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I'm a felon, I've served my time...can I have my rights back please?

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posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 




In a truly free society, and in the America that I am from, there is no "bottom half" of our population. All men are created equal. None are more equal than others. We are all of equal worth, and there is no social class system.


That used to be true but you know very well its becoming reality. I didnt know this exist until i was defending my life in the courtroom.

Oh i just realized, you may have been commeting in the spirit of facetiousness.
edit on 18-2-2013 by onequestion because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 

I believe the answer to your question can be found within the brilliant words of George Carlin.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper

Originally posted by onequestion
reply to post by Creep Thumper
 


There is a clear social divide in this country and if your on the better half of it you can afford a lawyer.

If you behave yourself you don't need a lawyer.


But this is just not true. It is a nice theory, and it SHOULD be true. But it isn't.

Consider Cameron Todd Willingham His only wrong was....well, nothing. Too bad he isn't around to talk about this with us now.

Regardless, the majority of crimes are victimless crimes. Meaning that people get caught doing something they are told not to do, not because it is logical and reasonable, but just because there is a law against it.

If you accept money for sex, it is prostitution. If you do it on camera, however, it is pornography and is protected under the First Amendment.

The law is supposed to be reasonable, logical, and obvious. Instead we get a tangled web of special interest mixed with mob rule.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 



While it may not be the reality anymore, I refuse to accept it.

If more would make the same refusal, perhaps our nation would be free again.

If "behaving" is the litmus test, every person in America is just one law away from being a criminal. Every one of us does something that someone else would like to stifle. When will it be our turn to be the victim of law?



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


I've been on this planet for several decades. I'm doing just fine.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by Creep Thumper
 


I have as well, and am doing well myself. I am lucky that the things I enjoy doing are not made illegal, I guess. That way my lifestyle hasn't found itself on the wrong side of the law.

But its a damn shame that in a nation that touts itself as the "land of the free", we have to fear acting like free people.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Creep Thumper
 


I have as well, and am doing well myself. I am lucky that the things I enjoy doing are not made illegal, I guess. That way my lifestyle hasn't found itself on the wrong side of the law.

But its a damn shame that in a nation that touts itself as the "land of the free", we have to fear acting like free people.

Do you? I don't. What is it that you fear to do?



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 


I have 3 actually, so what? I ain't gonna rat them out, they are good guys.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Well at least you have a job !



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 08:51 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper

Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Creep Thumper
 


I have as well, and am doing well myself. I am lucky that the things I enjoy doing are not made illegal, I guess. That way my lifestyle hasn't found itself on the wrong side of the law.

But its a damn shame that in a nation that touts itself as the "land of the free", we have to fear acting like free people.

Do you? I don't. What is it that you fear to do?


Lets say that one day i feel like smoking a banned substance. It is not in my current interest...but what if i wanted to?

How about me just choosing to take my seatbelt off while i am driving?

I could run down a looooong list of local and state laws that forbid all manner of things. One of the most ludicrous: why will my gay son never know the legal benefits afforded a married couple?



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 09:04 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 09:16 PM
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Originally posted by Hefficide
reply to post by onequestion
 


I can agree with and empathize with what you are saying, with three caveats:

1) An across the board loss of rights for all felons doesn't make sense to me. Not all felonies are created equal. I once made the decision to have an employee charged for stealing from the job ( a compact disc ) - not knowing ( I'd just moved to Texas ) that the state of Texas considers all workplace theft to be embezzlement, thus a felony. In attempting to make a statement to my staff I, sadly, possibly ruined a young mans life. All over eight ninety-nine.

The loss of rights for any felony should reflect only the rights that the persons felony categorically fell into. IE commit armed robbery? Sorry... no more guns for you. Embezzle? In that case I can see a loss of the right to be taken solely at ones word.

2) For most felonies there should be some sort of time limit ( if there isn't already ) after which a felon could petition for reinstatement of his rights. If someone makes a stupid mistake in their late teens / early twenties? I see no reason why they shouldn't get some review or consideration come their thirties or forties. Assuming, that is, they keep their noses clean in the interim.

