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HAARP being heard once again on HAM Radio

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posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


When you research into it you will find it absolutely can be picked up on a HAM radio.




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:09 PM
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Originally posted by SaveTheWolves
reply to post by Phage
 


Very interesting. Now those were from Alaska. Russia has HAARP but do you know of any other countries that have it? I wonder if it always looks the same regardless of who is doing it.

We have one in northern Norway as well.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:18 PM
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I watched the video. Why is the color of the interior of the car changing?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 02:36 PM
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My father has been a HAM operator for around 15 years. Next time I talk to him I will ask him what he thinks about it.

On another note, that video took me back to my childhood riding around with him while he was yackin away with people he would never meet in real life. Always fascinated me, but never enough to persue a liscense.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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That noise is called intermod or intermodulation, it is splash over from a commercial repeater into this persons radio that is a very wide band receiver and it is NOT Haarp. The noise is data being sent over the air NOT Haarp. if you are in Any major city with a similar radio you will get the same noise. BTW that radio operates well above any haarp frequency in the VHF and UHF part of the spectrum, Haarp is LOW Band. I have heard that same sound in the VHF and UHF band many times in the last 40 years of my involvement in radio communications. nice post.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by juleol
 


That's interesting! I wonder what these HAARP things are for? Thanks for that information!



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Foundryman
 


I can only assume the color changing effect is to ... heck I don't know! LOL



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:19 PM
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posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by wondermost
 


Yes! Please do ask him and post what he thinks about it. I would really appreciate it!

I remember the days before cell phones, the ham operator I know would blow peoples minds with his portable one because he could make phone calls with it. One time we had hiked to the top of a mountain and he called my parents on the phone and told them where we were. LOL Ahhh the good old days.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by jaytay
 


Interesting! I will run your info past my Ham and see what he thinks. Thanks!



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks for helping me to get my facts so I can distort them later. LOL

Interesting links. The second one was over my head part of the time...maybe a lot of the time. LOL

What's your opinion about HAARP? Do you think it's for just what they say it's for? Or do you think there is more to it than they admit to?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by SaveTheWolves
 

I think it for what "they" say it's for.
And so is EISCAT and so is Sura.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by SaveTheWolves
 




When you research into it you will find it absolutely can be picked up on a HAM radio.



I hear a strong interfering signal in the ham bands. Is this HAARP?

HAARP is not authorized to operate in the Ham bands and the transmitter has been "locked out" of those frequencies. In addition, because of the harmonic relationship of the amateur 40 and 80 meter bands, it is not possible for a harmonic of the HAARP transmitter to fall in those bands.
How can I report suspected interference from the HAARP HF Transmitter?

Suspected interference should be reported to the Federal Communications Commission. HAARP maintains an interference reporting "hotline" at the phone number (907) 822-5497. This line is always answered during HF Transmitter operations. At all other times, a recording indicates that the transmitter is not in use.


www.haarp.alaska.edu...



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


That's their story and they're sticking to it.


Don't forget, Alaska isn't the only game in town when it comes to this stuff.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by SaveTheWolves
reply to post by Foundryman
 


I can only assume the color changing effect is to ... heck I don't know! LOL


It's a false flag I'm sure.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 01:24 AM
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reply to post by Cory and Trevor
 


LOL! A diversionary tactic!



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:02 AM
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I haven't seen many HAM radios in my life, though my grandfather used to operate one, and I got to read his old books he needed to study for certification. His radio was old, with many large boxes for whatever purposes, all going to a 11m antenna I think.

Anyways, is the radio a CB radio in the car, or a modern smaller HAM radio? A CB radio is WAY different.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:09 AM
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Originally posted by SaveTheWolves
HAARP Pulse Heard on Ham Radio

I know a HAM operator that used to hear the Russian woodpecker back in the early eighties. Now he is reporting hearing similar sounds again. What he has been hearing recently sounds like the sounds on this video. Supposedly the Russians stopped using the woodpecker in the late eighties. Could they be experimenting with it again? And what was the original purpose of it?



Nah. The Woodpecker was a monopulse over-the-horizon HF radar. It did not sound like that. I can tell the 'ham' in this vid never heard ol' Woody. The reason that they called it a woodpecker was that it sounded like one. Tap tap tap tap. No modulation at all.

This signal sounds like a low baud rate FSK modem. Lots of people send data over HF that way.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:11 AM
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Originally posted by FlySolo

I'm not so sure we could hear the HAARP frequency with our ears seeing the H stands for High Frequency. We can hear up to 7 khz but that sounds a lot lower.


You can't hear radio with your ears, no matter what frequency it is, because radio signals are not sound.

That's why you need a radio receiver to turn it into sound for you.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by SaveTheWolves
 


HAARP doesn't operate on HAM bands.

Whatever the guy is picking up, isn't from HAARP.


Actually, they do. It's right up the middle of the HF range. If you know when it's going to broadcast and what frequency they're going to use, you can occasionally hear it if you have your BFO on, otherwise all you'll hear are faint clicks.

It also doesn't help that HAARP is real directional and aimed upwards.





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