Appalling quality of live coverage of Asteroid DA14 2012

page: 2
8
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:15 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:18 PM
link   

Originally posted by TrueBrit
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Centred, HD quality professional tracking from the first glimpse to the last shot of this thing. I want to see the entire machinery of the worlds space industry doing its level best to offer us the BEST veiw of this object.


I am sure by tomorrow or the next couple of days we will have a compiled time-lapsed video, but for now we have telescopes tracking it so it isn't a tiny speck of light but rather a slightly larger dot of light. But I have to ask, what do you think the "best" view is? We should be seeing the surface of it? Its rotation?

I am thinking you are not understanding how small the field of view is on telescopes trained on this object are.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:19 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 
fitting avatar phage,how long we got left? 15 or 20 mins perhaps



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:31 PM
link   
I agree, I thought the MSM news stories could have been a little better too...

Some one initially came forward and said Military missiles had intercepted a meteor, then that was retracted, to say the military wasn't involved at all....

If stars wars is really happening (which it is), you can rest assured it wasn't just a "Meteorite"

Fire FromThe Sky - The Battle Of Harvest Moon

Created from the thoughts of Hatonn, Dr. Peter Beter, and Calvin Burgin.

ATS: Reference - www.abovetopsecret.com...

Decent description -




This book, by Calvin Burgin contains a lot of material that came through Dr. Peter Beter (what a name!) from Hatonn, including the Jonestown Story I posted yesterday.

This is absolutely fascinating. This is about 160 pages long, and please copy and place it on your computer to read it. Share it around, it is an extremely important story. I have read most of it, still have some yet to go.

The first half is the book, Fire From the Sky, the second half is a bunch of other stories, many in the Phoenix Journals from Hatonn through Dr. Beter, who was busy before the Ekkers started their work.

Once you read this you will understand why Russia is what it is today. She is still far more powerful than the US military, Nato and Israel.


Star Wars - It has Begun - Slayer

Navy Space Command Uncovered - Zorgon



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:35 PM
link   
reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


I am aware of the limitations of top level gear, but there hasnt been any coverage by anything of that sort yet. No professional observeratory has deemed this thing worthy of even moving thier telescopes around to look at it!

Australia had one of the first computer controlled telescopes, and yet the best they can muster is a Primary school teacher and her chum, sitting in his backyard on lawn chairs under an eye piece! What the hell is going on here?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:45 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


I agree.

I do not agree with the statements I've read saying NASA does not have money in the budget.

thats ridiculous. look at those numbers.

so there is nothing high powered to point at this asteroid to show the people?

is that not their goal, to educated the public using the public's funds?

not to mention this is going below the geostatic satellites and just below 20k miles

from the earth..

what a waste.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:46 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:48 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 



I am aware of the limitations of top level gear, but there hasnt been any coverage by anything of that sort yet. No professional observeratory has deemed this thing worthy of even moving thier telescopes around to look at it!


Correct; it is a piece of space rubble of absolutely no scientific interest. In any event, there are no major observatories well sited to observe the closest approach live. Amateur astronomers now have equipment well in advance of even the best research facilities thirty years ago.

As for your complaint about the frame rate, if you had paid attention, you would notice that the asteroid appeared elongated. This is because it is so faint that it was necessary to take longer exposures with the CCD than the normal commercial broadcast rate. All things considered it was a marvelous technical achievement.

You're welcome.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by TrueBrit
reply to post by Phage
 


Well its less of a dot on this video, and more of a smear as often as not, because the broadcast quality is crap. Lets say you were the sort of person who wanted to watch a speck of light travel across a star field. Wouldnt you want it to be displayed in a decent format and frame rate?

Lets say this was ANYTHING you gave a crap about? Wouldnt you want the best of the POSSIBLE tech and tracking.


I'd probably not be relying on amateur astronomers and part time astronomers to be getting my data from.

If I were that desperate to get the clearest vision, I'd invest in it myself.


Gingin Observatory was opened as a public observatory in October 2001 and has always been operated as a private business, co-located with the Gravity Discovery Centre, an hour drive north of Perth. The founding Astronomer was Mr David Nicolson.

The business is now operated by Bella Wunderlin (aka "Quasar") and Hans Wunderlin (aka "Hans Solo")! On the 3rd of Febuary 2012 , the opportunity to buy Gingin Observatory came up . We are following the foot steps of those who previously owned the Observatory who has taught us so much about this great business and with a love of astronomy in their back pockets, they took this special chance to take on a new business with lots of potential.


*shakes fist at nasa*



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:17 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:18 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:20 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:21 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:24 PM
link   
What exactly were people expecting to see?

DA14 is a tiny rock thousands of miles away - a tiny pinprick in a good telescope.

It's not like we have a dozen camera teams orbiting it to bring live close up 3D HD images!
edit on 15-2-2013 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:28 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Why?

Seriously. Why?

It's a tiny rock - one of many that pass close to Earth every year. Only visible from Earth as a tiny pinprock of light.

Watching it pass by would make watching paint dry seem incredibly exciting.
edit on 15-2-2013 by AndyMayhew because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:32 PM
link   
Enough with the posts about each other.

Stick to the topic or post bans are next.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:45 PM
link   
reply to post by AndyMayhew
 


I have passed many an hour, watching paint dry. However, knowing that one is looking upon an object from the guts of space, where no man has ever trod, nor, at this rate, is ever likely to, is actually quite a thing to witness. I remember when I gazed upon the first meteor shower I ever saw. I wept, I laughed. It was as much a spiritual expirience as a scientifically interesting one.

My concern is that this event, which should fill people with wonder, is being recorded and broadcast in the lowest possible quality, almost as if to say " Inspiration is irrelevant", and that cannot be allowed. Inspiration is the only reason people choose to take up the task of investigation and learning that comprises an interest in astronomy, and the space industry and the communities which support it, should be PROMOTING inspiration, not crushing it.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:55 PM
link   
I understanding your underlying intentions and wants but I just think you are desiring something that cannot be accomplished yet (inspiration is born out of that desire no?) Think of the accomplishment though....someone identified an object in space only 150ft in length; we calculated and correctly modeled its trajectory, we tracked it and streamed it to the world via millions and millions of computers. The average person with a half-way decent telescope could have tracked it if they were in an advantageous location. We then, in no time like ever before, share our thoughts and ideas in near instantaneous manner on the subject thus further fueling that inspiration and desire to learn more.

Yep, it was appalling alright. We just had live video showing an object 150ft in length at a distance of 17,000 miles away going about 28,000 miles/hour. This isn't inspiring?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:18 PM
link   
Perhaps the poor video is hiding something Nasa doesn't want us to see!



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:18 PM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 



My concern is that this event, which should fill people with wonder, is being recorded and broadcast in the lowest possible quality,


Under the circumstances, this was broadcast in the highest possible quality. Ten years ago you would not have been able to watch this live unless you traveled to the Indian Ocean with your own equipment!





new topics

top topics



 
8
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join