The Naska Lines: An Alien Blueprint. (amazing discovery!)

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posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by drween
 


Welcome to ATS!




posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:01 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


Instead of looking at the lines like an image, it would be far more useful, and scientific, to look at them like an equation (or series of). Sketching out an image would take hundreds of man hours, is not scientific, is subject to human error, is totally subjective and even once a full image is revealed, why do we think we could understand what it is by looking at it? For instance lets assume it is a schematic, you wouldn't know how to properly read or view it without some key. Schematics are based on specific standards and symbols, what an object looks like visually rarely resembles what it looks like in a schematic, especially when dealing with complex things. Definitionaley, a schematic is a short cut way of viewing something and is dependent on assumptions. To illustrate watch this video.


The lines were created by a system of math, shouldn't we utilize a mathematical approach to view and understand the lines?



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by IndianaJoe
 


You are preaching to the choir. I was asking if a detailed survey had already been conducted on site several pages back. Any code should be evident in the math.

And while that is still true, the more I look at it, the more I get the impression that this is a gigantic work of art. But by all means, try to apply these to a coordinate system. Problem is though, you still need specific and accurate measurements (an actual survey) of the lines or whatever results you come up with will end up looking like fuzzy math.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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Seems really interesting.

I have studied engineering. These are defenetely not electrical schemes (as someone suggested in the beginning, I have not read the whole thread though). Although these look like some kind of drawings, although it might be all in our imagination too


If someone is good at different imagin programs it should not be too hard to highlight the line areas. Even in Photoshop there should be an option (not 100% sure, maybe it was some other program I used) of changing the colours of some color range (all pixels which colours start from around darker gray made black or something similar). Although such method would have quite some noise as there are some whitespots not related to the schematics. Still much better than the ones right now


And btw, nice notice by the OP
edit on 15-2-2013 by Cabin because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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Archaeologists have been surveying Nazca for years. Here is some of the predominate literature on the subject. If you are very interested you can spend $30 bucks for JSTOR access and read and view survey's until your eyes bleed. Instead of reinventing the wheel, you could contact one of the archaeologists and politely ask to view the source GPS measurements they took in their survey. You will probably need a masters degree in CRM or an extensive background in GPS surveying to read and understand what they sent you (i sure as hell would have no idea) , but it would be far more accurate than by drawing lines with microsoft paint. Here are just two articles by experts who have conducted the most recent site survey's at Nasca. These documents exist, unfortunately since they are created with software that is not something normal have on their computer they are not on the internet since no one would be able to open the file. You would have to go to one of the libraries mentioned in the article to actually view the surveys I think, sadly. I just wanted to dismiss the notion that no one has ever modeled Nasca before, some people have spent there whole career on this and deserve credit.

3D Model of Nasca

Nasca and Photogemetery
edit on 15-2-2013 by IndianaJoe because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:20 PM
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reply to post by Cabin
 


Agreed. Some of the Civil Engineering Software would make relatively short work of all of this. Surveying Software too. I mean, we can render maps off of photogrametry work. Why not this. Problem is that that crap is expensive. Haha



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by IndianaJoe
 


I Surveyed Land for over seven years. I imagine I could cope. Thanks for the link.

However, I would much rather see a legit survey done by a licensed surveyor. No offense to Archaeologists, but they aren't land surveyors. The distances here are vast. Lots and lots of room for error.
edit on 15-2-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)


ETA: OK. The second link looks promising. Thanks again!
edit on 15-2-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


Jay since you have the skills to actually use the information, i'm trying to hunt down software that would enable accurate and easy mapping, which is available for free online. I've found, Skyline that seems promising. Skyline


And
XMaP
Which, I believe, would require the actual GPS data points to be entered. There has to be a way to pull the GPS vectors off google maps in some easy way.

I have no idea how to use either program, but them seem like they could be of use and accomplish what OP has been tediously doing by hand.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 06:58 PM
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Still lovin' this thread.

I'm in school for geology, and have access to a ton of academic papers and journals. Without the benefit of a school library, most papers cost 20-30 bucks a pop.

