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Empty shelves, food shortage? as Northeast on high alert 2ft snow epic winter blizzard NEMO

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posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


Yeah, I hear ya. This is going to be horrific for people still out of their homes or in the process of rebuilding from Sandy.




posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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I hope no one goes without the necessities and may they learn to prepare ahead because we all know that stores sell out of the essentials when the time for needing them comes.

Where I live in NY they are saying 16-24 inches total


Not looking forward to it at all. With high winds late tonight could lose power.... we usually do in my area. So phones, dvd player, my kids leappads and even my old gameboy are charged and ready to go. Food and water stocked as well.

I hope Boston and every other place that is it going to get it worse than us does better than expected and people stay safe. Snow happens and it might not be as bad as they say but it's always better to be prepared.

edit on 8-2-2013 by brandiwine14 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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It's sad about the folks from the hurricane but Katrina and the lawyers pretty much likked any help FEMA is going to be. Trailer companies will never sell to the government again thanks to that mess



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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2 feet of snow is nothing, big cities, like buffalo and cleveland, around the great lakes get 8-10 feet of snow a year and they don`t close the cities down when it snows.

I believe that the reason we are seeing the MSM make a big deal out of rain and snow storms lately is because a lot of cities have crumbling infrastructure that can`t handle what are just normal weather conditions.weather like this was no problem in the past and it shouldn`t be a problem now if the infrastructure was being appropriately maintained.
edit on 8-2-2013 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:07 PM
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in my short life time i have seen snow fall of more than 6 foot on more than 2 occasions and have seen a large train with the snow more than 3 foot above it in the photo that one of my family took while employed by the railway .in the 70s ..

moscow has 6 foot of snow the worst in a hundred yrs



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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Hi All;

It is not the snow that is the worry...it is the 9:00 pm-ish threat of yet another tidal surge. For the third time in 16 months, an historic storm is hitting my state's coastline at an astronomical high tide. The first time was hurricane Irene. The second time was hurricane Sandy. Now, we have Nemo. The tidal surge warnings have been playing along the tickertapes of all the local channels since yesterday.

Also eerily like Sandy is the fact that two storms, one heavily laden with moisture from the south and one coming at us from the west, will once again perfectly merge right above our heads to create hurricane-strength winds of up to 70 mph. The last time this happened was 1992. Prior to that, it was 1928, if I recall correctly.

This statistically improbable combination of astronomical high tide and duel-storm merging allowed Sandy to pour a full seven feet of water into many of my area neighborhoods, which is unprecedented. Irene had previously beaten the 100-year high water mark by 5 inches at a high mark of 4 feet. Sandy almost doubled this level.

There has most certainly been an uptick in coastal weather events, and they are increasing in severity in my area. You cannot begin to imagine the financial and emotional ruin these events have caused.

And don't dare mention FEMA as a fallback for affected communities. Flood insurance is absolutely worthless. From firsthand knowledge I can assure you that it is a federal redistribution scam on a grand scale. They take from the homeowners and give it all to the renters who never bought policies, even though it is a local statute that renters must hold a policy. Flood insurance policies cover almost NOTHING in terms of structural damage. All they do is offer SBA loans provided that you agree to let the federal government put a lien on your home for the loan amount. Yeah, right. Bite me.

And, for the love of God, do NOT donate to the Red Cross. They told so many of my neighbors that they had nothing to offer them...nothing...despite the hundreds of millions of dollars they were collecting in donations. But, hey, the guy who runs Red Cross just gave himself a $6 million bonus, so all is great in the world.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by snowspirit
Yep. I prefer to live where we know how to deal with major snow.
I concur...




posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 


No kidding.

Shoveling snow in one hand and holding a beer in the other can get quite dangerous... And then 3 hours later having to go back out to do it again and you've run out of beer ?

What a nightmare !



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:48 PM
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Reporting from VT

We've gotten around 5-6 inches of snow throughout the day.
The slednecks around here spend more on snowmachines than regular vehicles so no worries there...
We also have some of the best snow drivin hillbillies around and you can't teach that in stores.

