A solar 'superstorm' is coming and we'll only get 30-minute warning

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posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by Dustytoad
 


Nice, I thought so, and yeah, ATS is always ahead of everything.


I can even be miss paranoia and use my super huge 80;s micorwave if I want, lol.... I will just unplug everything else probably though. haha




posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by daryllyn
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 





Check Wikipedia.


Wiki is not a reliable source.

Just sayin'....

The article is saying that we would have a 30 minute warning before it ejects, not a 30 minute warning of it hitting the earth.


edit on 7-2-2013 by daryllyn because: (no reason given)



Quite the contrary, wikipedia tends to have quite a bit of accurate and useful information.

The Earth is roughly 90 million miles from the Sun, so yes, we would have well into a day or more's warning of a direct-hit CME.

Wiki:


CMEs typically reach Earth one to five days after leaving the Sun.



As for knowing when a CME is going to go off in general, I don't believe we have that capability yet, or so I believe.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 12:17 AM
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reply to post by hp1229
 


NBC News mentioned this tonight and the incoming asteroid on the 15th of Feb. instead of the usual stuff about the solar storm not going to hurt us and the about the asteroid, scientists saying it will not hit us, he said..."there is nothing we can do about it'.
He looked in a sad mood.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 12:26 AM
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Originally posted by 1Providence1

Originally posted by daryllyn
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 





Check Wikipedia.


Wiki is not a reliable source.

Just sayin'....

The article is saying that we would have a 30 minute warning before it ejects, not a 30 minute warning of it hitting the earth.


edit on 7-2-2013 by daryllyn because: (no reason given)



Quite the contrary, wikipedia tends to have quite a bit of accurate and useful information.

The Earth is roughly 90 million miles from the Sun, so yes, we would have well into a day or more's warning of a direct-hit CME.

Wiki:


CMEs typically reach Earth one to five days after leaving the Sun.



As for knowing when a CME is going to go off in general, I don't believe we have that capability yet, or so I believe.


Notice that they used the word TYPICALLY, a CME that would cripple our power infrastructure would not be a typical CME.




It is inevitable that an extreme solar storm – caused by the Sun ejecting billions of tonnes of highly-energetic matter travelling at a million miles an hour – will hit the Earth at some time in the near future, but it is impossible to predict more than about 30 minutes before it actually happens, a team of engineers has warned.


I believe they mean 30 minutes from the time it erupts from the sun to the time it hits earth. The distance from earth to the sun is almost 93 million miles. At a million miles per hour thats 93 minutes. They can travel over a million miles per hour. So yes it could be 30 minutes from the time it erupts to the time it hits. They are trying to be dramatic (to get your attention).



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 12:55 AM
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A super storm is not "coming". There is nothing on route. It's inevitable and should be expected, eventually... But it isn't necessarily imminent.

And to those that are saying you should just unplug your appliances... Sorry, that won't work with massively varying magnetic fields or an EMP. The issue is that induced currents and voltage differentials fry sensitive components, regardless of whether a power supply exists for the system.

During the Carrington event people reported telegraph machines clicking as if a message were coming through even when they were unplugged. Regardless of whether you pull the battery in your new Cadillac, she's still going to end up with fried electronics. Voltage spikes from the power grid are a concern, regarding damage to devices, but the real issue is going to be the damage directly done to equipment. The more intricate and complex, the less likely it is going to be that it survives.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by IronVelvet


I believe they mean 30 minutes from the time it erupts from the sun to the time it hits earth. The distance from earth to the sun is almost 93 million miles. At a million miles per hour thats 93 minutes. They can travel over a million miles per hour. So yes it could be 30 minutes from the time it erupts to the time it hits. They are trying to be dramatic (to get your attention).


NO... Miles per hour.. Not Miles per minute... They do teach math in school still yea? So do tell me where the minutes are coming from when the units are in hours.

you are off by a factor of 60...

I already did that math for you.. It's 93 hours.. I also did the math for the fastest EVER detected which puts it at around 12.9 hours... That one was going 7.2 Million miles per hour..

Unless the CME is going 186 MILLION miles per hour it won't get here in 30 minutes... CME's don't go that fast by the way.. Being that it's 26 times faster than the fastest ever seen..

Check out some of my posts in the thread..


The entire article is really stupid.
edit on 2/8/2013 by Dustytoad because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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Earth has lost much of its Ionosphere from all these eruptions / excessive solar wind.

That's why there are now satellites over North America firing Ion thrusters down at Earth at night to "expand" the Ionosphere to try and protect you.

You can see them at night, they are the vertical beams of light up in the sky. Easier to see with a night vision camera.

Earth has already had its Ionosphere fail and streaming jets of hyper charged particles poured down onto Earth.It's a biblical sight....already happened in several spots around the planet.

1 event happened accidentally when they were trying to stear a Typhoon from the Philippines. They screwed up and created a plasma up there which caught the solar wind and streamed it down to the ocean.

