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'The Magical Battle for Britain' during WW2 and how the witches of Britain fought the Nazis.

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posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 05:45 AM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 


Enjoyed watching that again - it's an old family favourite.

Who knows, maybe the rumours had more than some kernel of truth in them, and the film was inspired by whispers of the ''Magical Battle...''






posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 06:37 AM
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Originally posted by alldaylong

Originally posted by Shminkee Pinkee
The Battle of britain was won by, Radar, The RAF's re-organisation by Dowding, British Tenacity and pig-headedness, the Hurricane and Spitfire, and the brave pilots from a myriad of nations who flew them, including Poland, India, France, Holland, Canada, USA, Czechoslovakia (as it was then), South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and of course the UK, not too mention the RN who protected convoys bringing us vital supplies from Canada and the USA. It was also won because of Nazi arrogance and mistakes on their part, for one they believed they were invincible, they bombed London by mistake which led Churchill to order a bombing of Berlin which infuriated Hitler so he demanded all bombing be concentrated on London, giving the RAF time to re-group and replace planes, they also believed Fighter Command was finished and switched their targets to industry. The battle of Britain was not won by wizards, warlocks and Merlin and King Arthur, the very idea insults the people who died to protect this island from Nazi Invasion.


You are wrong. Merlin did win the Battle Of Britain for us. It was the Rolls Royce Merlin engines that powered the Spitfire and Hurricane aircraft.



Ha ha good point :-)



posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by NavyDoc
''They even made a movie about it'':


Bedknobs and Broomsticks originally called Bonfires and Broomsticks

by Mary Norton - she also wrote the Borrowers [ i loved those books when I was little ]

Yes i think you are right though -- maybe Mary Norton knew something ? Wonderful author though


She began working for the War Office in 1940 before the family moved temporarily to the United States. She began writing while working for the British Purchasing Commission in New York during the Second World War. Her first book was The Magic Bed Knob; or, How to Become a Witch in Ten Easy Lessons published in 1943, which, together with the sequel Bonfires and Broomsticks, was re-issued as Bed-Knob and Broomstick illustrated by Erik Blegvad, in 1957, and later became the basis for the Disney film Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

Norton died of a stroke in Bideford, Devon, England on 29 August 1992


en.wikipedia.org...(author)
edit on 12-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by rockymcgilicutty
reply to post by neformore
 


Jumping in kinda late aren't you I made all those points eariler.


Its irrelevant when he made these points- similar points to what I had made previous to your posts- you clearly have a 'Hollywood abridged' version of WWII where the good 'ol USA rode in and saved the day- unfortunatley for you, this isnt historic fact. Exactly 7 US pilots flew combat with the RAF during the Battle of Britain ( for which, as has been pointed out, the RAF flew entirely with British made aircraft). Its ok raving about D-day, Sicily & Italy and post Pearl Harbour exploits of the US military, but if Britain hadnt have stood up alone against the Nazi's for a considerable time (whilst Russia had a military pact with Germany right up to the start of Barbarossa in '41), then Europe would have been over-run and America could not have done anything about it (where are you going to launch an invasion from if Britain fell?)

These discussions are off topic, repetative and undermine the legacy of the bravery of the veterans of that conflict, (US and British) but I cannot bear to see such nonsense go unchallenged. This happens all the time- case in point, the film 'U-571'. Absolute Hollywood BS, and based on the exploits of a Royal Navy vessel, HMS Bulldog and her crew, who depth charged U110 in the North Atlantic in 1941, forced her to surface, then went onboard and recovered the Enigma machine that enabled British intelligence to break the German codes. The real U-571 was never involved in any such events, was not captured, and was in fact sunk in January 1944, off Ireland, by a Short Sunderland flying boat from No. 461 Squadron, Royal Australian Air Force. Now everyone thinks it was Matthew McConaughey and Jon Bon Jovi.....


