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1947 Roswell Newspaper I found

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posted on Feb, 18 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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I remember reading something about the Roswell UFO when I was young, so I vaguely remember it. As I recall, the book mentioned at first the U.S. Government openly admitted to it being a UFO, but then changed it to a weather balloon. Anywho great find keep going to thrift stores to see if you can find more strange things like this.




posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 05:13 AM
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Nice find, thanks for posting.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by deloprator20000
What is also amazing is that a couple of days BEFORE the famous Roswell incident, two actual balloons crashed. One balloon train was stolen by a couple of punk kids and never recovered . There was no military response, no military squad sent to round up the kids and recover the balloon, no cover story, in fact no story at all.

There was another crashed balloon this time it was recovered by a rancher, the rancher promptly alerted the authorities and they came and recovered the balloon. Take note, there was no flight to Wright AFB, no military squad sent to pick up the crashed pieces by hand, no cover stories about "flying discs", no retractions, top military brass were not alerted -- all in all both cases of an actual crashed balloons were treated very differently from the famous Roswell incident.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


This is a good point, it would've been easier to sell the 'Weather Balloon' story if the Roswell
Base people had not mentioned that the material had been sent off to higher authorities.
Certainly, sending out a group of Military folk out into the desert to retrieve the debris would
make residents of the area wonder if something unusual had happened.

I've even heard that it was normal for ranchers to bring in downed scientific weather balloons
on the off-chance of a reward. It's been said that many in the area around New Mexico Air
Bases were familair with these sort of devices.

Granted, the Military may have been given a heads-up if the wreckage was a device used in
clandestine activities such as Project Mogul and the information gathered was needed elsewhere.
But are we to believe the guys who sent the balloon up watched it sail away and the looked at
each other and muttered "er...how do we get it back?!!"

So Mack found the damaged reflectors, the thin balsa I-beams withe decorative tape and the
mangled latex skin, didn't recognise it as a balloon and after storing some of it in a shed, he went
into town (without any of the material?) and notified the local radio station that he'd found a
flying saucer.
Didn't he realise that he'd look a fool when asked to deliver the proof?
AND if it was just a fallen balloon, then why did the Army keep Brazel locked-up for a week?

A while later, Mack Brazel and his family moved away, he seemed to come into abit of money
and supposedly bought a new truck and Meat Packing company.
It makes you think, huh?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 05:44 PM
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Would you consider selling it? I'm an avid newspaper collector and would love to add to my collection!



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: [post=15926821]Catalyst317[/post
Is this the July 8, 1947 issue and would you be willing to sell this piece?



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 12:43 PM
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You should be able to find replicas easy enough. I have one myself. I actually had Donald Schmidt sign it at a convention years ago.


It's just too bad they only recovered one of those high speed weather ballons.
You know the ones that carry those little parachuting dummies.
I kind of wish they were still around. They would make good action figures for our kids to play with.


LOL.

I still wonder at the idea that anyone could recover a MOGUL balloon array, and think it alien debris. The idea of it is laughable to the extreme. There's simply no way they did.

Then again, so is the Air Force's use of the dummies as a scapegoat (laughable), considering that project was 5 years AFTER the Roswell incident.
edit on 4-10-2018 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok


I still wonder at the idea that anyone could recover a MOGUL balloon array, and think it alien debris. The idea of it is laughable to the extreme. There's simply no way they did.



Jesse 'I Want To Believe' Marcel could.



I was met at the General's office by a Lt. Col. or Col. who told me that some one had found a flying saucer in New Mexico and they had it in the General's Office. And that a flight had been set up to send it to Wright Patterson AFB, OH., but the General suspicioned that it might be meteorological equipment or something of that nature and wanted it examined by qualified meteorological personnel. The Col. and I walked into the General's office where this supposed flying saucer was lying all over the floor. As soon as I saw it, I giggled and asked if that was the flying saucer...

