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the METEORS ARE REAL!! i just saw 2 miami fl

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posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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Well I don't know if there is a increase in meteor activity or not but I know that my hubby and I both saw a meteor Superbowl night. We went to my MIL's and went outside to smoke I was looking at something under the awning we were under and my hubby said ...... look .....look .....LOOK...... OMG LOOOOOOK!! LOL

so I did look and saw as a meteor was just passing by! This is in Metairie LA which is just outside New Orleans, we watched as it disintegrated and it was gone! It was really cool, and really bright we usually don't see things like that here!

I think we are in a dirty part of space right now. This is the first time we have ever seen anything like that here! If we were in Alabama I would expect to see that kinda thing, but too much light pollution here!




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by Ghostfreak1
 

Yeah. There's a reason the Grand Teton mountains are called that.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by billdadobbie
 

How did you judge the altitude? Meteors aren't usually visible when they get below about 50,000 feet.

At some point, usually between 15 to 20 km (9-12 miles or 48,000-63,000 feet) altitude, the meteoroid remnants will decelerate to the point that the ablation process stops, and visible light is no longer generated. This occurs at a speed of about 2-4 km/sec (4500-9000 mph).
www.amsmeteors.org...

It would be an extraordinary one to be visible below 10,000 feet.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


it was a clear summers evening 6pm i believe iron red. hills around are3000 plus feet i was no more than 5miles away as the crow flies from it .



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:09 PM
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ya ya, I know video is from Dutch.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by billdadobbie
 

So you had no way of judging the altitude. I'm not trying to be rude, it's just a fact.
You really had no way to judge the distance or altitude of it.


edit on 2/17/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Okay, thanks for the info, I'm quite bad at geography and with landmarks / famous places names.
Still funny anyway



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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Whom said the meteors were not real?

You won't see a meteor the size of the one that hit Russia in our life time...
So what you saw could have been some shooting stars (meteor)..and not an asteroid.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by antmax21
 




You won't see a meteor the size of the one that hit Russia in our life time...

While the odds may be in your favor with that statement. It's a bit rash.
There could be another, any where on Earth, tomorrow. But you won't find me betting on it.
edit on 2/17/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:32 PM
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We have been having some very unusual wind gusts in Kansas City, MO.
A few nights ago, one gust was so powerful that it was like my entire house was about to fall down!
I'm not sure if this has a connection with the recent meteorite connection going on but it is weird that these random powerful wind gusts here started when the Russian meteorite incident happened

Then again, it could just be an old house.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:34 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by antmax21
 




You won't see a meteor the size of the one that hit Russia in our life time...

While the odds may be in your favor with that statement. It's a bit rash.
There could be another, any where on Earth, tomorrow. But you won't find me betting on it.
edit on 2/17/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Fair enough. I prefer not to see one that size or larger ever impact earth..(well in our lifetime). Hopefully by then we can predict and avoid such objects.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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I saw one driving home late one night last year. Of course, Hollywood depictions are bogus. The meteor was stunning; a cascade of pure blue light that streamed apart as it fell. I'll never forget it.

I wouldn't necessarily be worried about them impacting on land. Water is more likely, and If the object in question is big enough the ensuing tidal wave would probably be more destructive.
edit on 18-2-2013 by Doomcake because: nada



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by ooYODAoo
 


Don't know if anyone has posted yet but here some evidence from Dutch - backed up by Radar!

Oh and the Military have a go and fire at incoming Meteor.




posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:27 AM
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edit on 18-2-2013 by ArchaicDesigns because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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This can only mean one thing...

...invasion.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:40 AM
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Fireball sightings are on the rise, and statistically so, for years. Just go to the AMS web site and check out the chronological history. On the other hand, we, as people, are like radio receivers. Once we get 'tuned' in to something, we tend to collectively see whatever that is much more frequently, when we would not notice it before.

The recent meteor incidents as of late have really tuned us in a great deal. However, if you do visit the AMS site, you will notice that there are usually 3 to 5 large fireball sightings a day, around the globe, that are witnessed by hundreds of people.

Cool event in FL. !!



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:49 AM
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Originally posted by quedup
reply to post by ooYODAoo
 


Don't know if anyone has posted yet but here some evidence from Dutch - backed up by Radar!

Oh and the Military have a go and fire at incoming Meteor.



Very interesting.... I would assume the Meteor would come up on IR



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by charlyv
 




Fireball sightings are on the rise, and statistically so, for years.

Fireball reports are on the rise.
The AMS has only been compiling them since 2005.
Reports are not the same as sightings.
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:02 AM
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Wonder if we will see something from Brixham next...



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by JrDavis
 

You never know, but that doesn't look like meteor activity. It looks like a strong ionization layer above the station giving a strong bounce, or an equipment issue.

The meteor radar detection system is also useful for predicting VHF tropospheric propagation. Look for a continuous trace. The continuous wave carrier is received directly during enhanced tropospheric and sporadic-E propagation conditions.

www.meteorscan.com...

Meteors don't look like that on the read out.

Here you can see what a typical meteor strike looks like. The trace starts high in frequency and rapidly drops to the radar carrier frequency as the meteor decelerates in the atmosphere, increasing in strength (ionisation) as it burns up. This creates this typical triangular shape you can see here.

www.meteorscan.com...


edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)





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