind.
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: darn spelling



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:24 AM
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"Half the size of a football field" in the article is refering to the Asteroid.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:36 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 

Not sure what you mean by interesting but:

E=0.5*m*v^2

In this case both the m and the v (in particular) were reasonably large.
Energy released is proportional to the square of the velocity. It had a lot of velocity.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I was rather concerned about the impact if it hadn't burst and contacted the ground? What damage/casualties ensued if had landed in city itself?

It just happened to burst prior to landing. That is like, near death, for those in its vicinity.



edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by InnerPeace2012
released about 33 times the energy of the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.



The difference being altitude.
"Little Boy" exploded at a height of only 600 metres.
The Russian thing was (depending on who you ask) about 20 - 25 kilometers high.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 


It just happened to burst prior to landing.
It didn't "just happen" to burst.
The physics involved pretty much guaranteed that it would.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:38 AM
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released about 33 times the energy of the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.


So.. basically Russia should be, statically speaking, wreaking in massive deaths & devistation??

33x MORE than Hiro .. if this is even remotely true.......where's the MSM on the devistation?? or is Russia not able to get any info out to the public due to .. 33x MORE devistation than Hiro.. ?

basically.. the more questions one asks about this ... the more questions are produced.. unless we can get CLEAR grind location of where exactly this 'air-burst' happend..



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:39 AM
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reply to post by Komodo
 




So.. basically Russia should be, statically speaking, wreaking in massive deaths & devistation??
No. But a lot of broken glass.
The energy was released 15 miles above the surface.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:49 AM
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plus, 33 times more devastating does not mean that it would devastate 33 times the surface of hiroshima. and the more far from the explosion center, the less damage you get... And if I remember correctly what I learned in high school, "intensity" of the shockwave should lower exponnentially with distance from the center.
edit on 18/2/2013 by Ghostfreak1 because: "mental typo"... wrote "fuku" instead of "hiro"...



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by Komodo
 


According to the news report, it had exploded some miles (perhaps 15 miles from Phages), and if the "intensity" of the sonic wave had declined, the effects on contact with nearby infrastructure damage had been reported to be a mere *few* millions US dollars as result.

All in all it seems apparent, despite it's massive energy release, it's real effects on casualties is what matters, statistically speaking.

Since, it barely caused any significant loss of lives, I bet it is a none event then, but was interesting to have known the effects of a meteor of that magnitude and of course the lack of warning from authorities, from what may have been a potential threat for citizens in the vicinity.

Peace
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)
edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 02:39 AM
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reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 

You seem to imply that the authorities were lax in some way. Do you think it was known that the meteor was going to arrive?



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 03:13 AM
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...

my head hurts too much to bother.

yikes...


edit on 18-2-2013 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 03:27 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by InnerPeace2012
 

You seem to imply that the authorities were lax in some way. Do you think it was known that the meteor was going to arrive?


No and that is my point of it.

All I am saying is that, if it is not picked up by the authorities, for the mere fact of it's size and or the angle to which the next one approaches, you can be rest assured that a warning from the authorities will only come *after* the event as done it's damage.

What other classic example other than that in Russia.

Peace

edit on 18-2-2013 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)





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