Homeowners fend off bailiffs, aided by POLICE! WOW

page: 2
75
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join
+18 more 
posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:08 AM
link   
[SIZE=4]A CHALLENGE FOR SKEPTICOVERLORD![/SIZE]


Originally posted by SkepticOverlord
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Wonderful.

Another person in debt looking to shirk his responsibilities.

More in a response to this video in this post in another thread.

Why is financial irresponsibility being applauded?


And a snippet of what you posted in the other thread:




No, but there is shared blame in so far as the housing crisis/bubble. Way too many people leveraged themselves to artificially high home valuations with ridiculously high payments with no regard to reality or the future. Sure there were some scams and a goodly amount of unethical mortgage brokers and investment banks... but hordes of otherwise intelligent people got stupid also.


I challenge you to read the thread that I wrote back in 2010 and then come back and back up this statement.

Predatory Lending is THE cause for the Systemic Mortgage Foreclosures

[SIZE=4]The blame for this whole mess is most certainly caused by the banks. [/SIZE]
edit on 15-2-2013 by Julie Washington because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:10 AM
link   
reply to post by JBanger
 


That's terrible to be held in fear of all those things. An accident could happen anytime. Millions all under the same thumb.
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:13 AM
link   
reply to post by PsykoOps
 


How come we couldn't serve that same justice on the banks when they are bankrupt? Wake up son...



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:20 AM
link   
too bad it wasnt nighttime, coulda said it was an intruder and shot em. oooops



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:21 AM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


The lending was a lucrative trap, the banks too were irresponsible, let alone responsible for fails in the ecconomy that causes people finacial difficulty, so they should accept some of the responsibility when repossessions occure during recessions.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:23 AM
link   
reply to post by dirtybird
 


Tut tut, we try to do things within the law....oops.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:36 AM
link   

Originally posted by Julie Washington
Predatory Lending is THE cause for the Systemic Mortgage Foreclosures
[SIZE=4]The blame for this whole mess is most certainly caused by the banks. [/SIZE]

We have somewhat of a more clear picture of the mess than we did in 2010 -- and I certainly don't deny that a good portion of the blame is squarely on the financial megaconglomerates... along with government sponsored changes that allowed for the commoditization of home mortgages.

-- however --

Such financial shenanigans (yeah, I just used that word) are not possible without a market that embraces it.

It makes no financial sense for someone to obtain a "no money down" mortgage where the payments represent half of their monthly income. Yet by some reports, a majority of the subprime defaults came from exactly this type of loan.

Underwriters lied on mortgage applications, and many reports indicate a very good percentage of applicants knew about and supported the fabrications. Here, a vast majority of subprime defaults came from improperly documented or fraudulently documented loans.

Appraisal firms were getting kickbacks from all kinds of sources (real estate firms, title companies, underwriters, and mortgage bankers) to keep pushing the valuations up for more profitable loan prices. These are people who should never have done any such thing.

Those are three well-discussed issues that have come up after lots of forensic accounting on the mess that put a portion of fault in the consumer's direction. I've always contended that it's an 80/20 issue (20% being consumers), but that the 80% representing the bankers may not have been so large if the 20% were not so willing to be absolutely stupid.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:40 AM
link   

The video was back in May 2012, and due to the major embarrassment we caused the court, they came back for a 2nd eviction some time later, which again we attended. Unfortunately, this time they brought the heavies; High Court Enforcement Officers, who are unabashed fascists. The Police were ordered to stand down, and Sgt Mo, had been ordered not to attend. The bailiffs used excessive violence to secure entry. But however, due to the video evidence, we have the grounds to prosecute and sue them for their tyrannical actions. The Bird family's struggle against the bank continues, as we prepare for the next round of action against the bank. The only time you truly lose your home is when you GIVE UP.


High court enforcement officers ordered police to stand down, and allow the banks to take control of the property so they could push it through the system again, and the next unsuspecting person can take the same risks. It's a win,win for the banks, and they are allowed to be irresponceable, because we will Be "forced" to bail them out, but if we put one step out of line, no matter the circumstances, they can take your property? I'm not even an owner, but I have a problem with this.
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:49 AM
link   
reply to post by SkepticOverlord
 


Thanks for your response. A sigh of relief because I was getting the impression that you felt most of the fault layed at the consumer's feet.




