Bright fireball seen over Bay Area skies. Reports from peninsula, Fairfield, and Santa Clara.

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posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:07 AM
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Originally posted by mardukiscoming
reply to post by goou111
 


Nothing to be afraid of.Probably.
DA14 almost certainly had a debris field trailing it.Maybe.

The next few hours might be interesting.


But the Russian one was totally unrelated to the DA14 Phage said it came from another dirrection completely.




posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 

Please.
I had no way of determining that. Russian astronomers did.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:15 AM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee

Originally posted by mardukiscoming
reply to post by goou111
 


Nothing to be afraid of.Probably.
DA14 almost certainly had a debris field trailing it.Maybe.

The next few hours might be interesting.


But the Russian one was totally unrelated to the DA14 Phage said it came from another dirrection completely.


Not to disparage Phage but I am assuming he is reporting what astronomers are reporting. Here is NASA (I know many of you here don't believe a lick of what they say regardless of their expansive knowledge)


"The trajectory of the Russian meteorite was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, making it a completely unrelated object,"



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:17 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Char-Lee
 

Please.
I had no way of determining that. Russian astronomers did.


Yes well as I said...you said it in another thread I saw today..............................................


How about give me a star for a good memory?

edit on 16-2-2013 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 


The Russian meteorite was moving in the exact opposite of the asteroid. (How can the asteroid be on a parallel orbit with Earth and approach from the direction of the South Pole?)

The Russian meteorite WAS moving in the same direction as the one in California, though.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:19 AM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Char-Lee
 

Please.
I had no way of determining that. Russian astronomers did.


Yes well as I said...you said it in another thread I saw today..............................................


How about give me a star for a good memory?

edit on 16-2-2013 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)


Ill give you one



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:21 AM
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Hey, maybe this is an International missile ping-pong war-game going on...that thing we've heard so much about but never believed it could really happen.

Maybe these are ICBMs launched from space, being deflected by the opponents' missile defense systems?

What do you think these little political schoolboys have been up to lately?

Star Wars...the real thing?



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


The Russian meteorite WAS moving in the same direction as the one in California, though.

How do you know that? About either meteor?
We know the Russian meteor was coming from the general direction of the Sun but how do you know the direction from which the California one was coming?



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:24 AM
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www.youtube.com...

edit on 01/04/2009 by steve95988 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by steve95988
 


Honestly, that looks like a normal "shooting star" and not a fireball, given the video. Go out where the light pollution is minimal and I bet you see a few of those over a month. Okay, not normal, it does last a bit longer than a typical asteroid hitting our atmosphere but I have seen those when I lived in New Mexico and the Bay Area one looks nothing special except it comes on the heels of the Russian incident.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


abcnews.go.com...

In this blog a little ways down they quote someone at NASA as saying that the Russian meteorite was moving in a North to South trajectory.

For the California Meteor I used the witness testimony from the meteor site above. Witness says he was facing South and saw the meteor moving straight downwards. Since the event was witnessed by several people on a North-South line and they saw it going down in the South, does this not mean it was moving north to South? I guess I could be wrong there, but it seems that would be the case.

ETA: www.amsmeteors.org... < that site
edit on 16-2-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


On a side note it is interesting to read how people perceive an object's trajectory in the pitch of dark. Man we are subjective beings trying to explain an objective event only to place our subjective view upon it!

"Downwards" -- typically this means that the object was moving away from them on the horizon and its appearance can have that of a "downward" movement. Typically when we observe the world, we don't calculate the larger distances and figure in the curvature of the Earth. This object was so high in the sky that as it approached the edge of the horizon to a view it would naturally have a "downward" appearance.

I do love the speaking from authority comment though "I am a scientist"....so? You are a scientist on an anonymous website posting your subjective observation! Okay, I am done with my laugh.
edit on 16-2-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Well yeah. I would hope someone could tell if a fiery object was moving TOWARDS them at several thousand miles per hour.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:47 AM
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Originally posted by JayinAR
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Well yeah. I would hope someone could tell if a fiery object was moving TOWARDS them at several thousand miles per hour.




Just like you would hope people could tell if a 150 ton locomotive was moving TOWARDS them too....or airline pilots recognizing another aircraft moving TOWARDS them.

----------EDIT-------------
To clarify the above, those objects would have near zero apparent motion in relation to the view if they were moving towards them at a certain angle. That was the point of this; they are moving yet we perceive their movement differently because of their size in relation to the surroundings.

What we see and what we comprehend are completely two different things in these instances. Same here with this object.

ETA: People describing the object 100s of miles away in the opposite direction would have the appearance of the object moving rapidly "upward"; similar to airliner contrails that have a similar visual effect.
edit on 16-2-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)
edit on 16-2-2013 by ownbestenemy because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:50 AM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Yeah. As I stated, I could be wrong, but I don't think I am. Fairly confident that both the Russian and Californian meteors were moving North to South.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:53 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

Looking at the California reports it seems most reports are more northwest to southwest (the P1, P2 numbers). Some variation but some people have a lousy sense of direction.

But I think it's more important to think about the sunward aspect of it. We know the Russian meteor came from the direction of the Sun. At the time the California meteor was seen it was near the western horizon (by a lot of reports) but the Sun had set about two hours before. Meaning the Earth had rotated about 30º after sunset. California was 30º "around the corner". The more overhead and the higher from the horizon the farther from the direction of the Sun.

I suppose there is a possibility it too came from the general direction of the Sun but that 24 hour separation makes it hard to associate it with the Russian meteor. As I said earlier, you're talking about something like a million kilometers distance between them.
edit on 2/16/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I was just saying that they were moving in the same direction. General direction anyhow.

But yeah, out in space they wouldn't have been very close to one another.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:58 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


I am not doubting what you believe here and I am sorry if that is how I have come off.

The Russian incident we can make a fairly accurate estimate in the objects trajectory given we had good reference (time of day and the light source), giving us a generally North to South movement.

On the other hand, this object will have to be identified by compiling seen data from videos (landmarks) and testimony to determine direction.

Case and point: I can drive 100 miles in a westerly direction and at the 50 mile marker I could ask my wife what direction we are going and I will get two different answers. ****sorry honey*****



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 

That's a problem with thinking they might be a debris field.

A meteor shower can be considered a debris field. There's a reason they are given names like Geminids. It has to do with the direction in the sky that they come from. It doesn't seem like these two meteors really came from the same direction, from the same part of the sky.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Its all good, man. I follow ya. Haha.





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