Meteorite Crashes in Russia

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posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:03 AM
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The lack of fragments, is fuelling conspiracy theories.

Given the track record of the area and lack of honesty from the government, it adds even more to conspiracy theories. It isn't a surprise that the locals neither trust nor believe their government and suspect there was military involvement.

From the videos, there is a lack of fragment contrails or even fragment projectiles after the 'explosion'.

It went from two uniform parallel contrails to one to nothing.

Most meteors that fragment in the atmosphere do so visibly, with obvious fragment contrails, in addition to fragments on the ground.

www.telegraph.co.uk...


Russian meteor: lack of fragments sparks conspiracy theories

The scarcity of evidence on the ground has fuelled scores of conspiracy theories over what caused the fireball and the huge shockwave that hit Chelyabinsk, which plays host to many defence industry plants. Nationalist leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky told reporters in Moscow it could have been "war-mongers" in the United States. "It's not meteors falling. It's a new weapon being tested by the Americans," he said. A priest from near the explosion site called it an act of God. Social media sites were flooded with speculation about what might have caused the explosion. "Honestly, I would be more inclined to believe that this was some military thing," said Oksana Trufanova, a local human rights activist.


www.telegraph.co.uk...


Formerly a production centre for weapons-grade plutonium, it now hosts a giant nuclear fuel reprocessing centre with a terrifying safety record. An estimated 3.6 million people live in the region whose capital is also called Chelyabinsk. The nuclear plant, which no longer manufactures plutonium, suffered at least three serious accidents in the Soviet era irradiating a huge swath of the region’s 33,900 square miles and an estimated half a million people. The Soviet authorities hushed up the accidents including a giant 1957 explosion whose effects scientists have likened to the fallout from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. Many of the area’s rivers and lakes remain choked with nuclear waste, and many of its inhabitants say they have contracted cancer and radiation-related sicknesses as a result of its appalling nuclear legacy. The authorities routinely dumped nuclear waste into its rivers and at least 10,000 people have had to be relocated for health reasons. A group of American scientists once claimed it was the most polluted place on earth.


www.dailymail.co.uk...


Is this the most polluted place on Earth? The Russian lake where an hour on the beach would kill you Lake Karachay was a dumping ground for one of the Soviet Union's biggest nuclear weapons facilities A string of accidents and disasters has left the surrounding regime completely contaminated with radioactive waste




The lake, in Russia's south-west Chelyabinsk region, close to the modern border with Kazakhstan, is located within the Mayak Production Association, one of the country's largest — and leakiest — nuclear facilities.
Built in the Forties as Soviets moved armament production east to avoid the Nazi invasion, Mayak was one of the Russia's most important nuclear weapons factories and was off limits to foreigners for 45 years.
It was only after President Boris Yeltsin signed a 1992 decree opening up the area that Western scientists were able to gain access - and promptly declared it the planet's most polluted area.

In their long decades of obscurity, the nuclear engineers at Mayak spent their time mainly having nuclear meltdowns and dumping radioactive waste into the river.
The watered-down waste was a cocktail of radioactive elements, including long-lived fission products such as Strontium-90 and Cesium-137–each with a half-life of approximately thirty years.
When their facility's existence was finally acknowledged, the Chelyabinsk region had seen a 21 per cent increase in cancer, a 25 per cent increase in birth defects, and a 41 per cent increase in leukaemia.

Irradiated: The ruins left by an explosion of nuclear waste storage tanks at the Mayak nuclear facility in 1957
The nearby Techa river, on which several villages relied for water, was so contaminated that up to 65 per cent of locals were stricken with radiation sickness.
Prevented from mentioning radiation in their diagnoses, doctors treating those who had fallen ill termed the sickness 'special disease'. Even then, these notes were classified until 1990.
The rural communities surrounding the nuclear facility suffered greatly from their government's nuclear arms race with the U.S.
Eager to catch up with the technological development of Western weapons, the Mayak engineers didn't worry too much about safety and the facility suffered several major accidents in the Fifties and Sixties.


edit on 17-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)
edit on 17-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by Phage


Nonsensical probability calculation. But I really don't think any Yale professor was involved anyway.



If this was the 1920's, I'd say a yale professor was a good solid stuff. But today, he's about as useful as ... hmmm, now let me see what sort of qualifications people have had to show off through Universities in the western world, for the past 3 decades.