Had some snow flakes falling into my coffee earlier though... When they melted the liquid stayed on the surface and closer inspections showed rainbow colored oil drops floating on the surface. So I brought a cup of regular tap water outside and the same thing happened to the water.

I bet it's frozen smog from china.
hard tellin', not knowin'.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 04:54 PM
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I have worked 3rd shift at a grocery store and blizzards cause people to do funny things. The things people purchase most is milk, bread, cigarettes, beer. I am a non-drinking non-smoker, so I think that is ridiculous. People were also coming out in blizzards to get cat food. Apparently you can't tell a cat to just wait until the sun comes up and roads are cleared. And diapers, but that I can understand.
I had one customer in the worst part of the worst snow in decades come in to purchase just one thing: tampons. When I pointed out that the conditions were so bad we were fortunate to have milk and bread and the like, and suggest he might want to take something else home, you know, in case they were snowed in?......... "NO. She told me to go out in this $#!t to get tampons and that is all I am going to get."
The poster who wondered about getting gas is so right! Unless you are getting gas for your generator, why waste time in a gas line? And a hint for those of you with cars....take the one that is best on snow and ice and park it toward the end of your driveway. That way you won't have to shovel your entire driveway to get out. Wouldn't you rather dig 12 feet than 40 or more? My dad was from Connecticut and always did this and we were always the first people out on the road in our neighborhood.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by stars15k
 


Filling your car with gas kinda seems smart to me...

1.) The car can keep you warm if you need to evacuate the house for any reason.

2.) The gas in the tank can be taken back out and used to start a fire outside if needed.

3.)Keeping more gas in the tank can help prevent against the freezing of water that may be in your gas tank.

4.)You'll have plenty of gas to blow donuts in the gas station parking lot after hours when the snow stops



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by Dividuality


Had some snow flakes falling into my coffee earlier though... When they melted the liquid stayed on the surface and closer inspections showed rainbow colored oil drops floating on the surface. So I brought a cup of regular tap water outside and the same thing happened to the water.

I bet it's frozen smog from china.
hard tellin', not knowin'.


That doesn`t sound good

Go out and get a big pan full of snow and melt it on the stove and tell us what the water looks like after it melted.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 06:22 PM
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enough with the doom porn

I just left my job where a tanker hauling 10,000 gallons of propane had just arrived

somehow we will get by without shopping for 24 hous



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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Originally posted by NaturalHealer
Hi All;

It is not the snow that is the worry...it is the 9:00 pm-ish threat of yet another tidal surge. For the third time in 16 months, an historic storm is hitting my state's coastline at an astronomical high tide. The first time was hurricane Irene. The second time was hurricane Sandy. Now, we have Nemo. The tidal surge warnings have been playing along the tickertapes of all the local channels since yesterday.

Also eerily like Sandy is the fact that two storms, one heavily laden with moisture from the south and one coming at us from the west, will once again perfectly merge right above our heads to create hurricane-strength winds of up to 70 mph. The last time this happened was 1992. Prior to that, it was 1928, if I recall correctly.

This statistically improbable combination of astronomical high tide and duel-storm merging allowed Sandy to pour a full seven feet of water into many of my area neighborhoods, which is unprecedented. Irene had previously beaten the 100-year high water mark by 5 inches at a high mark of 4 feet. Sandy almost doubled this level.

There has most certainly been an uptick in coastal weather events, and they are increasing in severity in my area. You cannot begin to imagine the financial and emotional ruin these events have caused.

And don't dare mention FEMA as a fallback for affected communities. Flood insurance is absolutely worthless. From firsthand knowledge I can assure you that it is a federal redistribution scam on a grand scale. They take from the homeowners and give it all to the renters who never bought policies, even though it is a local statute that renters must hold a policy. Flood insurance policies cover almost NOTHING in terms of structural damage. All they do is offer SBA loans provided that you agree to let the federal government put a lien on your home for the loan amount. Yeah, right. Bite me.