... While I was examining the debris, Major Marcel was picking up pieces of the target sticks and trying to convince me that some notations on the sticks were alien writings. There were figures on the sticks lavender or pink in color, appeared to be weather faded markings with no rhyme or reason. He did not convince me these were alien writings... I have been quoted and misquoted. The facts remain as indicated above.


Irving Newton, Warrant Officer, Fort Worth base weather and flight service center.





Then again, so is the Air Force's use of the dummies as a scapegoat (laughable), considering that project was 5 years AFTER the Roswell incident.


The 'bodies' were attributed to faulty dates and unrelated accidents; as I was reminded myself, even the UFO-obsessed Marcel in the 1970s couldn't remember when Roswell had occurred.

Again, in a nutshell: on 14th June 1947, Mac Brazel found and swept a pile of sticks and tin foil under a brush... cue Ken Arnold and a media reward... the story becomes: on 4th July 1947, Mac Brazel witnessed a UFO crash and swept pieces of an alien spaceship under a brush.







edit on 4-10-2018 by ConfusedBrit because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 02:49 PM
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Pardon my bluntness....but are you high? (sorry, tongue in cheek, I don't really mean that)...


Jesse 'I Want To Believe' Marcel could.


Newton's testimony is about the "debris" set up in the office for the cover story. It has nothing to do with the debris that was carted up and loaded into two cargo planes, to be researched.

Nor does it explain why a military cordon was set up (for a project that used unclassified materials) for the debris recovery.


The 'bodies' were attributed to faulty dates and unrelated accidents; as I was reminded myself, even the UFO-obsessed Marcel in the 1970s couldn't remember when Roswell had occurred.


Umm...the AIR FORCE, not witnesses, gave the High Dive dummies as explanations for the bodies witnesses saw. This shoddy attempt to claim all witnesses are remembering different incidents is completely laughable.

UFO obsessed Marcel? Writers had to track this story down, not the other way around.

Perhaps this will help you:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Read through it, and see if you feel the same. I went into this case fully expecting to prove Mogul. However, the evidence did not lead there at all.



edit on 4-10-2018 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: A boy in a dress
It makes you think, huh?

Makes me think, "Well, that's the damned Army for you."



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 07:00 PM
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Well first it was instrument / high altitude balloon that can detect nuclear explosions. Three years later it became the mogul / dummy excuse, since the previous excuse didn't account for reports of bodies. I also don't think for a moment that Air Force officers would mistake a balloon and tinfoil for a UFO. I mean c'mon.. he took materials home to show his family, because it was so strange.

He was that dense, as to mistake foil from a balloon / instrument as something extraordinary? I don't buy that at all. The base itself allowed the story of a captured UFO to be printed. How many officers looked at the debris before they OK'd that story? And they were all bamboozled by mundane materials? I'm thinking not...



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: Catalyst317

You can buy these now, printed on 20 year old paper, framed, on ebay, for $20 bucks. You can even get t-shirts with the front page printed on them.

Just put 'Roswell newspaper" in ebay search.

eta - you can also get a copy of the newspaper for $16.99 which has the whole story. I picked up one for funnsies. I can frame it myself if I want.





edit on 10/4/2018 by angeldoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: Gazrok

originally posted by: Gazrok
I still wonder at the idea that anyone could recover a MOGUL balloon array, and think it alien debris. The idea of it is laughable to the extreme. There's simply no way they did.

Then again, so is the Air Force's use of the dummies as a scapegoat (laughable), considering that project was 5 years AFTER the Roswell incident.



originally posted by: Gazrok

Read through it, and see if you feel the same. I went into this case fully expecting to prove Mogul. However, the evidence did not lead there at all.


I explained in my thread HERE, it wasn't a fully equipped MOGUL balloon array. It was an in between launch of a MOGUL Service or Research flight that crashed. These were simple flights that would carry balloons, foil radar targets, sonobouy, misc equipment, or any combination of these for the continued testing of the program. What people fail to understand is that MOGUL was never an established program and went through testing throughout it's history. The entire program was ultimately cancelled because of poor results. To believe only flights being launched from Alamogordo were numbered 1000 foot MOGUL arrays, is wrong. Evidence supports the launching and creation of these smaller flights through technical reports, drawings, correspondence, interviews, photographs, etc. of the period.