1. It's prohibited to copy cat, yet everyone does it and magically get away with it. You're likely to get more critizism to return your own work, than if not.
2. Standard operating procedure, if you have a value in experiment that is considered "off", then you throw away the experiment and start again.
3. Standard values, use about 10-12 decimals accuracy, where there in reality is no such accuracy available.

Oh yes, and not to mention the standard Big Bang and Higg's particle ... or, the "religion" factor. The answer to life and everything ... it's almost comical.

No, sorry pal ... even if many of the observations made by amateurs are nonsensical, they're still just as valuable as the observation of that Yale professor.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 07:35 AM
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Just an observation, this russian meteor came in from the east, also according to www.telegraph.co.uk...

The Californian meteor came from the east "Scientists at the Chabot Space and Science Center, in Oakland, said it had received calls describing what appeared to be a fireball flying west, but it was not clear what the object was."

Can anyone find out what direction the Cuban meteor came from.

I'm just wondering if we should be pointing our telescopes to the eastern sky's to see what else is on the way.?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by paulmac
 


Interestingly, there is also a nuclear plant, albeit one that wasn't completed properly though had gained interest from Russia in the Cienfuegos Province of Cuba where the meteor exploded over.

www.havanatimes.org...


HAVANA TIMES — Homes in the central Cuban town of Rodas, Cienfuegos shook on Wednesday evening after an explosion overhead, reported ANSA news service. Witnesses reported the fall of a celestial phenomenon that ended with a huge explosion with a very bright light in the sky that shook their homes, said ANSA citing the Cuban morning TV news program as its source. Experts are scouring the area in search of any remains that fell to Earth. No reports of injuries or damage to property has come in.


en.wikipedia.org...


In December 2000 Russian President Vladimir Putin visited Cuba and offered to finish one reactor by investing 800 million dollars over the course of six years.[17] Castro subsequently announced that Cuba was no longer interested in completing the twin 440-megawatt reactor plant.[1] This announcement was made amid the failed attempt to resolve the problem of Cuba’s debt to the former Soviet Union, inherited by Russia.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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I would also be very interested in eyewitness reports of electrophonic sound PRIOR to the acoustic shock -- that is, during the brightest flaring of the fireball. This is a at-long-last well-established effect of plasma-generated radio noise coupling into near-observer physical objects and creating a hissing or whooshing sound. It occurs simo with the visual flares, seems to come from 'all around' [not from above], has been reported for centuries by some bright fireball witnesses and pooh-poohed by scientists until work by Colin Keay and others established its validity.  See www.gefsproject.org...



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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Here's where you go wrong. What you are calling "chemtrails" are contrails. Ice crystals which have condensed and frozen.


So, you don't believe that there is any such thing as chem trails. Why not just say that at the outset? To me there is abundant evidence that they do exist, although we cannot know what they consist of. They may have a variety of compositions, depending on the purpose. I think it's been established, even in the mainstream that this method has already been widely used for weather modification.

Take a look at this video:
youtu.be...

To me that can be nothing else but something deliberately being sprayed into the sky, in a deliberate pattern. If you think it's just the result of normal air traffic, then we will have to disagree.


Then most of what you read and watch is nonsense. You should try reading and watching something factual. There is no evidence that contrails have high concentrations of aluminum and barium.


I'm not talking about contrails -- I'm talking about chem trails, and sure there is. Watch the doc "What In the World Are They Spraying."


Do you know how hot a meteor is when it reaches the stratosphere?


No, I don't, which is why I am bringing the topic here for discussion. If you know, then please tell me. If it's impossible for a hot meteor to bring a cloud of aluminum particles to ignition temperature and initiate an explosion, please let me know why. That's what I'm here trying to find out.


No. We do not.

I'll revise that to say that I, not we, know that there is something being sprayed in the skies.
edit on 17-2-2013 by jrtallent because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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I see there isnt much science being discussed here anymore but just to add they will be returning in spring to search the lake and they did find fragments on the ice around the hole.




But the six divers who searched its waters for three hours on Saturday were able to finding nothing but mud and silt.
"They immediately discovered that the water's visibility was zero and that the bottom was covered with 1.5 metres (five feet) of sticky mud,'' a recovery team member told Russian media.


Read more: www.news.com.au...



With the conditions they describe it is no wonder they are having are hard time. I have dove in water at 40% visibility which is like swiming in a smoke screen. 0% is near imposible.
edit on 17-2-2013 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:07 PM
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I'd think it's nearly impossible to locate it visually. What about a metal detector? I'd think something like that would be the only way.




