The Chelyabinsk "Meteorite"

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posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by JrDavis


So v * t = 345 m/s * 30 s = 10350 m...

10350 m = 23152.3MPH

23152.3 MPH = 6.4311 mps


I'm not really understanding your working here, i understand 345m/s is the speed of sound so 10350m is the distance away from the sonic boom that the guy is standing. but how does 10350m = 23152.3mph?


and what does the distance he is away have to do with that speed? serious question, I'm kinda stumped. the only speed thats related to that distance is the speed of sound, no?

edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: crappy spelling




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:15 PM
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Originally posted by connelly4245

Originally posted by JrDavis


So v * t = 345 m/s * 30 s = 10350 m...

10350 m = 23152.3MPH

23152.3 MPH = 6.4311 mps


I'm not really understanding your working here, i understand 345m/s is the speed of sound so 10350m is the distance away from the sonic boom that the guy is standing. but how does 10350m = 23152.3mph?


and what does the distance he is away have to do with that speed? serious question, I'm kinda stumped. the only speed thats related to that distance is the speed of sound, no?

edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: crappy spelling


I've worked it out now! lol. you've changed the distance of 10350m into a speed of 23152mph! thats not possible! you done it by: 10350 divided by 1650 (approx distance of a mile) multiplied by 60 (mins in an hour) multiplied by 60(seconds in a minute). that can only be done to change a velocity from m/s to mph. not magically change a distance into a velocity!

anyone with a basic concept of physics will tell you to find out the velocity of something you have to divide the distance travelled by the time taken, or v=d/t. you cant simply change a distance to a speed! lol very poor in my eyes

theres no chance something in earths atmosphere could travel that speed, the energy created would be tremendous due to the earths atmosphere! if we take your estimate of it being 50 km up and say it takes 30 seconds to hit the ground, that gives you

v= 50000/30 = 1667 m/s or 5997 kmh

being conservative if we double the hieght the meteorite came from to 100km (very conservative in my view, probably more like 20km) it still only gives us a speed of around 12000kmh (well short of your supposed 23000mph

sorry for the long post, im an engineer and hate nothing more than poor working
edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by vonclod
the sounds are from it exploding high up in the atmosphere not hitting the ground and then the fragments also exploding causing shock waves..sound travels at around 770mph..i think it varies slightly on temp and air pressure but the metoer is travelling way faster than the sound so you would see it a good time before you heard it
edit on 17-2-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)


This is the right answer.

Case closed.

Korg.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by connelly4245

Originally posted by connelly4245

Originally posted by JrDavis


So v * t = 345 m/s * 30 s = 10350 m...

10350 m = 23152.3MPH

23152.3 MPH = 6.4311 mps


I'm not really understanding your working here, i understand 345m/s is the speed of sound so 10350m is the distance away from the sonic boom that the guy is standing. but how does 10350m = 23152.3mph?


and what does the distance he is away have to do with that speed? serious question, I'm kinda stumped. the only speed thats related to that distance is the speed of sound, no?

edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: crappy spelling


I've worked it out now! lol. you've changed the distance of 10350m into a speed of 23152mph! thats not possible! you done it by: 10350 divided by 1650 (approx distance of a mile) multiplied by 60 (mins in an hour) multiplied by 60(seconds in a minute). that can only be done to change a velocity from m/s to mph. not magically change a distance into a velocity!

anyone with a basic concept of physics will tell you to find out the velocity of something you have to divide the distance travelled by the time taken, or v=d/t. you cant simply change a distance to a speed! lol very poor in my eyes

theres no chance something in earths atmosphere could travel that speed, the energy created would be tremendous due to the earths atmosphere! if we take your estimate of it being 50 km up and say it takes 30 seconds to hit the ground, that gives you

v= 50000/30 = 1667 m/s or 5997 kmh

being conservative if we double the hieght the meteorite came from to 100km (very conservative in my view, probably more like 20km) it still only gives us a speed of around 12000kmh (well short of your supposed 23000mph

sorry for the long post, im an engineer and hate nothing more than poor working
edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: (no reason given)
reminds me of the chalenger disaster,a rocket gone wrong. In my eyes there are 3 possibilities.1 freak co in si dense,2,the asteroid was going to hit anyway and they distracted us with da15...or 3 it was a rocket launch to intercept da14,4 ... it was the doomsday bomb going off.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Look at the video, that sonic boom took way too long to hit the ground. It was the first thing that bothered me after i saw it on the news. It was a meteor but its a bit odd.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by AlexIR
 




Look at the video, that sonic boom took way too long to hit the ground.

I've watched the video. A number of times.
I don't know how you can determine when the boom should have hit by viewing the video.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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Is the sound heard a sonic boom? Or the sound of the meteor exploding. If it is the sound of the explosion then the only calculation that can be done is the approximate distance of the explosion to the camera.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by Banater
 


exactly, which is why i cant understand the op's calculations!!



