Sources of Cosmic Rays Bombarding Earth Located

page: 1
9

log in

join

posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:20 AM
link   
It was reported today in Boston, Ma. by The American Association for the Advancement of Science
that the long elusive and disputed sources of Cosmic Rays reaching Earth originate from the remnants of Two Supernovas in our own Galaxy. The sources are located in the Constellations Gemini and Aguila. The distance
from Earth to the point of origin is 5000 and 10,000 light years respectively.

These Rays are largely diffused by our atmosphere, yet some penetrate. To be clear, these rays
are not to be confused with the Alpha, Beta, and Gamma rays/particles produced by mankind.

This is one of the sources of "Naturally" occurring background radiation.

I thought some of you might find this interesting. Personally I always hypothesized that these rays
were generated by the central cluster of energy in the center of our galaxy.
Evidently I was wrong. I figure since it is not the first time, it will not be the last time either.

Link: aaas.confex.com...

aaas.confex.com...

Link to Article: www.guardian.co.uk...

www.csmonitor.com...
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: add goodie
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: Fix Link
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: Add Link
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: add content
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: typo
edit on 15-2-2013 by Wildmanimal because: typo




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 01:42 AM
link   
reply to post by Wildmanimal
 


Hello ATS, apologies for all the edits, I am an octopus with 7 arms at the moment.

Regardless, managing Cosmic Ray exposure is essential to space travel/exploration.

These rays can have a detrimental effect on Humans.

Best



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:22 AM
link   
Forgive me if I'm wrong, but isn't there a black hole at the center of our galaxy? What ray could escape that?

Supernovae, pulsars & quasars make the most sense. I wouldn't be surprised if the strongest rays are coming from supernovae that we don't know have happened yet (I don't prescribe to light being the fastest speed in the universe).

Great data. Thanks!



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by shefskitchen
Forgive me if I'm wrong, but isn't there a black hole at the center of our galaxy? What ray could escape that?
Once something goes inside the event horizon of the black hole, nothing escapes except maybe Hawking radiation.

But before matter enters the black hole, it's subject to extreme acceleration and this can release radiation. An inaccurate analogy would be to think of burping while eating...but they can be pretty violent burps where matter can be ejected at nearly the speed of light, and EM radiation also.

A huge "belch" of radiation from a supermassive black hole indicates that the cosmic monster recently devoured a star, scientists say.


"The mass of the star fell into the black hole, but along the way it heated up and produced a burst of energy in the form of a powerful jet of radiation, [which] we were able to detect through space-based observatories."



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:01 AM
link   
reply to post by shefskitchen
 


Well think of the rays from our sun, they reach all parts of our solar system and beyond. I could be wrong,
but I believe the general consensus is that distance from the center plays a role in ray absorption.
The further away from the "Black Hole" the greater the chance of escaping it.



posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 10:19 AM
link   
Interesting

Are there any other known sources of cosmic rays than supernovas



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 09:23 PM
link   
reply to post by tropic
 


Well,,, Photons, Alpha,Beta,and Gamma particles are produced by other sources than
"Cosmic" Rays. These sources are more localized. For instance, the earth, sun, and heavenly
bodies in our Solar System. Cosmic Rays originate beyond our "local" realm.
Therefore the term "Cosmic Rays".

Thanks for your reply.



posted on Mar, 1 2013 @ 09:44 PM
link   
In the comment section there's this little gem


Beezer

14 February 2013 8:08pm
44

My favourite part of this article is that there exists, somewhere on Planet Earth, a man named Professor Stefan Funk. Awesome.


Caught ya Beez!





top topics
 
9

log in

join