Originally posted by Grimpachi
I see there isnt much science being discussed here anymore but just to add they will be returning in spring to search the lake and they did find fragments on the ice around the hole.




But the six divers who searched its waters for three hours on Saturday were able to finding nothing but mud and silt.
"They immediately discovered that the water's visibility was zero and that the bottom was covered with 1.5 metres (five feet) of sticky mud,'' a recovery team member told Russian media.


Read more: www.news.com.au...



With the conditions they describe it is no wonder they are having are hard time. I have dove in water at 40% visibility which is like swiming in a smoke screen. 0% is near imposible.
edit on 17-2-2013 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by jrtallent
 


I would think that would have to be used. With 5 ft. of mud it would be a pretty big task still. The hole in no way shows the size the meteorite will be much smaller and in fragments on the bottom now. I was thinking that the use of a super magnet would be better. However Russia has sealed off the area for spring so their scientists can look at fragments first. The public can’t go looking for it there.

I do not know how deep it is but the deeper the more area you would have to search. I would doubt it being strait down.

Edit to add

Lake is 12 meters 36ft deep.
edit on 17-2-2013 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:39 PM
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For some reason the post i made earlier is being dismissed as lies, perhaps a link to the original will help you all with that!

Source
edit on 17-2-2013 by rigel4 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:42 PM
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An oblique view using 0.73 µm visible channel images from the Japanese MTSAT-2 satellite (below; click image to play animation) revealed that the stratospheric component of the meteor trail could be seen for as long as 9 hours with the aid of illumination from the sun




cimss.ssec.wisc.edu...

Meteor vapour trail animation, 15th Feb 2013



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by whyamIhere
 




I pointed out it was fairly obvious something coming at that angle did not make that hole.

What angle would that be?


First I will concede I don't know anything about this subject.

I was just trying to point out in the picture it looks like an Ice Fishing hole.

It seems in the video the object was not coming straight down.

Just seems like that inbound object could not make such a perfect hole.

Or maybe it could? I don't know.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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2 years ago I was hoping the San Blas Islands off the coast of Panama and Colombia and we got a pretty good show of meteors not as big as that but still pretty impressive. I am actually surprised we do not see it more often but considering the Earth is mostly covered by water the odds are it happens more often and we just don’t see it.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by Grimpachi
 


They then said the ice hole was from something else and NASA started to call the event a ''tiny asteroid'' that didn't hit earth, it exploded in the atmosphere, instead of a meteorite.

Seeing as there are vast areas of uninhabited forest in the area and radioactive areas, not sure how they are so sure about that.

Perhaps it was the lack of visual fragments and smaller contrails one would expect from an exploding meteorite as well as obvious ground fragments.
edit on 17-2-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by Grimpachi
BTW what is the proper term for the trails left behind?


A fireball this big and making it down so low in the atmosphere will leave at least a few different types of trail behind it. The most obvious one which looks like white clouds or a contrail, is called a "dust train/trail". You can also see a persistent trail (which is self luminous) being formed by the fireball, and in some of the footage you can see it dimming and disappearing a second or two after the fireball has made the trail. It looks like fire (red in colour), but it's not - it's plasma.

See this link for more info and full definitions.
edit on 17-2-2013 by FireballStorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:21 PM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


I read they are returning in spring to search the lake but I didn’t read anywhere that the hole was from something else. The hole could be made by detonating explosives under the water but it would have to be a fairly large amount then there is the lack of ice around it which would have been scattered around the area. Melting the ice would get rid of the fragments or something pushing the ice down which a meteor could do. If you have an article stating something else made the hole could you post it?



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:27 PM
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Anyone else find it strange that the MSM hasn't mentioned the possibility of Reptilians? Usually if the media isn't talking about something, then that is what it is. Seems strange though. I've heard suspicions of meteors, missles, small planes, large birds, but no Reptilian attack..... I'm beginning to get worried......



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:33 PM
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Removed by user.
edit on 17-2-2013 by intrptr because: Sorry Rising Against . I know better. My bad...



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:38 PM
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Cross section of that ice is so tiny, if you expected to see a tunnel bored through it, that could never happen. If the angle of impact was anything like 30+ grades, it would be just like a circle. And such tiny layer of ice would not explode as if the meteorite hit some glacier.



posted on Feb, 17 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 


and unless the shot is taken from directly above, it's hard to conclude that it's not more of an ellipse shaped hole.





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