'No Drone Zone' in Virginia?

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posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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'No Drone Zone' in Virginia?


www.flyingmag.com

As the rise of pilotless drones in U.S. airspace becomes more prevalent, some local and state governments are adopting measures to curtail their use. On Monday, the Charlottesville, Virginia, city council became the latest to do so, voting 3-2 in favor of a resolution that “calls on the United States Congress and the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia to adopt legislation prohibiting information obtained from the domestic use of drones from being introduced into a federal or state
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 05:52 PM
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This might be start to the no drone areas. Hopefully other states will not allow drones to fly around and take photos of people and indenify people.

For me this is a breach of privacy. These drones has software on them can recognize people and can relay info back to whoever is flying them. Which I am sure goes into some gov't database. Huge breach of privacy.


“If we don’t get out ahead of [the privacy issue] to establish some guidelines for how drones are used, they will be used in a very invasive way and we’ll be left to try and pick up the pieces,” said Dede Smith, a city councilmember in Charlottesville.


I know the date is a little old for a breaking alternative news. Published: Feb 07, 2013.

www.flyingmag.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 05:57 PM
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Wait until one of these drones accidently crash into a aircraft full of passengers because the operator never saw it.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


I wish I owned a shooting range or was part of a gun club.

I’d like to organize a ‘drone hunt’ and take a few of these things down. Maybe I’ll petition the state of Texas for a ‘drone hunting season’ or something.

It’s good to see local governments around the country standing up to tyranny from our federal regime. I support their effort and encourage more action on the part of the states.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Haha nice.

What they are doing is just redic to me. It's getting out of hand. I hope my state has a "No drone fly zone" soon. I haven't seen one dipping around yet, but I am sure I will.

-SAP-



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by seabag
reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


I wish I owned a shooting range or was part of a gun club.

I’d like to organize a ‘drone hunt’ and take a few of these things down. Maybe I’ll petition the state of Texas for a ‘drone hunting season’ or something.

It’s good to see local governments around the country standing up to tyranny from our federal regime. I support their effort and encourage more action on the part of the states.



That thing would fly over your imaginary gun range and your imaginary drone hunters and be gone before you even had your magazine seated properly in your weapon. Your pictures would be taken and saved in some database.

Not saying I like it, or agree with the drones, but that is the way it would be.
edit on 13-2-2013 by TFCJay because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 08:00 PM
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reply to post by TFCJay
 



That thing would fly over your imaginary gun range and your imaginary drone hunters and be gone before you even had your magazine seated properly in your weapon. Your pictures would be taken and saved in some database.

Not saying I like it, or agree with the drones, but that is the way it would be.


I’m a former Marine….so, if nothing else, I’m at least CONFIDENT that I can pop a few drones if I wanted to. I could be completely misguided in that belief but I hold that belief to be true!


I may be lacking in some areas but confidence and marksmanship aren’t it!!

Even if I overestimate my capabilities, you can rest assured that I’ll damn sure try!




edit on 13-2-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by TFCJay

Originally posted by seabag
reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


I wish I owned a shooting range or was part of a gun club.

I’d like to organize a ‘drone hunt’ and take a few of these things down. Maybe I’ll petition the state of Texas for a ‘drone hunting season’ or something.

It’s good to see local governments around the country standing up to tyranny from our federal regime. I support their effort and encourage more action on the part of the states.




That thing would fly over your imaginary gun range and your imaginary drone hunters and be gone before you even had your magazine seated properly in your weapon. Your pictures would be taken and saved in some database.

Not saying I like it, or agree with the drones, but that is the way it would be.
edit on 13-2-2013 by TFCJay because: (no reason given)


Also, seeing as these things cost a mint, I'd expect they'd be like radar speed traps.

As we say here in Australia...

"If you see a multi-nova, mount the kerb and run it over!"

Sadly, it gets you a $20,000 bill and all sorts of legal fun and games.

So I'm betting bob and his 'drone hunt' would be as much use as .. I dunno, shooting police cars.
edit on 13-2-2013 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by winofiend
 


Well I'm sure the second the operator realizes there's a threat, they shoot back.

-SAP-



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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So these resolutions are really nothing more than asking Congress to do something about it right?

I mean, according to the article, this City Council, or even the State for that matter cannot stop their use.

Am I reading that correctly?



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


In a nutshell yes. However many people want regulations on the use of drones for domestic purposes.


Virginia, city council became the latest to do so, voting 3-2 in favor of a resolution that “calls on the United States Congress and the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia to adopt legislation prohibiting information obtained from the domestic use of drones from being introduced into a federal or state court.”


-SAP-



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:30 PM
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reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


Well certainly anything like that should have rules they have to follow. I'm not really against drones but I don't want them able to do whatever they like with them.

Their purpose should be clearly defined before they ever take off.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


I agree. But these drones do pose a risk to privacy and is the biggest issue I have with them. Most of these drones have facial recognition software on them that can relay info back to whoever.

That is just flat out scary imo.

-SAP-



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by SloAnPainful
 


Yea that's a bit scary. As for just surveillance I think they would be a great tool though. I would like to see the Supreme Court ban the use of stuff like facial recognition on civilians.

Like you said, that is pushing the boundaries of our privacy.

On a side note however, can't they put facial recognition technology on a helicopter if they wanted to?
edit on 13-2-2013 by Hopechest because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by Hopechest
 


Yeah they could, but the thing with a heli is it isn't small. A drone can also move quickly and quietly without you even knowing it's there.

-SAP-



posted on Feb, 14 2013 @ 11:48 AM
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What's interesting is that in every other facet Charlottesville resembles every other upscale heavily democratic city. It's joined on to Agenda 21, was a major stop in the Obama reelection campaign and is home to the University of Virginia (founded by Jefferson but forgot what his principles were).

This is very hopeful then as it crosses party lines when it comes to matters of privacy. Maybe Americans of all stripes are actually scared of the idea of drones buzzing over their city.



posted on Feb, 14 2013 @ 11:50 PM
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As a former VA citizen from Hampton, I can only welcome this approach. Total surveillance can't be the price we pay for security. While I do understand the basic rationale ('we're doing something to protect you'), I doubt the correlation between efficient crime prevention and aerial surveillance. Just like video surveillance in the UK (especially London) didn't reduce the overall amount of incidents, statistically speaking.





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