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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the answer has been provided for y'all
here is a good example of how you will see something thats a good distance away a good time before you hear it..maybee takes 12 seconds for the sound to travel, you can see the wave
this is the pepcon explosion

www.youtube.com...
edit on 17-2-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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The more that I think about it, the sound was a combination of the sonic boom and the explosion. The initial loud sound would be the sonic boom and the multiple exploding sounds right after would be the meteor breaking up. This would be consistent with meteor breaking up within a few seconds of hitting the atmosphere.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by vonclod
the answer has been provided for y'all
here is a good example of how you will see something thats a good distance away a good time before you hear it..maybee takes 12 seconds for the sound to travel, you can see the wave
this is the pepcon explosion

www.youtube.com...
edit on 17-2-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)


That is a good example of what we are talking about. The point is you can't calculate the velocity of the object from the video.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by Banater

Originally posted by vonclod
the answer has been provided for y'all
here is a good example of how you will see something thats a good distance away a good time before you hear it..maybee takes 12 seconds for the sound to travel, you can see the wave
this is the pepcon explosion

www.youtube.com...
edit on 17-2-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)


That is a good example of what we are talking about. The point is you can't calculate the velocity of the object from the video.

when i replied to this thread last night this incident was the first thing i thought of..i knew i would have to dig the vid as it really shows how slow sound travels

i think its been reported the meteor was traveling about 20km per second as it hit the atmosphere but would of definatly slowed down quite a bit..i would guess there may be a formula based on orig speed and the angle of trajectory
edit on 17-2-2013 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:31 PM
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Maybe it was north Koreas satellite coming down! ...since it came from space and all....And that's why they didn't find any meteorites in the pond because it was a satellite not a meteor. .....just kidding!



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by Banater
Is the sound heard a sonic boom? Or the sound of the meteor exploding. If it is the sound of the explosion then the only calculation that can be done is the approximate distance of the explosion to the camera.


That is the issue. Something traveling 33,000 mph should of already hit before the guy in the house had time to get a camera and record the event.

I did calculate the distance of the explosion to the guy recording it in his house with a camera.

It was .61 miles. Not even a full mile.

So why is he able to record for 10 seconds (Say it took him 30 seconds to find a camera.........ok) and then he hears the explosion?

33,000 mph and it takes that long to land .61 miles from the Camera?

Also if it broke up and started to lose speed it wouldn't make such a loud explosion due to the loss of mass.

I measured the distance by the echo created from the "Explosion"



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:35 AM
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Originally posted by connelly4245

Originally posted by connelly4245

Originally posted by JrDavis


So v * t = 345 m/s * 30 s = 10350 m...

10350 m = 23152.3MPH

23152.3 MPH = 6.4311 mps


I'm not really understanding your working here, i understand 345m/s is the speed of sound so 10350m is the distance away from the sonic boom that the guy is standing. but how does 10350m = 23152.3mph?


and what does the distance he is away have to do with that speed? serious question, I'm kinda stumped. the only speed thats related to that distance is the speed of sound, no?

edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: crappy spelling


I've worked it out now! lol. you've changed the distance of 10350m into a speed of 23152mph! thats not possible! you done it by: 10350 divided by 1650 (approx distance of a mile) multiplied by 60 (mins in an hour) multiplied by 60(seconds in a minute). that can only be done to change a velocity from m/s to mph. not magically change a distance into a velocity!

anyone with a basic concept of physics will tell you to find out the velocity of something you have to divide the distance travelled by the time taken, or v=d/t. you cant simply change a distance to a speed! lol very poor in my eyes

theres no chance something in earths atmosphere could travel that speed, the energy created would be tremendous due to the earths atmosphere! if we take your estimate of it being 50 km up and say it takes 30 seconds to hit the ground, that gives you

v= 50000/30 = 1667 m/s or 5997 kmh

being conservative if we double the hieght the meteorite came from to 100km (very conservative in my view, probably more like 20km) it still only gives us a speed of around 12000kmh (well short of your supposed 23000mph

sorry for the long post, im an engineer and hate nothing more than poor working
edit on 17-2-2013 by connelly4245 because: (no reason given)


No you are right.

Question.

Lets be conservative and say that this is at 41,000 feet above ground.

In the video it looks like it is much closer than 41,000 feet.

So 41,000 feet to meters 12496.8 m

12496.8 M / 345 m/s = 36 Seconds.

Explosion at 32 seconds..


I would say it took the guy > 30 seconds to grab a camera after he saw it wiz by.

What do you think?

This means that the sound should of already traveled down by that time.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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reply to post by JrDavis
 


I would say it took the guy > 30 seconds to grab a camera after he saw it wiz by.
Does it take you >30 seconds to get your cell phone out of your pocket?
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:46 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by JrDavis
 


I would say it took the guy > 30 seconds to grab a camera after he saw it wiz by.
Does it take you >30 seconds to get your cell phone out of your pocket?
edit on 2/18/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


The only variable that is left to debate is how long it took for someone to put a camera onto the clouds..

That is all that is left out.

However that's even if these clouds are 41,000 feet.

Lets say it is a camera phone on his cell. He was able to capture detail in the clouds more than the distant buildings.

So I would say that they are closer than 41,000 feet.

Which would bring the time down even more. You have 4 seconds to play with because it should of taken 36 seconds for that sound to travel if he was able to turn around and look up and record as it wized by.

If someone wants to explain how close those clouds are would help with the math more but 36 seconds leaves him 4 seconds to turn around and record.

I'm trying to get ahold of the people that took the footage to find out how long it took to get a camera onto the clouds.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:50 AM
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reply to post by JrDavis
 


Estimates put the explosion at 60-80K feet, it could have taken up to 75 seconds or so. Without a flash we can only guess how far he was from the blast.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:51 AM
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reply to post by JrDavis
 


So I would say that they are closer than 41,000 feet.

The meteor is estimated to have fragmented about 13 miles above the surface. That's a bit more than 41,000 feet.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 01:51 AM
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Here is another great video... Although the explosion happens sooner (Took longer time to get a cam)

It shows that the clouds were a lot lower than 41,000 feet.





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