Killed a bunch of people on ships in the area.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


Ion thrusters would do nothing to expand the ionosphere.
They're actually barely strong enough to move a satellite at all.. really only useful for long straight voyages..
Your post isn't making a lot of sense to me.
edit on 2/8/2013 by Dustytoad because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 02:47 AM
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reply to post by boymonkey74
 


erm, you two

what would you do with the stuff you put in the microwave after this emp has passed, there will be no electricity to plug those in ....

my advice, get as many batteries you can and some light bulbs (those found in bycicle lights) and a radio, just in case power does come on, eventually



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 03:13 AM
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Originally posted by borracho
Just unplugging your device is not enough to protect it form an EMP. The EMP will genereate a huge surge of energy in any and all circuits it hits whetehre they are pugged in or not. The faraday cage is the only way to protect your electronics. It works by diverting the energy around your device and grounding it before it can damage the circuits. I hadn't thought of using a microwave as one, interesting idea. I did see a low cost faraday cage made out of a metal trash can that seemed to work, so it does not have to be an overly complicated structure.


how about just using your car? thats a faraday cage



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 03:27 AM
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So I'm guessing there's enough time for a quickie then?



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 07:36 AM
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30 minutes before it hits is not 'predicting' anything- it's merely seeing it emitted and estimating its travel time.

If it happens, make sure you know how to light a fire and to hunt for your food.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by CristobalColonic
30 minutes before it hits is not 'predicting' anything- it's merely seeing it emitted and estimating its travel time.

If it happens, make sure you know how to light a fire and to hunt for your food.


Run and buy a new generator at Home Depot.
Don't forget to buy gas!


BTW, i think a Carrington Event CME may damage the solar panels on your roof!



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by Dustytoad
 


Obama's Innaug speeches seem to intimate a veiled warning!

Did u get the same impression?



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by Dustytoad

Originally posted by IronVelvet


I believe they mean 30 minutes from the time it erupts from the sun to the time it hits earth. The distance from earth to the sun is almost 93 million miles. At a million miles per hour thats 93 minutes. They can travel over a million miles per hour. So yes it could be 30 minutes from the time it erupts to the time it hits. They are trying to be dramatic (to get your attention).


NO... Miles per hour.. Not Miles per minute... They do teach math in school still yea? So do tell me where the minutes are coming from when the units are in hours.

you are off by a factor of 60...

I already did that math for you.. It's 93 hours.. I also did the math for the fastest EVER detected which puts it at around 12.9 hours... That one was going 7.2 Million miles per hour..

Unless the CME is going 186 MILLION miles per hour it won't get here in 30 minutes... CME's don't go that fast by the way.. Being that it's 26 times faster than the fastest ever seen..

Check out some of my posts in the thread..


The entire article is really stupid.
edit on 2/8/2013 by Dustytoad because: (no reason given)


Yes, it is really stupid BUT it is on the FRONT PAGE !

Maybe they are trying to sell newspapers during a triple dip recession in the UK?


I guess we can help everyone out with the equation again.

Distance = Rate X Time OR
Time = Distance / Rate



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


Kind of makes sense that a huge amount of particles would take longer to hit the Earth. More mass would take longer unless so much energy was also release to push the large mass. Can the Sun release that much energy in a single burst? I'd have to defer to the engineers.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 09:58 AM
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Originally posted by wrkn4livn
reply to post by TauCetixeta
 


Kind of makes sense that a huge amount of particles would take longer to hit the Earth. More mass would take longer unless so much energy was also release to push the large mass. Can the Sun release that much energy in a single burst? I'd have to defer to the engineers.


The good news is that everyone on this thread knows about the
Solar Dynamics Observatory.


NASA hits a homerun ! SDO

Just watch how long it takes a CME to flyby Earth.
Let the animation load and watch.
Space Weather Prediction Center



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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And this? www.npr.org... -to-buzz-earth-next-week
edit on 2/8/2013 by dragnik because: change



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by dragnik
And this? www.npr.org... -to-buzz-earth-next-week
edit on 2/8/2013 by dragnik because: change


DA14 is too small and would burn up in the atmosphere. Plus it will be too far away.

The doom and gloomers will need to head back to the drawing board.
Better luck next time.



posted on Feb, 8 2013 @ 11:46 AM
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Saw this on another thread on another site. Just sharing, no idea if it is a joke or what.


arsenalgearnews.livejournal.com...


HAVE JUST BEEN INFORMED: WARNING ISSUED FOR MASS CORONAL EJECTION FROM THE SUN OVER NEXT 72 HOURS-INFO SOURCE STATED THAT BEST NOT TO TRAVEL IN PLANES AND STAY INSIDE AS OPPOSED TO OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES.ON A SCALE OF 1-10 ITS A 10- SOURCE- THIS CAME FROM DEEP BACKGROUND SOURCE IN US MILITARY RELAYED THROUGH CUTOUT!





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