Dilute Concentrations of a Psychiatric Drug Alter Behavior of Fish from Natural Populations

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posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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Dilute Concentrations of a Psychiatric Drug Alter Behavior of Fish from Natural Populations


www.sciencemag.org

Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A variety of pharmaceuticals enter waterways by way of treated wastewater effluents and remain biochemically active in aquatic systems. Several ecotoxicological studies have been done, but generally, little is known about the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals. Here we show that a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) alters behavior and feeding rate of wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) at concentrations encountered in effluent-influenced surface waters. Individ
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.news.com.au
www.nytimes.com
online.wsj.com
www.eurekalert.org

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Fish Hurt by Drug Waste
edit on 2/16/2013 by semperfortis because: Copy the EXACT Headline




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:09 AM
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Now we have evidence that polluting our waters with drugs is not a good idea (surprisingly enough). It's appalling that people continue to pollute, pollute, pollute despite more and more evidence being available. Also, don't forget that this study only uses one single drug, which is a stark contrast to the whole bunch of different drugs that some rivers receive nowadays. It's not difficult to imagine that the situation would be much worse there.

Personally, I don't want to see fish getting hyper and aggressive after having their habitats polluted by drugs. It will have catastrophic ecological and evolutionary consequences, not to mention that a lot of kids will be scared. Also, while I think fishing itself is an evil, I don't want to see more and more fish attacking fisherman (not that they should fish in polluted waters, but some might if they're not provided with the necessary information).

By the way, judging by ATS's reaction after the quasi-cannibalistic acts in Florida, maybe someone will link this to a mutant fish apocalypse? (Just kidding around)

www.sciencemag.org
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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What is more appalling is that any form of waste is ever poured into the waterways, there is simply no need to do it. For example, human waste, instead of being poured into our waters treated or untreated, should be fueling our cars and heating our homes.

And series of green boxes, basically facilities with plants, putting any water through, purifies it 100%.

There is ZERO excuse for this not to be standard in all regions.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 10:26 AM
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I caught this on BBC's website, and what struck me was that these Anti-Anxiety drugs caused the fish to show anti-social behavior and act increasingly "bold" (another website used the term "aggressive").

Now, if these are the effects on fish, could certain humans be affected in a similar fashion, and could this have a link to the recent mass-shootings where the perpetrators were said to be taking psychiatric medicine?

I won't be going off on a rant about how over-medicated we are becoming as a society, especially for psychological conditions such as anxiety. (Seriously!?!)
But, I can't help but wonder how much of this "medical residue" finds its way back into drinking water, and what potential effects it may have on humans.

the Billmeister



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by Billmeister
 



...I can't help but wonder how much of this "medical residue" finds its way back into drinking water, and what potential effects it may have on humans.


The studies proving same resurface every few years or so, and are again forgotten. Fyi to the OP and others - much pharmaceutical contamination in water occurs because people pee out a whole helluva lot - the rest comes from agriculture (animal pee cuz they're way over-doped) and industry dumping. ...Not a lot of people dump their expensive feelgood meds down the toilet.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 11:43 AM
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there was a study re shrimp recently which showed the same
apparantly they were distainful of predators and would swim right out in front of the feeding storks

with their little shrimp fingers held high in the air
the storks boldly enjoyed their lunches
edit on 15-2-2013 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:45 PM
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Drugs msking living creatures anti social andd aggressive. And they needed a STUDY for this? -smh-



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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That's why I don't let my fish do drugs.
An oscar is aggressive enough when sober.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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New study finds that drugged fish are anti-social and aggressive!


Not to mention they then eat all the Twinkies and Doritos.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 06:33 AM
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reply to post by IamAbeliever
 


Brings new meaning to the phrase, "Stone Cooked Salmon." :-P



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 06:43 AM
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Those fish need to follow the rule
"DON'T DO DRUGS, STAY IN SCHOOL"

Thank you, I'm here all week.
Try the veal.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by diqiushiwojia
maybe someone will link this to a mutant fish apocalypse? (Just kidding around)


Just give it time. We've got those genetically engineered salmon who have been designed to eat non-stop and grow really big really fast. Once those escape into the wild, things should get interesting.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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Prescription drug residue in human waste can not be filtered out of the waste water.


"People take pills. Their bodies absorb some of the medication, but the rest of it passes through and is flushed down the toilet. The wastewater is treated before it is discharged into reservoirs, rivers or lakes. Then, some of the water is cleansed again at drinking water treatment plants and piped to consumers. But most treatments do not remove all drug residues."


www.cleanwateraction.org...


The conventional water treatment plants cannot remove prescription drugs in drinking water supply (See Figure 1). Disinfection with the used of Chlorine is one of the steps in treating raw water. However, chlorination makes most of the prescription drugs more hazardous and it can produce cancer inducing chemical compounds or carcinogens during the treatment procedure as illustrated on Figure 1.


www.iwawaterwiki.org...

so prescriptions drugs of all kinds never leave the water and everyday we are adding more to it increasing the levels.

I have a well so I hope my water is cleaner than the toxic soup of fluoride, chlorine, prescription drugs etc that people in large cities are drinking but it still concerns me that this stuff never leaves the water it is just recycled and added to, every day every month, year by year.
edit on 16-2-2013 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)





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