If anyone finds something that looks promising for data or otherwise, PM me the title and author & publication and I'll see if I can grab it for free.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by blamethegreys
 


We pretty much need access to the survey that is mentioned in this paper. I have no idea how to gain access to the actual survey, short of asking the authors for the file itself. The article is free if you search for it on google scholar. Anyone interested in this topic should read the article because it's pretty much the data you need to test this theory. Its bibliography would be a good start to grabbing other important information on the topic, for anyone interested.

The Nasca-Palpa Project: a cooperative approach of
photogrammetry, archaeometry and archaeology

M. Reindel
KAAK, German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Bonn, Germany
A. Gruen
Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry, ETH Zurich, Switzerland



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by 2Faced

Originally posted by Kitora
Awesome thread. Pareidolia runs rampant, but trying to "see in 3D" is interesting...

Here's an old snapshot I had saved on my PC from Google Earth of a spot in the middle of Nazca...

I swear it almost looks like a little alien with tubes going through it.


Here it is colored in...


I suck at tracing, but you get it...
edit on 2/15/13 by Kitora because: (no reason given)




There's even a hint of DNA, bottom left



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by IndianaJoe
 


I'll take a look at those programs here in a couple of hours, but I cannot make any promises. My "expertise" is more geared towards data collection than imaging. In other words, in the Engineering world, this work would be left to CAD drafters.

My whole point in all of this is that if there is already a detailed survey done, and it appears there may be, someone could just get a copy of it and scan it into their computer and run it through an imaging program like CAD. It would cut like 90% of the work out. Also, there are programs out there that will draw lines on its own based basically on visual contrast. But I doubt you would get so lucky with a free program online.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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Interesting...
In the second link above in regards to surveys of the area done, the authors claim to have used magnetetromic measurements and have found structural remains in and amongst the geoglyphs. I was under the impression that there was never any building done in this area.

Sorry to the OP here, but the people that carried out this survey have already mapped the entire site, very accurately. Wire frame models. 3d images. Etc. Its all already been done.
edit on 15-2-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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I don't know if this has already been mentioned or not but they will be discussing all about the Nazca Lines on a new episode of Ancient Aliens tonight...

should be interesting...



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by IndianaJoe
reply to post by blamethegreys
 


We pretty much need access to the survey that is mentioned in this paper. I have no idea how to gain access to the actual survey, short of asking the authors for the file itself. The article is free if you search for it on google scholar. Anyone interested in this topic should read the article because it's pretty much the data you need to test this theory. Its bibliography would be a good start to grabbing other important information on the topic, for anyone interested.

The Nasca-Palpa Project: a cooperative approach of
photogrammetry, archaeometry and archaeology

M. Reindel
KAAK, German Archaeological Institute (DAI), Bonn, Germany
A. Gruen
Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry, ETH Zurich, Switzerland


Paper on the DTM survey work, Lambers & Sauerbier 2005
GIS-based visibility studies of the Nasca geoglyphs at Palpa, Peru

The DTM data set is not available (I tried my damnedest), but most likely held at DAI:

Nasca-Palpa, Peru: Project cooperation group
From the above page:

In the Photogrammetry subproject, modern techniques of photogrammetry and geomatics are developed and adapted to the special requirements of the documentation and analysis of archaeological sites in the Peruvian coastal desert. The research activites encompass the enhancement of automated techniques for the analysis of aerial images of the geoglyphs, aiming at the automatic generation of digital terrain models and a complete mapping of the geoglyphs on the Nasca pampa, the combined use of laser scanning and aerial (model helicopter) photogrammetry for the recording and modeling of stone architecture at the site of Pinchango Alto, and finally the storage, management, and analysis of acquired 3D data on a GIS (geoinformation system) platform in conjunction with the development of new tools for GIS-based archaeological analysis.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 08:54 PM
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As stated, the lines have been mapped with great accuracy, but interpretation as to what the lines mean is still hotly debated among archaeologists. Since little material culture exists and the lines themselves are difficult if impossible to date, no one really knows who occupied Nazca and at what time. The paper I referenced in above posts provides terrific data provides the most detailed and recent site analysis. The data from recent survey's calls into questions previously accepted theories regarding Nazca and when the lines were created. Helaine Silverman and David Browne dated the lines to between 400-650 AD ("New evidence for the date of the Nazca lines". Antiquity 65 (247): 208–220) the modern survey's call into question this time-frame.