And, for the love of God, do NOT donate to the Red Cross. They told so many of my neighbors that they had nothing to offer them...nothing...despite the hundreds of millions of dollars they were collecting in donations. But, hey, the guy who runs Red Cross just gave himself a $6 million bonus, so all is great in the world.



This is awful, and it does nothing to make me feel better about my additional $550 a year flood insurance policy that Wells Fargo Bank decided I needed after someone down the street (an eighth of a mile away) took on some water. When I first moved to this subdivision about six years ago, we had unprecedented rain, a true 100 year event, and the water came no where near my house. But hey, I am guessing that the government needs my revenue from what you are saying. Oh, it has also gone up from $450 to $550 in two years. Just great. My normal homeowner's insurance is not much more than this, so this additional policy is just a bonus. Not to mention the fact that from what you just described, it won't do a whole hell of a lot if we do flood. Just friggin' awesome.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 07:49 PM
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Interesting topic, I will just add my thoughts and experiences without judgement.....
First off is I believe that the number one job of the media is to promote fear and dependence on what they broadcast.

This is definitely a bad storm, that being said they called for it to happen days ahead of when it did.
First hint it was coming I hit the store for milk/bread, and that was it because we have a Pantry very well stocked.

Our local markets were fully stocked, but with all the major highways now closed things might take two or three days to re-stock.

I really do feel for the people whom live in apartments that are not really conducive to "Laying in the Goods".
I mean it has to be tough to drive for 30 minutes, or walk that long or more and then come home to no parking and dealing with an elevator or worse 6 flights of stairs just to get food into your home.

We are also fortunate enough to have a garage with a cement floor, If we lose the power we can empty our freezer out and just set all the stuff on the floor which just happens to be frozen


I can relate to people gassing up their cars as you never know when the next gas shipment is coming in and also it is a safe place to store fuel if you ever need it.

Our city is a major world scale refinery base.....4 Major companies.....we still don't bank on having fuel during bad weather. So anyone else will have less luck than us for getting gas/diesel .....fill the tank I say.

Our truck is full (100 Litres) Our car is full (65 Litres) Plus I have about 90 Litres in portable fuel tanks in the garage.


We were blessed with this storm starting last night and it really was not that bad, it ended today about 4 pm and we received about 9 inches of snow.

The only problem was that the wind was horrific to say the least and still is now.

All the local roads are clear and the power is still on but the main Highways are closed as I type this.

I can't imagine living in a city still reeling from a hurricane and being stuck there with nowhere to go.

Reading the posts here on this thread makes me truly appreciative of our own unique situation..

Hoping all you folks on the East Coast hold your own and come out in one piece.

Regards,Iwinder
In the OP video I did not see panic but yes there were empty shelves for sure.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 11:59 AM
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Update from New England...

Our community made it through with 38 inches of the white stuff this morning. The power is still on and, most importantly, the tide stopped about 2 yards from the front doors of the first line of houses at our shore. Can't get up the street without my snowshoes on, as there are 6-8 foot drifts, thanks to the wind, but all is good and peaceful in the world at the moment. Now out to do more shoveling...



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 12:02 PM
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i have been talking to my new england bretheren all morining. just talked to my dad who said its alot of snow he has seen in a long time. but he also says its no storm of 76/77. they live outside of providece RI. they said its mailny the east side of narragansett bay and the towns of newport james town etc that dont have power. decent storm.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by generik
people from places like Buffalo will be used to it but then places like Toronto are not and they are also being hit. yet anyone in the norther areas should at least have a basic idea on dealing with it even tho they may not get it all the time. just use commons sense for the most part.

i wish i was there for it, i'm missing out on all the fun snow storms bring. i love them. :cry:


What are you talking about Toronto is 30 miles across the lake from Buffalo?!!!! Pretty much the same area, Bad example. If the winds come from the east Toronto gets buried in snow if they come from the west Buffalo gets it. Only difference is Lake Erie will freeze at some point and no longer make snow but Lake Ontario will not freeze and can continue to make Lake effect snow. Life long resident here unfortunately.





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