3) If there was a gun involved in your felony, sorry to say it, but I feel that you probably should not ever have the right to own a gun afterward. This isn't personal. I just feel that such stern restrictions might help to keep younger folks from repeating the mistakes of prior generations. I grew up with a lot of older role models, many of whom were severe drug addicts. While I did pick up a few of their bad habits, drugs ( in any form ) are not on the list. Just seeing the trouble, sickness, pain, and death in several cases - that drugs caused and that I witnessed? I was put off of the idea of trying them before I ever had the urge. Kids seeing older felons languishing for their rights might well have the same sort of negatively reinforcing effect.

~Heff


You have a point. It's amazing to me that you can be a non-citizen but stil a citizen, almost like a man with no country.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
Maybe it's just that the other half have behaved themselves.
Ummmmm..........NO...I can't for the life of me recall...ever...seeing an honest to goodness saint....You know who I mean, the guy that never does anything wrong...ever. Never driven over the speed limit, never rolled through a stop sign, never took a leak outdoors or played the music extra loud in his car................Like I said, they just havn't been caught...But hey...If your THAT GUY then I hear the Vatican is taking applications...


YouSir



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by Creep Thumper
reply to post by bigfatfurrytexan
 


Whatever.


Your dialogue is severely lacking.

Matter of fact, you may have taken the one line response to a whole new low.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


oq, I have mixed feelings about your dilemma my brother, but only cause everyones situation is just that, different.

Listen, I read what happened to you, and the same thing happened to me back in the late 90's as a younger man my friend. It changed me, and also cost me a lot of money, and most of all heartache.

Anyway, All I wanted to say about it is that never did I learn a bigger lesson in my life than I did from that experience. I wish you the best, and I hope that everything works out for you and those that you care about.

So many things can go wrong when you get a bunch of young men and young women together in a public drinking environment. It's not anyone's fault either, it's just natural Law. ~$heopleNation



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:52 PM
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reply to post by TheWetCoast
 


Tell me something, why the hell did you have to bring George into all of this? How dare you my foolish mortal friend!!!

Now......I have to ATTEMPT, let me repeat, ATTEMPT, to stop laughing my ass off while trying to be serious about a very serious subject!

LMAO! However, All I have to do is look at George, who is an absolute genius by the way, and the best comedian ever to step onto a stage in the history of the United States of America (in my opinion), and I just start laughing.

Now, I just want to return to the subject of discussion and it's a very good one I might add. ~$heopleNation



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Personally I've never understood why convicted felons, violent or otherwise, lose their right to vote upon being released from prison.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


How to seal your court Records... e how



Court proceedings are a matter of public record. However, the court has the power to seal court records. Some records are automatically deemed confidential such as doctor and patient correspondence, sessions with a licensed mental health professional, sexual assault victims and juvenile records. If information disclosed during a trial is harmful to the plaintiff or defendant, file a motion to seal the court record.



and

How to expunge your old Record... e how




An individual arrested or convicted of a crime such as petty theft may want a fresh start without the consequences which accompany a criminal record. Instead of lying or not informing employers or landlords about your old criminal record, you can expunge it. Expunging an old criminal record refers to the process of either deleting or sealing an arrest and/ or conviction record. Expunging your criminal record has many advantages. For instance, when a judge or magistrate grants an expungement, you won't need to disclose any information about the arrest or conviction to others such as potential employers, landlords or police officials.




Look into these.... you may have some time issues... research you states requirements and check with legal aid in person

google and bing are your friends



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


So you admit to being a violent criminal in your past and have now changed your ways....yet will remain a felon for life. Well I would say that maybe you shouldn't have been a violent criminal then and did the things you did.

If there is no major incentive to NOT commit crimes then we could all just do whatever we wanted then right? Being branded a "felon" for life and losing certain rights for life is a pretty damn good incentive to NOT commit a felony then don't you think?

I am sorry that you the OP feel the way you do, but maybe you can do something productive like tell your story to school kids or write a book and do public speakings about what you did and what the repercussions were to your actions and perhaps help people to NOT commit felonious crimes.

I do not feel sorry for the OP in any way whatsoever...we all make our choices in this life...and we all must deal with the consequences resulting from our actions whatever they may be.
edit on 18-2-2013 by AutOmatIc because: spelling



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