IQ, Mensa etc.

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posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by JibbyJedi
 

I don't know any members that I know of ( I do have my suspicions though).
Never had much interest. Never saw the point. Never had the energy.




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:11 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Anyone notice a bit of...um...bitterness...in these posts.

Come on...fess up...who applied and didn't make it?
Or, possibly worse, who is a member?


Back in school, I was asked and did three of their tests, but there were no hot chicks at the meetings and at the "Cheese Club" we watched Python, ate savoury snacks and drank lots of wine. Mensa never had a chance.




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 

You didn't mention hot chicks being in the cheese club.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by JibbyJedi
 

I don't know any members that I know of ( I do have my suspicions though).
Never had much interest. Never saw the point. Never had the energy.


If you knew members, in offline life, you'd know about it. They are all braggarts.
Nothing is more satisfying to them than bragging to fresh faces they meet about how they are a part of Mensa.

A piece of advice to anyone who knows or may know a member in the future... DO NOT disagree with ANY of their opinions. They will not stop arguing it.... they will call you at 3AM with a strong point of debate. If they believe the 9/11 OS, just go along with them, don't ever mention the melting point of steel. I am obviously speaking from experience.

I have about 3 friends in Mensa. It is equivalent to the definition of a Cult IMHO.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by chr0naut
 

You didn't mention hot chicks being in the cheese club.


There were chicks, who didn't exactly have to be hot (probably on account of the wine).

Still, by my standards back then, nerdy girls who liked Monty Python, Dungeons and Dragons and alcahol were a definite win and were probably more fun than hot chicks!



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Anyone notice a bit of...um...bitterness...in these posts.

Come on...fess up...who applied and didn't make it?
Or, possibly worse, who is a member?


I have avoided joining organizations, primarily to avoid the types of dramas and politics that groups like that almost certainly fall prey to.

Although ATS drives me nuts more than half the time, we have a great mix of all sorts.
And the more minds we can get, follow the scientific method to develop good info, the better off we will be.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 

Yeah. Sounds like the school newspaper. Wasn't on the staff but spent a lot of time hanging out. Good stereo. Great records.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by chr0naut

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by chr0naut
 

It's a round table.
Everyone who sits at it is equally special.



I can just see them all, sitting round watching Spongebob.


... special!



My guess would be The Simpsons!
WOQ



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 





Still, by my standards back then, nerdy girls who liked Monty Python, Dungeons and Dragons and alcahol were a definite win and were probably more fun than hot chicks!


Yeah.... I have to agree. I had my share of dork girls.
There are 2 kinds of girls in this world.... the kind you marry, and the kind you date.
Nerd girls were always the kind you marry. Go figure... the slutty make up, pierced, tattooed girls weren't the marrying type.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by yadda333
 




Close, so close...

lol



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 12:41 AM
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Originally posted by HomoSapiensSapiens
OK, so the Mensa sites says that an adult can only score a maximum of 161 on the Cattell III B test.

But what if the person were much cleverer than that? Is there no other test to measure beyond 161? Or will it just be so off the charts and away from the norm (i.e. no scale) that it would be irrelevant?


Dear HomoSapiensSapiens,

My IQ is higher than Mensa requires; but, it is just a number. IQ tests are only of what we can measure, they grade on a curve. They compare people of similar demographics (age) to each other. The limit of IQ tests would be a world where everyone except one person go one question right and one person got all the questions right. How would you determine how much smarter the person getting all the questions right was compared to the rest of the population, there can always be more questions, that does not mean the person keeps getting smarter and the rest do not.

To put it in it's simplest terms, there is no limit to intelligence, there is a limit to tests. Three is no way to test to see who is "all knowing", there are only tests for limitations. Peace and a fun question.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:00 AM
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Those test are just that.
Tests created by one human to test another.
How smart was that group of humans to create a test to determine that another was smarter or dumber then them?

How about we take the original testers and throw them out in the wilderness with nothing.
Think they would pass?Probably not.
It's how we got here,right? By surviving and adapting the natural world.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:08 AM
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What we need, is a computer with all knowledge compiled in its data base.

Then, we can compare ours to the whole.

Would this possibly create a more accurate IQ battery?




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:15 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by chr0naut
 

Yeah. Sounds like the school newspaper. Wasn't on the staff but spent a lot of time hanging out. Good stereo. Great records.


The cheese club was way cooler than any other club.

Imagine sitting in a wood-paneled old board room, in old leather upholstered chairs, with a video and TV at one end of the boardroom table.

And you are sitting there, wearing a fez and dressing gown (mandatory dress code) with a balloon glass of cognac hanging from one hand and a cheese & fruit platter in the middle of the table. Slowly getting smashed to the music of Dark Side of the Moon, or watching Python skits or alternately playing D&D with twenty or so friends.

Really good times!

We probably should have called the club "abacus" but "the cheese club" was far more Python.

Now that IS IQ!



edit on 13/2/2013 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:18 AM
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Used to go to the meetings in Austin, owl on the meeting table at a beer hang-out, lots of OCD discussion, no questions allowed unless you wanted to go to the mat with a debate, not my style. I prefer my family, friends, neighbors and my hobbies which are developing better methods of organic gardening with aesthetic qualities and also live music in the home and in town, along with lots of travel off the beaten track. Most of the people I met at the meetings found it difficult to communicate, rarely traveled and were easily upset. I don't mean to put them down, they are great people with great minds and hearts but I just didn't fit in.
edit on 2/13/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:24 AM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by muzzleflash
 

"IQ" is really an obsolete term that isn't used much in the field. There have been a lot of changes in testing techniques but the concept of defining intelligence is slippery.


Agreed.

I am inclined to believe Effort and Modivation are larger factors as opposed to heredity.

If anyone works hard at improving they will. Just gotta keep at it.


So you don't think that genetics plays a part.?

There seems to be pockets of intelligence, not unlike suburbs or towns where people gravitate toward each other.

Families keep producing children that keep producing children that have a cap.

Like doctors produce doctors or actors produce actors.

and.... dimwits produce dimwits.

Yet, you suggest this is individual case by case and everyone can improve?

Not so sure about that...



edit on 13-2-2013 by magma because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:29 AM
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Originally posted by ADVISOR
What we need, is a computer with all knowledge compiled in its data base.

Then, we can compare ours to the whole.

Would this possibly create a more accurate IQ battery?



Wow... a 10 year member. A rare treat.

I think the debate is not about holding on to all this worldly knowledge, but measuring intelligence on a level equal to the majority. Memorization, Jeopardy champions, math geniuses... all seem to be experts in their specific field of study. What about the Jack of all trades guys?

I know guys who couldn't tell you who the vice President was, but could tell you what is wrong with your car, washer, dryer, baseboards, roof, garden, diet, girlfriend/boyfriend, and your cat, all in the same person. Yet, they would probably score a 700 on the SATs.

There has to be a better form of measuring intelligence overall.
edit on 13-2-2013 by JibbyJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
There has to be a better form of measuring intelligence overall.


I agree, there should be.

So, perhaps an aptitude test, similar to the asvab, then based on the results a format of IQ test selected and refined based on cumulative results?




posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by ADVISOR
 

Nah.
"Survivor". Them guys are the really smart 'uns.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 01:49 AM
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God, this thread is embarrassing.... people debating intelligence as if it was a meaningless concept....

"It's just a measurement!"

Yes... and so is temperature.





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