Most recent evidence suggests that Nazca went through various eras of occupation and may have been occupied by distinct cultural groups over a 2,000 year (or longer) history. What groups were responsible for making what lines remains unknown. Some believed that Nazca functioned as a religious pilgrimage site (like mecca for instance) and was not a inhabited year round. Others have argued that it operated as a large primitive textile factory for the Paracas culture. Some argue that it was a religious center for sedentary culture which worshiped water deities and studied astronomy.

It is very possible that over its history, Nazca served all these purposes, for all these different cultural groups. It is a gross over simplification to say "Nazca" as it is some distinct social group, trapped in one era of time. The site is far more complex. If you highlight every Line, you will not be able to view the actual message. The original intent of the Lines may be obscured, due to everything from later occupants copying what they saw, later occupants making different markings to serve a unique social function, or modern day use and vandalism.

What is clear is that whomever made the lines, during whatever stage- of-use of the site, wanted to communicate something, to someone, for some purpose. Different sets of lines, made by different people, may all communicate a different ideas. Needless to say an incredible understanding of geometry and surveying skills was employed throughout the course of occupation at the site. Nazca represents one of, if not the most, unique forms of monumental construction in the world. The site has always served some esoteric social function for the people who visited or occupied Nazca. This in itself is an interesting phenomena, seen in only a few locations on the planet. Most occupations both ancient and modern are the result of some practical (non mystical) reason.

What happened all those years ago to make Nazca a special place? No one knows. What I do know, is that the answer, in someway, will come from understanding those damn lines.

The Lines have been mapped, but they remain misunderstood. To approach this problem you need to know what Lines were made when and then apply some mathematical analysis to establish a pattern between the Lines made during the same date range (modern survey's are required for this). The people who wrote the lines had a deep and prideful understanding of complex mathematical concepts and longed to communicate their knowledge of such things to future generations, god, or who knows maybe even aliens. I really believe that mathematical spacial analysis, specifically based on an application of Polar Coordinate systems, is the key to cracking the Nazca code.
edit on 15-2-2013 by IndianaJoe because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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reply to post by IndianaJoe
 


Well, I too have been trying my damndest to find an online source for these surveys and I think I'm about to give up. Haha. But here is a good ite to look at. It appears they DO have a pretty good idea of who was there and when. Apparently there has been a continuous presence there for 4 THOUSAND years. www.dainst.org...

I agree it is still a contentious subject. I was just saying that it should be possible to gain access to a very detailed map of all this stuff that would be on orders of magnitude more accurate than painting lines on Google Earth images. Problem would be contacting the right people and probably paying money for access to the data.

Here is a good place to start a search: Gruen, A. & Lambers, K. 2003. The geoglyphs of Nasca: 3-D recording and analysis with modern digital technologies. Acts of the 14th UISPP Congress, 95-102, University of Liege, Belgium, 2-8 September 2001.
edit on 15-2-2013 by JayinAR because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by JayinAR
 


It's a shame the actual data isn't open source. Fresh sets of eyes looking at this problem may be what actually leads to a breakthrough. It would be awesome to see some of the hypotheses that people here could work on based solid data.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by IndianaJoe
 


I agree. But in light of the extensive work carried out by the aforementioned groups I would have to say that their hypothesies are pretty strong. Especially when one considers that many of the glyphs appear to look like steppe farming diagrams. These people were likely OBSESSED with rainfall by the time their culture died out. I mean, they inhabited an area that had rain, then turned to desert so they moved. Then once they moved they became prone to periodic heavy flooding, but at irregular intervals. The history reads like a slow stranglehold via mother nature.



posted on Feb, 15 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
reply to post by FuzzyNintendo
 


What if:

It's a code.

The lines / points can only be figured out when placed into a computer and let the computer figure it out. It will re-arrange the lines into the true meaning of the code.

Possibly shapes or letters or symbols.


maybe there's a possible correlation between some of the lines and certain forms of cuneiform script, similar to what is found on these sumerian tablets in the following images...











image source





edit on 15-2-2013 by onetwo because: (no reason given)
edit on 15-2-2013 by onetwo because: (no reason given)





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