I've always contended that it's an 80/20 issue (20% being consumers), but that the 80% representing the bankers may not have been so large if the 20% were not so willing to be absolutely stupid.



It is that 80% that brought our national economy to it's knees.

edit on 15-2-2013 by Julie Washington because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:56 AM
link   

Originally posted by Julie Washington
It is that 80% that brought our national economy to it's knees.



Well...

Lots of smart people have also said the housing crisis could have been more readily absorbed (but not without some pain) if not for the country financing on credit an unnecessary war in Iraq.



Just to say, it's more of a tangled mess than just one thing.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 12:04 PM
link   
reply to post by HelenConway
 


even worse in NYC. cops put a boot on my car because i was parked in a 15 min parking zone for 17 minutes. for some reason it costs 375$ to get it removed, if you dont pay it in 24 hours your car gets towed and the price goes from 375 to $600+



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 12:18 PM
link   
reply to post by MastaShake
 


It's about the same in the uk. And you get charged by the day for storage of your vehicle too.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 12:25 PM
link   
reply to post by SkepticOverlord
 


Is this thread being kept of the new topics page? It generated quite a bit of response early on, and I thought i might see it on one of the hose reels but its not comming up in latest replies or flags.

Just asking as i get the feeling some think this pertains to OPPT. It does not.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:16 PM
link   
Silence is golden, and could be considered as an answer.....



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:23 PM
link   
It would be interesting to see High Court vs Briggs Family .

As far as I can tell , the beneficiary has committed no crime nor broken any Law* .
(Law as in LAW , not Statutes masquerading as one .)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:38 PM
link   
reply to post by 23432
 


Briggs as in the great train robbery? Or someone else?

I kind of see what happened in this vid as a win, maybe not the war, but that battle was a win, and another step in the right direction. Now people know how to nullify the bailiff, they can look more closely at the high court rulings that eventually over ruled the owners and the law. The awnser will proberly lie with human rights in the high court, and hopefully will win out over any corporation.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:45 PM
link   
Baillifs truly are disgusting SCUM. That guy has done NOTHING to them or their families or friends. Neither does he owe THEM a single penny, yet they treat him as if he has. They were arrogant and threatening and i believe that if they could have, they would have beaten him to with an inch of his life, if not worse. And for what ? for MONEY !!
It takes a certain type to be a baillif. They all believe they are 'tough guys' and most have a history of violence for one reason or another.
Not a single one of those assholes is doing what they are doing because they believe they are doing the right thing. Their paypacket is all that's important and they are only to pleased to commit violence on total strangers to get it.
Is there really any difference between a baillif and a hitman/mafia thug ? The only thing that's seems to be different is that the baillif can do what he does LEGALLY. But it's still committing violent acts on people for hard cash.
Being able to hire violent thugs to obtain debts by ANYONE should in itself be a criminal act. If banks, or anyone else for that matter lend to people who cannot pay back then it's tough. Either they should be more careful who they lend to or just get out of the lending business altogether if they can't suffer the bad debtors.Legalising violence is not the answer.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by SkepticOverlord
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Wonderful.

Another person in debt looking to shirk his responsibilities.

More in a response to this video in this post in another thread.

Why is financial irresponsibility being applauded?


If the Bank's weren't scamming people maybe he wouldn't have this attitude. What goes around come's around.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:17 PM
link   
reply to post by Wifibrains
 





I kind of see what happened in this vid as a win, maybe not the war, but that battle was a win, and another step in the right direction. Now people know how to nullify the bailiff,


This was my thinking as I was watching the stand off. Great education for those that are in the fight of their lives with bankers. The bank was not playing by the rules in this case, and certainly are not in many others......so for anyone to think these folks are dead beats, having little to no knowledge of the case at hand, are just as thuggish as the bailiffs on that scene.

With all the theft that banks and corporations commit.....and we all see it......when will we all start standing up for one another?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by DrunkYogi
[If the Bank's weren't scamming people maybe he wouldn't have this attitude. What goes around come's around.

RBS mortgages tended to be pretty straight forward -- which was identified in the video as the person's mortgage holder. He had quite a stack of overdue notices.

RBS got into trouble for going too deep into US mortgage-backed securities and paid a ton of fines.





 
75
<< 1    3  4  5 >>

log in

join