Oh yes, and the first 'Eagle' squadron (71 Sqn) became active in Feb 1941 at RAF Church Fenton (in the North, long after the end of the Battle of Britain- Eagle Sqns had healthy careers, but werent shooting down German aircraft until 21 July 1941 when P/O William R. Dunn destroyed a Messerschmitt Bf 109F over Lille.)
edit on 12-2-2013 by Thunda because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


I totally agree
second line

On topic - i am trying to past a bit of the PDF link posted by Fly in the Ointment
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Brilliant PDF article about Crowley, Fortune, Flemming etc


THE OCCULT WAR - Secret Agents, Magicians and Hitler
Michael Howard

It is surprising the number of practitioners of the magical arts and witchcraft who were involved in military and intelligence work during the Second World War.

Perhaps the best known ‘occult spy’ operating in the Second World War, and in fact long before, and whose intelligence career as been well documented, is Aleister Crowley.

Author Dr Richard B. Spence believes that Crowley began his journey to being a secret agent when he took an oath of allegiance to the British Crown. This was at the Malvern College boarding school in 1891 when he joined the cadet corps of the local Worcestershire Royal Artillery Volunteers.

Later in life Crowley was to say that despite his problems and issues with the British establishment he had always felt that he was bound to that oath. In fact it had strengthened his link with England (Spence 2008:17).

It is possible he meant on a magical and psychic level as well as the physical and patriotic one. As a young man, through an introduction by his aunt who was a member, Crowley joined the Primrose League.

. This was a semi-secret, quasi-Masonic, right-wing group within the Conservative Party whose aim was to protect it from its political enemies.

Dr Spence suggests that Crowley’s Jacobite sympathies in support of the return of the Stuart dynasty to the British throne to replace the Hanoverian usurpers, could have been used by the League to persuade Crwoley to spy on potential enemies of the Crown...........



Gosh Crowley agrees with me about something else also
edit on 12-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 12 2013 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


You pretty much summed up ALL MY STATEMENT's.What you choose to read into my replies is your concern.




Its irrelevant when he made these points- similar points to what I had made previous to your posts- you clearly have a 'Hollywood abridged' version of WWII where the good 'ol USA rode in and saved the day- unfortunatley for you, this isnt historic fact. Exactly 7 US pilots flew combat with the RAF during the Battle of Britain ( for which, as has been pointed out, the RAF flew entirely with British made aircraft). Its ok raving about D-day, Sicily & Italy and post Pearl Harbour exploits of the US military, but if Britain hadnt have stood up alone against the Nazi's for a considerable time (whilst Russia had a military pact with Germany right up to the start of Barbarossa in '41), then Europe would have been over-run and America could not have done anything about it (where are you going to launch an invasion from if Britain fell?)


That's is the sum of what I said.
Go back cut and paste where I said anything different.If you edit my statements I will post them in full.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 04:48 AM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


Really? I dont see where you pointed out that Eagle squadron werent active during the Battle of Britain......



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


Thank you for agreeing with me.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


why don't you ask the debate mods if you can debate this on their forums - seriously . It would be good to watch.
I am gonna start calling you 'dog' [ dog with a bone - who won't let go]

he was not agreeing with you as you well know

However - I would like to say that back to the RAF they had at least one psychic recruit - Michael Bentin - who happened to become very famous in later llife:
edit on 13-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:26 AM
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Originally posted by HelenConway
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


why don't you ask the debate mods if you can debate this on their forums - seriously . It would be good to watch.
I am gonna start calling you 'dog' [ dog with a bone - who won't let go]

he was not agreeing with you as you well know

However - I would like to say that back to the RAF they had at least one psychic recruit - Michael Bentin - who happened to become very famous in later llife:
edit on 13-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)


Got to tag you on this one.. Did you know Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, Commander of RAF fighter Command during the Battle of Britain was a confirmed spiritualist, and indeed had a firm belief in fairies.. he was a noted member of the "Fairy Investigation Society" and "The Ghost Club"



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


I was and have been trying to end it.If you want to end it also why don't you tell the other folk's?Why are you so focused on me?



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


I'm not
I likes you dog !



