Has anyone else noticed that Gun Dealers are taking their retail supply and auctioning them off for

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posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:11 PM
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I have noticed a local FFL that is a dealer for SIG say that he is out of SIG 716 rifles and then I saw that he put one on one of the gun auction sites for an opening bid of $700 more than the MSRP. Has anyone else noticed other FFLs doing this? By taking advantage of the demand by taking supply from their local customers and supplying to the national auction market they are certainly fulfilling an economic function but they are also doing their local clientele a disservice. Comments? Reports?




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by CosmicCitizen
I have noticed a local FFL that is a dealer for SIG say that he is out of SIG 716 rifles and then I saw that he put one on one of the gun auction sites for an opening bid of $700 more than the MSRP. Has anyone else noticed other FFLs doing this? By taking advantage of the demand by taking supply from their local customers and supplying to the national auction market they are certainly fulfilling an economic function but they are also doing their local clientele a disservice. Comments? Reports?


Well, if he wants to make a few quick bucks now, sells his entire stock, and keeps customers waiting, I don't think he will be doing business long.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:24 PM
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He's actually trying to stay IN business. It's ironic. The usual issue is local people going to the local store to check out a product, then jumping online to buy it at a discount. Local bookstores, just as one example, are closing in droves because everyone can get a hefty discount at amazon. Competing with online for brick & mortar stores that have to pay retail rents and hire employees to staff the place is an increasingly risky business. Going online may be the only way he can survive.

If you are seriously in the market you could always talk to your local FFL and ask for a deal. Cash in hand talks louder than a potential sale that isn't there yet. Of course, if you're just being theoretical here and not intending to buy anything, well, that's the reason this guy has gone online. If you're not going to buy from him anyway, it's hardly a disservice that he's trying to get business for himself.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by eXia7
 

Temptation....to say the least but a good way to lose "goodwill" at the same time.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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The good news in all of this is that the market is slowly starting to come back as sales slow and manufacturers start to catch up from their back logs. After this whole thing settles down I expect to see a price plummet from all of the remorseful buyers that expected a full on gun ban to go through, coupled with the credit card payments coming due for all the firearm related things they purchased.
edit on 2/13/2013 by SpaDe_ because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:40 PM
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reply to post by SpaDe_
 

I think we will revert back to the mean quite quickly but that ''mean'' will be MSRP when previously you could buy everyday for a 10-20% discount (as demand will stay relatively firm even as supply hits the market in the form of new manufactured product and remorseful buyers wanting to lighten up).



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 12:51 AM
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I noticed a dealer recently (Bud's Gun Shop) who used to list a lot of guns online (fixed price) now putting a lot of them up for auction (Gunbroker.com). It is definitely a trend....why sell for $MSRP when someone will pay more and that way you dont look bad for listing it real high? I guess....



posted on Feb, 20 2013 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by schuyler
 



Local bookstores, just as one example, are closing in droves because everyone can get a hefty discount at amazon. Competing with online for brick & mortar stores that have to pay retail rents and hire employees to staff the place is an increasingly risky business. Going online may be the only way he can survive.


I don't get this at all in the book industry.
A good friend of mine owns a bookstore. I get a good discount from her, but I could still get cheaper on Amazon. However, what I can't get there is quickly seeing books that might interest me, her advice (she knows what I read, and what I like, and can make awesome recommendations), and seeing things I would have never even thought to search for.

THAT is the difference folks.... In a store, you can see other things outside of just your narrow searching, and personal relationships with small store owners (in many different industries) is invaluable. I could go to Lowes, but instead I go to a small mom and pop hardware store. They know what I have, what I do, and more importantly, what I really need.





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