As far as the crash test dummy answer by the Air Force, they felt forced to come up with a reason for all of the ridiculous reports of alien bodies being found. They came up with a false memory which is as ridiculous as the alien tale of Roswell itself. There was no need to even acknowledge this fabricated portion of the Roswell claim, unfortunately they chose to.

It's disappointing researching the story and finding what I believe is a logical explanation to the "crash" and see nonsense inane threads like: "Alien spacecraft seen in Chicago skies!" -turns out to be balloons. Or "Alien mummy found in tomb in South America!!!" -which again is another BS attention grabbing thread, all at the top. But of course sensationlized garbage usually wins out over a logical and realistic explanation. BS sells.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 08:42 PM
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The problem is that this explanation fails on many levels. For starters, the numerous deathbed confessions, and multiple witnesses describing the properties of the debris. We also have the DOCUMENTED and FACTUAL flights to the two top Army bases for evaluating foreign technology. Why the hell would they do that, for such mundane materials?

As for bodies, again, numerous witnesses, who have maintained their stories, and not wavered on the points. Even numerous witnesses describing the same threatening officer about silence. For a MOGUL like project?

Sorry, none of it washes. I read your thread. Try mine.



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: Gazrok

Way to go Gaz!







posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 11:40 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
The problem is that this explanation fails on many levels. For starters, the numerous deathbed confessions, and multiple witnesses...


No, sorry but for starters actually begins at the start. You don't skip over the baseline of the story for decades later deathbed confessionals or eyewitness testimony and so forth as many believers/supporters of this tale like to do. Mac Brazels story as reported on July 8 1947 (not decades later), undoubtedly describes a large balloon and a radar target(s) to a T. Down to the Scotch tape and eyelets used. But I'll use the standard 1978 description everyone uses to be fair and make my point.

The story begins with the crash of a claimed alien spacecraft constructed of:
- Foil-like material
- Small sticks
- Tough paper
- Rubber material
Time frame/Location:
- The crash occurred in June/July 1947.
- The crash site was 75 +/- miles northwest of Roswell NM.

-------------------------------------------------------------

MOGUL Service/Research flights carried cargo constructed of:
- Foil
- Small sticks
- Tough paper
- Rubber material
Time frame/Location
- MOGUL moved to Alamogordo NM in June 1947.
- Balloon flights were being launched 80 miles southwest of the "alien" crash site in June 1947.
- A "regular" balloon launch from Alamogordo was recorded on June 4, 1947.
- Reports were made to the Regional Aircraft Committee stating winds were carrying balloon flights north and descending in the area of Roswell.
- A full MOGUL array crashed 25 miles east of Roswell NM on June 5th, 1947.

So, to sum up... exact same construction methods, exact same time frames, exact same general locations-balloon launches were occurring only 80 miles away from the alien spacecraft crash. Winds were carrying flights north from Alamogordo towards Roswell. A simple flight was recorded launching on June 4th, 1947. All easy to write off collectively as astronomical coincidences I guess?
edit on 5-10-2018 by Ectoplasm8 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2018 @ 11:59 PM
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originally posted by: fleabit
Well first it was instrument / high altitude balloon that can detect nuclear explosions. Three years later it became the mogul / dummy excuse, since the previous excuse didn't account for reports of bodies. I also don't think for a moment that Air Force officers would mistake a balloon and tinfoil for a UFO. I mean c'mon.. he took materials home to show his family, because it was so strange.

He was that dense, as to mistake foil from a balloon / instrument as something extraordinary? I don't buy that at all. The base itself allowed the story of a captured UFO to be printed. How many officers looked at the debris before they OK'd that story? And they were all bamboozled by mundane materials? I'm thinking not...


That right there gets to the real heart of the matter.

Those people back then were pretty sharp on their respective games, and not prone to make mistakes doing their jobs, let alone make themselves out to be fools that could be so easily fooled, and besides that, many of them were later promoted and one became Chief of staff.







 
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