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by thoughtsfull

Originally posted by HelenConway
reply to post by rockymcgilicutty
 


why don't you ask the debate mods if you can debate this on their forums - seriously . It would be good to watch.
I am gonna start calling you 'dog' [ dog with a bone - who won't let go]

he was not agreeing with you as you well know

However - I would like to say that back to the RAF they had at least one psychic recruit - Michael Bentin - who happened to become very famous in later llife:
edit on 13-2-2013 by HelenConway because: (no reason given)


Got to tag you on this one.. Did you know Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, Commander of RAF fighter Command during the Battle of Britain was a confirmed spiritualist, and indeed had a firm belief in fairies.. he was a noted member of the "Fairy Investigation Society" and "The Ghost Club"


I did not know that - that is very interesting.
I will have to read more about that.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


Back at you
But check my avatar it;s The Dude, not Dog.



posted on Feb, 13 2013 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


If you are going to read more, check out his wife.. Muriel Douding, her autobiography should give you an indication where they both stood on this topic, her book is called "The psychic life of Muriel, the Lady Dowding"

I will add this bit, albeit a tad reluctantly, Lord and Lady Douding where also a members of the Theosophical Society, the one founded by (amongst others) Helena Blavatsky..

en.wikipedia.org...

And that is the Commander of Fighter Command during the Battle Of Britain.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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This is indeed true- Dowding was a confirmed spiritualist.

Michael Bentine was also a spiritualist- his mother was a medium, and he claimed to have seen his brother at the foot of his bed in full flying kit, dripping wet, at the exact time he had been shot down and killed in the channel during the Battle of Britain. His autobiography is a very interesting read.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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We'll be discussing this thread on ATS Live tonight - more info here



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by HelenConway
 


Fascinating thread! Not so long ago I wondered how one might organize such a group effort, a joining of the powers of good to expose and defuse the growing hysteria of fear and hate mongering......some what reassuring to see that it had actually been done once before.

Might call on you for help someday.

-frayed



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 03:31 PM
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A bit more on Dowding:

"Lord Hugh Dowding (1882-1970) is a famous Air Chief Marshal of the Royal Air Force Fighter Command (RAF) during the crucial period of the Battle of Britain in World War Two. He made important public statements on UFOs in 1954, a year when a flying saucer wave hit Europe hard. Author Colin Bennett has called him “a very great Briton of truly mythological status.” Hugh Caswall Tremenheere, 1st Baron Dowding, was also a well known spiritualist, ghost hunter, vegetarian, and humanitarian, who published several books on psychic phenomena like Many Mansions (1943), Twelve legions of angels (1946), The Dark Star (1951), and God’s magic: An aspect of spiritualism (1960). Despite his eccentric beliefs, Lord Dowding had an impeccable military career and was a key of figure in the Battle of Britain.

Dowding retired from the RAF in 1942 as he was not skilled in dealing with political maneuvering at the RAF and Churchill’s cabinet—he was nicknamed “Stuffy”—and his public adherence to spiritualism probably also affected his military career. Retired, Dowding could now concentrate on his spiritualist writings and other eccentric activities like being a member of the Fairy Investigation Society and the Ghost Club. When the flying saucer wave hit Europe in 1954, London’s Sunday Dispatch published a long statement on UFOs by the former Air Chief Marshal on July 11, which we quote in part:

"More than 10,000 sightings have been reported, the majority of which cannot be accounted for by any ‘scientific’ explanation, e.g. that they are hallucinations, the effects of light refraction, meteors, wheels falling from aeroplanes, and the like…. They have been tracked on radar screens…and the observed speeds have been as great as 9,000 miles an hour…. I am convinced that these objects do exist and that they are not manufactured by any nation on earth. I can therefore see no alternative to accepting the theory that they come from some extraterrestrial source." (via rafweb.org and (nolink))

He was truly visionary when it came to his defense of Britain during the battles of 1940- tying together the new technology of radar into a modern GCI method which saved the day in terms of budgeting the UK's scant resources and avoiding wasteful standing patrols. He also is famous for refusing to send further RAF fighters to France when it was obvious the battle there was lost.

He was also a humanist, and took his responsibilities of sending young men into bloody battles extremely seriously. Im paraphrasing here, but I heard it said that he called his young fighter pilots his 'chicks', and he wept when they were killed.



posted on Feb, 16 2013 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by Thunda
 


that is fascinating - i am going to have to read more about him and his wife.






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